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Managing my time doing A levels watch

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    (Original post by jend01)
    Thank you so muchfor taking the time out to write a constructive answer for me! It's a lot to take on board but I'll try the timetable again and I would give up playing the flute (my hobby)
    apart from it's the only thing I'm half decent at... I'll consider giving up my job if it doesn't work out anyway, thank you again!
    Hi,

    I made some videos for a private group I run - but I've made them public so you can look at them - I'll keep them up for the rest of November before I put them as private again.

    Hope it helps

    Jade

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vC9cV_sAWRc
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cQm7l63au_c
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    (Original post by Jade CMinds)
    By wider reading I mean reading around your subject - so for example - if you have done everything you have to do for school but still have a study spot free then read ahead of your subjects. I'm really thinking from a science point of view if I'm honest but I can imagine the same applies in other subject - for example maybe reading around (any thing other than the text book) a period of time you are studying, or youtubing some concepts you didn't fully understand. There is always something productive that you could be doing - especially at the beginning half of the school year when the work load is less intense.
    Oh I see , thank you so much, you are a big help


    What!!!! The workload intensifies later on in year 12? 😨😰😰
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    (Original post by X_Hope_X)
    Oh I see , thank you so much, you are a big help


    What!!!! The workload intensifies later on in year 12? 😨😰😰
    No problem - I'm here to help - and yes this is just the beginning - but you'll get there don't worry.
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    (Original post by azizadil1998)
    Eh I would recommend putting your A Levels at the top, and working Friday's and Sunday's may not be a good idea because weekends is when you're supposed to be able to rest and catch up on stuff you may not have had time to do during the week. Possibly consider getting a zero hour contract/casual job e.g. at a stadium or something so that you can choose when to work and this should allow you to balance much better. I'm not sure where you live of course but if it's a city then you're bound to have a football or rugby stadium and they always have jobs (I work in Fulham FC) as long as they're decent sized, usually run by one of two companies (Compass Event Jobs or Delaware North).
    thank you, i'll think about it
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    (Original post by Acsel)
    I apologise if I've offended you, that absolutely wasn't my intention and I'm sorry if my post seemed very abrupt. I wasn't trying to insinuate that you're lazy either.

    From my experience I just don't understand how anyone except those with exceptional circumstances (e.g. carers) could struggle with finding time to do college work. I spent 4 years at college, taking a BTEC and Maths in my first two years (the BTEC requiring a lot of coursework to be completed) and Psychology, Graphics and Computing in my second 2 years (Psychology has a ton of content to learn and my teacher was awful for Computing so I taught myself the entire syllabus). Alongside this I also worked during the week for a minimum of 12 hours and still had time to pursue hobbies and relax. I very rarely had to touch college work at the weekend. I knew plenty of people that didn't have jobs and so on, meaning they'd have even more free time.

    This is an attempt to blow my own horn, I just simply don't understand how you don't have the time, especially with the numbers I gave before. I could theorise and say that maybe you're learning inefficiently, or you're procastinating/getting distracted, or you're focusing on the wrong things, or whatever. Only you know if any of these, or something else is the issue.

    Ultimately we all have the same 24 hours in a day. Some people use their time efficiently and others don't. Some people simply have far more work to do than others. The problem is you've given no indication of what exactly the issue is. You mentioned that you do 3 subjects (none of which I'm familiar with so can't comment on the work load) and struggle to balance that with hobbies and work. You also mentioned that work isn't affecting it since you work Firday evenings and Sunday. So the only things we have to go on are that you're doing 3 subjects and can't balance the workload with your hobbies. What I'm asking is why not? What specifically in your situation is preventing you from balancing when plenty of other people have no trouble?

    I again apolgise, since I'm sure that sounds like I'm having an unnecessary dig at you. You have a problem that not everyone has and the first stop to solving that problem is to recognise what it is that's causing the problem in the first place. The easiest way to do that is to identify where your time is going. Like I said before there's a fixed amount of time each day. Get a piece of paper or start up Excel and draw up an hour by hour planner for each day. Fill it in from when you wake up to when you sleep with eveyr guaranteed event that takes up your time. You might have something like this:

    7-8: Wake up / breakfast / get ready for college
    8-9: Wake up / breakfast / get ready for college / travel to college
    9-10: Class
    10-11: Class
    11-12:
    12-13: Lunch
    13-14: Class
    14-15: Class
    15-16: Travel home
    16-17:
    17-18: Homework
    18-19: Dinner
    19-20: Homework
    20-21: Hobby
    21-22:
    22-23: Sleep

    From this you should be able to identify just what free time you have, where you are spending time (maybe unecessarily) and genreally what needs to improve. Here's one of mine, although it is a little outdated

    Attachment 594176

    I can look at this and immediately see where all my free blocks are, where I lack free time and so on. I could easily add in other hobbies, set times to do work out of class and so on. Keep in mind that while it looks pretty bare I'm expected to do around 6 hours of additional work for each of my units, which would be an additional 30 hours. I've quickly blacked out 30 hours worth on the timetable which just so happens to be every free gap between 9am and 9pm, Monday to Friday. So even with 42 hours of uni work, 15 hours of hobbies and an unreasonable 3 hours for dinner each day I still have pretty much all of my Saturday and Sunday free. I'm aware there are issues, for example I can't teleport to my classes (yet) and thus need to factor in some travel time. Same for attending my hobbies and there's no time dedicated to doing all the other stuff a uni student needs to do (washing, cleaning, buying food, crying over a lack of money and so on).

    The key point though is that if I can spend 40 hours on classes and 15 hours on hobbies and still have almost 2 full days to spare then anyone can do it if they plan their time correctly.

    So I ask my original question again. Where is it that you're struggling? Is the main issue that you're getting too much work with next day deadlines? Factor that into your timetable or discuss it with your teachers. Do your hobbies take up too much time? Do you need to scale back how much time you spend on them? Are you finding specific work difficult, meaning it takes longer than you expect? Are you getting distracted? (I've been on TSR for an hour when I should be doing some work and I got up much later than usual, 9 instead of 6. I've mostly wasted the morning).

    If you can identify what causes the problem you can take steps to actively change it. I hope that helps and apologise in advance for anything that sounds elitist, snarky or in any other way could offend. And good luck with your A Levels
    Oh dw, it's just me reading into things. I think the problem is that I don't actually know how to be organised and I just need some ideas about how I can improve that really.

    I've already twigged that once I get down to it, I'm fairly efficient and get my work done but it's actually getting "into the zone" where I have to take a step back, clear my head and knuckle down with it and planning ahead because work always takes longer than you think it will. I'm going give this timetable thing a shot because a hell of a lot of people have recommended it.

    Lastly, thank you so much for taking out the time to reply, your advice is much appreciated and rest assured that I will take it on board!
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    (Original post by jend01)
    thank you, i'll think about it
    of course up to you - but think about this as well; is it worth sacrificing two years of possibly the most important years of your schooling for a part time job?
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    (Original post by jend01)
    Oh dw, it's just me reading into things. I think the problem is that I don't actually know how to be organised and I just need some ideas about how I can improve that really.

    I've already twigged that once I get down to it, I'm fairly efficient and get my work done but it's actually getting "into the zone" where I have to take a step back, clear my head and knuckle down with it and planning ahead because work always takes longer than you think it will. I'm going give this timetable thing a shot because a hell of a lot of people have recommended it.

    Lastly, thank you so much for taking out the time to reply, your advice is much appreciated and rest assured that I will take it on board!
    Well unfortunately there's no "one size fits all" method to being organised. Some people need to plan their day down to the minute, others have no problem just getting on with whatever needs to be done, and so on. As far as actual methods go for organisation a few I can think up off the top of my head are:

    --Planners (diaries, timetables, etc.)
    --Lists (Write a list of everything you need to do and when it needs to be done in chronological order. Work down the list)
    --Fear (Use the fear of what will happen if you don't do work to give yourself motivation to do something)
    --Accountability (Get someone else to make you feel accountable. You'll feel more guilty if you let someone else down by not being organised which encourages you to work)
    --Reward models (Be organised, get things do and reward yourself with something at the end of it)

    Some of those are a little more "out there" than what many people are used to but they all work. You can also combine the ideas, such as rewarding yourself for following a planner.

    The biggest issue tends to be getting into a habit of doing things. When you find something that works, such as a well organised timetable you need to make sure you stick to it. That's where something like habit comes in.

    I do recommend timetables and scheduling the most, I read a lot of success, business and self help books. Pretty much everyone says the best time management device is to plan your time, sometimes down to the minute.

    As far as getting in the zone goes there's all sorts of things to remember. Some people say that spending more than half an hour makes your brain zone out, others say that when you're in the groove keep going. Try creating a timetable, factor in 50% more time than you think you'll need but equally stay fluid. Don't try to force yourself to do an hour of work if you aren't in the mood for it. This can be dangerous if you don't actively pick up the time somewhere else though.
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    (Original post by Acsel)
    Well unfortunately there's no "one size fits all" method to being organised. Some people need to plan their day down to the minute, others have no problem just getting on with whatever needs to be done, and so on. As far as actual methods go for organisation a few I can think up off the top of my head are:

    --Planners (diaries, timetables, etc.)
    --Lists (Write a list of everything you need to do and when it needs to be done in chronological order. Work down the list)
    --Fear (Use the fear of what will happen if you don't do work to give yourself motivation to do something)
    --Accountability (Get someone else to make you feel accountable. You'll feel more guilty if you let someone else down by not being organised which encourages you to work)
    --Reward models (Be organised, get things do and reward yourself with something at the end of it)

    Some of those are a little more "out there" than what many people are used to but they all work. You can also combine the ideas, such as rewarding yourself for following a planner.

    The biggest issue tends to be getting into a habit of doing things. When you find something that works, such as a well organised timetable you need to make sure you stick to it. That's where something like habit comes in.

    I do recommend timetables and scheduling the most, I read a lot of success, business and self help books. Pretty much everyone says the best time management device is to plan your time, sometimes down to the minute.

    As far as getting in the zone goes there's all sorts of things to remember. Some people say that spending more than half an hour makes your brain zone out, others say that when you're in the groove keep going. Try creating a timetable, factor in 50% more time than you think you'll need but equally stay fluid. Don't try to force yourself to do an hour of work if you aren't in the mood for it. This can be dangerous if you don't actively pick up the time somewhere else though.
    thank you
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    (Original post by azizadil1998)
    of course up to you - but think about this as well; is it worth sacrificing two years of possibly the most important years of your schooling for a part time job?
    I know that, but I'm also attempting to plan ahead and save up. Nothing is free, not university, not getting a car, nothing. Again, thank you for your advice
 
 
 
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