In your opinion, how do you define someone who is or isn’t British??

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  • View Poll Results: How would you, in your opinion, define somebody who is or isn’t British?
    Anyone and everyone who holds British Citizenship (including people who moved here as adults and naturalised)
    53
    41.73%
    A person born and bred in the UK - ancestry is irrelevant
    38
    29.92%
    A person born and bred in the UK – and primarily has British heritage/primarily of British origin
    27
    21.26%
    Anyone in the world who is primarily of British origin, e.g. the British diaspora (the UK, Anglo Americans, Anglo Austrialians, Anglo Canadians etc)
    9
    7.09%

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    I would consider someone British if they're born here or have British folks but born elsewhere, and raised here. That's how citizenship works lol.

    I wouldn't automatically consider someone English even if they're born here but if they are not to ethnically English parents. Because that's now about culture and stuff and lets be honest 90% of immigrants here no matter the number of generations do not assimilate.
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    (Original post by Sharpshooter)
    The reason why I put the last option was because Nick Griffin once claimed that when (ethnic) British people go abroad and have children, they don't become Australian/American, they will always stay British.
    This is true though.

    If I emigrated to Japan and lived there for the rest of my life, I would be an English immigrant; I wouldn't be Japanese.

    Let me ask all of you who are saying being born in the country doesn't matter: If you emigrated to another country, would you still consider yourself British? If yes, then why does it not matter for immigrants in Britain?
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    (Original post by Abstract_Prism)
    This is true though.

    If I emigrated to Japan and lived there for the rest of my life, I would be an English immigrant; I wouldn't be Japanese.
    No, he was talking about the children of British immigrants in foreign countries.

    so for example if a British couple emigrates to Sydney, has a child born and bred there, that child will still be British, because he/she is ethnically British, even if he/she never sets foot in the UK, that's what he was trying to say.
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    Someone who was born in the UK and/or someone who has moved to the UK and has aquired UK citizenship.

    Afaik those are the two main definitions of what it means to be British.
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    (Original post by WBZ144)
    Sounds like a plan, good luck . I would love to live in some more countries as well because there is such a vast world out there and it feels like there is so much to learn about it and so many adventures to have. I feel a connection with the Middle East after living there and do miss it sometimes but there isn't that sense of homesickness that I get after leaving the UK for a while. So I would probably have to come back here after a few years or so.
    Thank you
    Exactly, when the world is so big I don't feel like sticking to just one place for the rest of my life.
    You lived in the Middle East, how was that experience? Arabs are so racist towards South Asian and Black people. I personally couldn't live there at all.
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    (Original post by Eternalflames)
    Thank you
    Exactly, when the world is so big I don't feel like sticking to just one place for the rest of my life.
    You lived in the Middle East, how was that experience? Arabs are so racist towards South Asian and Black people. I personally couldn't live there at all.
    You got that right :P. I certainly do not miss the racism and have utter contempt for the mindsets that were common there but I also met some really lovely people. So I guess that what I really miss are my friends, although I would most probably never live there again. Superficial things about the culture such as the food, music, dance and clothing were all great to experience though. I loved how warm and courteous people were when they welcomed guests into their homes too. Our neighbours were inviting us to dinner every evening, we had to start making excuses most of the times. Then they would send food and sweets over.

    That said, I think that in some cases the reason why they were so nice to us was because we were Black Westerners (and even we faced racism at times). If we came directly from Africa, the treatment would probably be completely different. Also, the gender roles drove me crazy, and poor foreigners worked in awful conditions.
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    Someone who considers themselves to be British and is considered by others to be.

    It is not a question of birthplace in anything other than legalistic terms.

    Who knows that the Duke of Wellington was born in Ireland for example? Did any of you? He considered himself British, not Irish, and others considered him to be also.

    As he is supposed to have said "if you are born in a stable that doesn't make you a horse."
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    (Original post by Sharpshooter)
    No, he was talking about the children of British immigrants in foreign countries.

    so for example if a British couple emigrates to Sydney, has a child born and bred there, that child will still be British, because he/she is ethnically British, even if he/she never sets foot in the UK, that's what he was trying to say.
    I think there is some truth to that, especially when the child practices their parents' culture. There are plenty of kids in Britain who are the children of immigrants and do not consider themselves British, and nobody bats an eye.
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    White skin
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    someone who doesn't have british humour, doesn't get our banter is a non-brit in my patriotic eyes!
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    (Original post by 0to100)
    lets be honest 90% of immigrants here no matter the number of generations do not assimilate.
    If that isn't a bull**** figure then I don't know what is.

    You're telling me that hundreds of thousands of black people who immigrated here for the last century from the Caribbean and Africa, and their children haven't assimilated?

    The same for various groups of Indians that were either brought here, immigrated, or forced out of their own some counties and were British subjects, who now have raised children here and have lived here for more than 50 years?

    90%? Really?
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    (Original post by Sharpshooter)
    For example take me I’m born and raised in England to Irish parents and I personally would find it quite difficult to call myself British/english given I have no British ancestry (mum is from NI however). However FWIW I actually moved to NI at 14, moving during school, still have an English accent today, and known to everyone as the “English guy” so by that token, given I don’t have an Irish accent, never played Gaelic games (Irelands no.1 sport), never learned Irish, never went to catholic schools, I don’t feel Irish and I wouldn't be accepted as properly Irish by the locals either. So I’ve come to conclusion I don’t have a proper nationality in actual fact, but not having British heritage I feel prohibits me from calling myself a true Brit.

    However, I do want to make it clear that if a Black or an Asian person considers themselves British/English, I will too, I’ll consider people what they consider themselves to be, I just personally wouldn't feel comfortable being in that situation calling myself British (hence why I don't).

    So who in your opinion, do consider a British person to be? (I've decided to poll this )
    British ancestry is irrelevant to being British. How come you say you have no 'proper nationality'? If you can't think of a nationality you identify with more than British, then surely you are British. Also there's no such thing as a 'true Brit' maybe that's where your confusion lies.
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    (Original post by Abstract_Prism)
    I think there is some truth to that, especially when the child practices their parents' culture. There are plenty of kids in Britain who are the children of immigrants and do not consider themselves British, and nobody bats an eye.
    That's a problem, people who are British but don't get any of the benefits because they dont feel they are.
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    Britain is essentially a nation of migrants
    Celts, Romans, Anglo-Saxons, Normans and Vikings, Huguenots, Indians, Russian Jews, Germans and Caribbeans/Indians after the fall of the British Empire.
    Thus to deny someone the right to be 'British' due to their ethnicity does not make sense.
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    (Original post by Sharpshooter)
    Hi all, I’m just curious about how you, in your opinion, would consider somebody who is or isn’t British?

    As we all know, we are living in a more and more globalised world, with increasing mobility and transport meaning more movement between people, more immigration within the world meaning what defines a person’s nationality is becoming more complex now. A lot of people however are opposed to this globalisation, fearing loss of British cultural identity and would take the more traditional view that in order to be British is not only to born and bred in the UK, but to be primarily of British origin/have British ancestry as well. Whether we like it or not history and heritage are an important part of a persons identity.

    For example take me I’m born and raised in England to Irish parents and I personally would find it quite difficult to call myself British/english given I have no British ancestry (mum is from NI however). However FWIW I actually moved to NI at 14, moving during school, still have an English accent today, and known to everyone as the “English guy” so by that token, given I don’t have an Irish accent, never played Gaelic games (Irelands no.1 sport), never learned Irish, never went to catholic schools, I don’t feel Irish and I wouldn't be accepted as properly Irish by the locals either. So I’ve come to conclusion I don’t have a proper nationality in actual fact, but not having British heritage I feel prohibits me from calling myself a true Brit.

    However, I do want to make it clear that if a Black or an Asian person considers themselves British/English, I will too, I’ll consider people what they consider themselves to be, I just personally wouldn't feel comfortable being in that situation calling myself British (hence why I don't).

    So who in your opinion, do consider a British person to be? (I've decided to poll this )
    Wooow, it's been a while since I last saw that many red gems.
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    (Original post by Wilfred Little)
    Raheem Sterling
    Wilfried Zaha
    Rita Ora
    Louis Theroux
    Mo Farah
    Joanna Lumley
    John Barnes

    These are not Brits in your opinion?
    By his definition, Richard Dawkins, a clear example of Britishness, is not even British
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    what if someone wasnt born in britain but came when they were very young?
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    Anyone born in the UK is British by mere default nationality and also by citizenship, but both of these classifications are meaningless. For two reasons. Firstly people not born in the Uk but to British parents are still British. Secondly, anyone can get citizenship, plus it hasn't always existed.

    You are indigenous British if your ethnic homeland is the British Isles. Only Europeans can be classed as such. Arabs, Africans, Asians etc are British in terms of nationality, citizenship and maybe culture (if they've integrated).
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    British born or someone who came to the UK when they were young.

    But let me tell you this, if you are born British and you Voted Remain and did not defend this country's sovereignty from foreign corrupt bureacrats, you lose 45% of your Britishness.
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    The first.
 
 
 
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