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    (Original post by EDUC4TION)
    Ok thanks all for the suggestions, I'll make further changes and ask some friends to review it as well. I just want the best possible CV as I haven't had too much luck so far.



    Could you direct me to this forum please? Would be much appreciated.
    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/forumdisplay.php?f=339
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    Thank you!
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    (Original post by EDUC4TION)
    Thank you!
    How are you doing with your CV?
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    Wow been a while since i've been om tsr. I wont make a habit of this as my MSc is way too intense, but heres some advice my fellow postgrad:

    - delete the profile completely no employer is going to read it.

    - include a "relevant modules" line to each of your degrees and list any modules pertinent to the position you are applying for.

    - the formatting looks a little off but that could just be what it looks like on my phone.

    - contact number | email - one line
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    really bad lol
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    Ok thank guys I've attached the latest version, hopefully I'm getting there!
    Attached Files
  1. File Type: docx CV2.docx (15.3 KB, 48 views)
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    (Original post by EDUC4TION)
    Ok thank guys I've attached the latest version, hopefully I'm getting there!
    It's getting better but there are still a few things that I would personally change.

    Get rid of the "I.T. graduate with interpersonal, customer service and time management skills." This means absolutely nothing - I can see you are an IT graduate, I can see you have customer service experience and I can assume you have time management and interpersonal skills (pretty much everyone has a level of this).

    For the third time now, GCSE's should be GCSEs. But to make your formatting consistent I would change it to the same format as your A-levels - e.g. Subject (grade). The vagueness of 6 Cs or above might not show that you have excelled by getting an A*, A or B in some subjects they think are important.

    Don't shorten your work experience to Summer 2014 or Summer 2013 - this is far too vague. I will assume you did it for a week not that you did it for the whole summer. Month to Month is more suitable.

    I'd also put it in a more traditional font, but thats a very minor point.

    With the key technical skills I would provide any details of examples of when you have worked on those (but only if you have them).
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    (Original post by J-SP)
    It's getting better but there are still a few things that I would personally change.

    Get rid of the "I.T. graduate with interpersonal, customer service and time management skills." This means absolutely nothing - I can see you are an IT graduate, I can see you have customer service experience and I can assume you have time management and interpersonal skills (pretty much everyone has a level of this).

    For the third time now, GCSE's should be GCSEs. But to make your formatting consistent I would change it to the same format as your A-levels - e.g. Subject (grade). The vagueness of 6 Cs or above might not show that you have excelled by getting an A*, A or B in some subjects they think are important.

    Don't shorten your work experience to Summer 2014 or Summer 2013 - this is far too vague. I will assume you did it for a week not that you did it for the whole summer. Month to Month is more suitable.

    I'd also put it in a more traditional font, but thats a very minor point.

    With the key technical skills I would provide any details of examples of when you have worked on those (but only if you have them).
    Ok thanks so much, I made all the changes you've suggested. Removed the top sentence. I corrected GCSEs the first time but Word must have kept adding the comma without me noticing. I added the grades for each of my GCSEs and the months I worked on my jobs. All my technical skills were simply gained from my University modules and projects so I'm not sure I can add anything there.

    I am also wondering though if I should add skills gained from University below education, if its suitable? Such as "ability to think quickly under pressure and give well thought-out answers, such as during Q&A sessions following a presentation" or "able to organise and manage time effectively, demonstrated by completing all projects and assignments under deadline"~ etc. What do people think? I'm basically trying to show extra skills from Uni and not just those gained from the little work experience I hold.

    Thank you.
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    (Original post by EDUC4TION)
    Ok thanks so much, I made all the changes you've suggested. Removed the top sentence. I corrected GCSEs the first time but Word must have kept adding the comma without me noticing. I added the grades for each of my GCSEs and the months I worked on my jobs. All my technical skills were simply gained from my University modules and projects so I'm not sure I can add anything there.

    I am also wondering though if I should add skills gained from University below education, if its suitable? Such as "ability to think quickly under pressure and give well thought-out answers, such as during Q&A sessions following a presentation" or "able to organise and manage time effectively, demonstrated by completing all projects and assignments under deadline"~ etc. What do people think? I'm basically trying to show extra skills from Uni and not just those gained from the little work experience I hold.

    Thank you.
    I wouldn't bother with the skills gained at university section. It is bound to be the same content that 99% of graduates could also claim.

    With the technical skills, did you work on specific projects to create something with those types of software/technical skills? If so, that is the detail you should include in that section.
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    (Original post by J-SP)
    I wouldn't bother with the skills gained at university section. It is bound to be the same content that 99% of graduates could also claim.

    With the technical skills, did you work on specific projects to create something with those types of software/technical skills? If so, that is the detail you should include in that section.
    Ok fair enough.

    Yeah so for interaction design I used Balsamiq software to create a prototype mobile interface for students dealing with emotional resilience.

    Java I briefly used in a group project to create a journal recommender system for academic use. Although in this project I was mostly dealing with documentation and testing rather than coding.

    SQL/Oracle I used to create a tracking database for a car park.

    I didn't realise it was suitable to add exactly what my projects were when I used each software. So I should briefly include the above within my technical skills?
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    (Original post by EDUC4TION)
    Ok fair enough.

    Yeah so for interaction design I used Balsamiq software to create a prototype mobile interface for students dealing with emotional resilience.

    Java I briefly used in a group project to create a journal recommender system for academic use. Although in this project I was mostly dealing with documentation and testing rather than coding.

    SQL/Oracle I used to create a tracking database for a car park.

    I didn't realise it was suitable to add exactly what my projects were when I used each software. So I should briefly include the above within my technical skills?
    Yes you should - but only if the role you are applying to requires that particular bit of technical knowledge. It shouldn't be included if it doesn't.

    Stating you have technical knowledge with just the name of the technology means very little. It doesn't tell me how you have learnt the technology or how you have aapplied it to your learning. More detail is incredibly helpful to the recruiter to see whether you can apply that knowledge in the workplace or not.
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    (Original post by J-SP)
    Yes you should - but only if the role you are applying to requires that particular bit of technical knowledge. It shouldn't be included if it doesn't.

    Stating you have technical knowledge with just the name of the technology means very little. It doesn't tell me how you have learnt the technology or how you have aapplied it to your learning. More detail is incredibly helpful to the recruiter to see whether you can apply that knowledge in the workplace or not.
    Ok great I'll do that depending on the jobs I apply for. Thanks again for the tips, and everyone else.
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    Two tips

    1) When you get to your final drafts DON'T leave the file name as "CV.doc". Change it to your name and the organisation/job title you're sending it to.

    2) Your starter CV should be something you can easily customise to tailor it for specific jobs/roles/organisations - you shouldn't have a personal statement that will work for every application you make...trying to meet the requirements of every possible role in a single document is one reason that you're struggling. Personally I think you'd benefit a lot from moving to something similar to https://www.kent.ac.uk/careers/cv/maturecv.htm in design....but that front page should be different for every single use of your CV. Put together a spreadsheet of different skills that your target employers/jobs require and examples of when you've demonstrated/used those skills. Then when you're sending your CV to someone spot what skills they're asking for and hammer home on your front page why you've got those skills. Pull examples from work experience, project work, personal life - wherever is most relevant. At the same time make sure you're looking at the LANGUAGE organisations use to talk about themselves - check their websites for mission statements and values and parrot back to them the same words. Worst case scenario - you look like you've done your research, best case - you look like someone who will fit in straightaway.
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    This contradicts above posters a little but will say it anyway:
    - I think it is worth putting modules learnt at university. Make them specific to the job - e.g. if a company is well known for X and you've studied it, say that
    - I think CVs look much better with a personal statement - but tailor it to each job. Say what role you're looking for and why
    - As someone else said, add in a little bit about how you've used the technical skills, especially if you've built something impressive with them
    - Is there anything else from school/uni (even voluntary) you can put in to bulk out your experience a little?
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    (Original post by roflcakes1)
    z
    - I think CVs look much better with a personal statement - but tailor it to each job. Say what role you're looking for and why
    What is the general consensus on this? Personally I don't use a personal statement - should I?

    I thought this kind of thing was for the cover letter?
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    (Original post by AshEntropy)
    What is the general consensus on this? Personally I don't use a personal statement - should I?

    I thought this kind of thing was for the cover letter?
    There isn't a general consensus. Personal statements are like marmite - some people love them, others hate them.

    But if you are applying with a cover letter it is pretty redundant. Not every job application has a CV and a covering letter though.
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    (Original post by J-SP)
    There isn't a general consensus. Personal statements are like marmite - some people love them, others hate them.

    But if you are applying with a cover letter it is pretty redundant. Not every job application has a CV and a covering letter though.
    I've had employers tell me that their first glance of your CV determines first impressions even before cover letter. Most will look at your CV first to determine whether you have the experience they need, and won't read your cover letter if not (especially if they're getting many applications for a single role). So it can be beneficial even if you submit a cover letter. But it needs to be written well - in my opinion it's better to not have a personal statement than to have a poorly written, generic, or long-winded one. But yes, it's a personal choice whether to include one - often it's much more important if you have years of experience as a summary of exactly your skillset and background.
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    (Original post by roflcakes1)
    I've had employers tell me that their first glance of your CV determines first impressions even before cover letter. Most will look at your CV first to determine whether you have the experience they need, and won't read your cover letter if not (especially if they're getting many applications for a single role). So it can be beneficial even if you submit a cover letter. But it needs to be written well - in my opinion it's better to not have a personal statement than to have a poorly written, generic, or long-winded one. But yes, it's a personal choice whether to include one - often it's much more important if you have years of experience as a summary of exactly your skillset and background.
    I've had plenty of employers (including those I have worked with or for) say the opposite - as I said, they are marmite. Some recruiters will read them, others will look at the covering letter.
 
 
 
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