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What A-level Subjects should I take to study Law at a top University? watch

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    (Original post by PQ)
    Neither Cambridge or Oxford have a problem with Sociology or Psychology. Sociology is something Cambridge only recommend for applications to Arts and Social Science courses - so for law it would be fine.

    The key is to take subjects where you're likely to get A*A*A or higher predictions if you are mainly interested in Oxbridge law courses. With *just* AAA/A*AA predictions your chances of an offer are very low.

    None of those subjects would prevent you from getting an offer. Languages are VERY tough to do well in (so you might find that they're more lenient if you have a lower prediction with German A level).
    Attachment 593904
    This is very helpful! Thank you!

    Interestingly I just changed one of the the Subjects from Social Science to German for Cambridge (A*A*A*) and the percentage has increased to 79% !
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    (Original post by Reality Check)
    Yes, I assume so. I suppose I"m still in a mindset where 3 A grades at A level is about top of the pops - it really isn't now, is it? Being something of a fan of statistics, I do wonder how discriminatory A* have been for the best institutions in identifying the best students, or whether they would ideally want an A**: maybe the top 0.5% of the cohort. Maybe they've accepted that that level of granularity is unrealistic and their admissions tests and interviews do very well in sorting out the wheat from the chaff, even if that chaff comprises students with predictions of A*s!
    Very very few get 3A* (I think it's 3% of total students) so the A* does do it's job in most cases. At the very top end Cambridge and Oxford do have MAT/STEP, etc, and also the med schools have BMAT and law schools LNAT to help differentiate.

    There certainly has been grade inflation though, and Cambridge increased their Economics from A*AA to A*A*A this year. They had already increased science offers to A*A*A a few years ago.
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    (Original post by LucindaBurton)
    This is very helpful! Thank you!

    Interestingly I just changed one of the the Subjects from Social Science to German for Cambridge (A*A*A*) and the percentage has increased to 79% !
    Getting A* predicted in German will be tough - the level for an A* is extremely high because native German speakers take German A levels (and the same with other languages).

    If you like German and think you'll do well then absolutely go for it.
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    (Original post by PQ)
    The statistics - are closely guarded and difficult to source.

    https://www.ucas.com/file/43181/download?token=lnUjPHdK contains the likelihood of applicants meeting or exceeding their predictions - it's basically flattened out at 40% of applicants (so 60% missing their predictions....but the vast majority still get accepted).
    Attachment 593908
    (Original post by jneill)
    Very very few get 3A* (I think it's 3% of total students) so the A* does do it's job in most cases. At the very top end Cambridge and Oxford do have MAT/STEP, etc, and also the med schools have BMAT and law schools LNAT to help differentiate. There certainly has been grade inflation though, and Cambridge increased their Economics from A*AA to A*A*A this year. They had already increased science offers to A*A*A a few years ago.
    Thanks to you both for these knowledgable insights. I'll be interested to see how moving the A levels to a linear format changes the situation, particularly in terms of predicted grades. The graph showing 60% of students missing their predictions is extremely surprising to me and very interesting. In any other situation, a model which gets 6 in every 10 cases wrong would be instantly binned! I wonder what the rationale behind sustaining a model where so many predicted grades fall short of their target actually is?!
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    (Original post by jneill)
    I think I might have asked you this before... is there a per university, per course, report showing the % acceptances for various "offer missed" scenarios? e.g. 50% accepted with one grade missed, 10% accepted with a two grade miss, etc. ??
    hahaha

    no - if it was available it would scare the pants off the sector.

    All we can say is that over 60% of applicants get into their firm place....but only 40% meet or exceed their predictions so that's a VERY large group of people accepted with lower grades.
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    (Original post by PQ)
    hahaha

    no - if it was available it would scare the pants off the sector.

    All we can say is that over 60% of applicants get into their firm place....but only 40% meet or exceed their predictions so that's a VERY large group of people accepted with lower grades.
    Interesting. *Very* interesting
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    (Original post by Reality Check)
    Thanks to you both for these knowledgable insights. I'll be interested to see how moving the A levels to a linear format changes the situation, particularly in terms of predicted grades. The graph showing 60% of students missing their predictions is extremely surprising to me and very interesting. In any other situation, a model which gets 6 in every 10 cases wrong would be instantly binned! I wonder what the rationale behind sustaining a model where so many predicted grades fall short of their target actually is?!
    Noone can agree on a new model for post results applications.

    Schools don't want to move the exams a few weeks earlier.
    Exam boards don't want to mark a week or so quicker.
    Universities (especially in Scotland) aren't willing to move their start dates a month or more back.

    And since 2010 the government hasn't been interested in fixing the system. The BIG problem is that there's a big difference between schools types and the tendency to over-predict/under-predict. State schools tend to under predict, independent schools over predict....which is why a lot more universities will basically offer to anyone (or brought in contextual offers).

    https://www.ucas.com/sites/default/f...nsultation.pdf <= it was all set to be forced through in 2008/2009 before the plug got pulled. https://www.ucas.com/sites/default/f...mendations.pdf
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    (Original post by jneill)
    Very very few get 3A* (I think it's 3% of total students) so the A* does do it's job in most cases. At the very top end Cambridge and Oxford do have MAT/STEP, etc, and also the med schools have BMAT and law schools LNAT to help differentiate.

    There certainly has been grade inflation though, and Cambridge increased their Economics from A*AA to A*A*A this year. They had already increased science offers to A*A*A a few years ago.
    Yeah: university of York decreased their economics from AAA with A in maths to AAB to B in maths. Is this because of the Cambridge course increasing?
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    (Original post by MajorFader)
    Yeah: university of York decreased their economics from AAA with A in maths to AAB to B in maths. Is this because of the Cambridge course increasing?
    It's more likely because they've either
    a) realised that people with a B in maths can succeed on the course but weren't applying because of their high standard offer
    or
    b) with curriculum reform on A levels they know that many schools/colleges are making lower predicted grades and they don't want to end up with no students
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    You can take any subject you like. My brother took maths, further maths bio chem and physics and ended up doing law in a top uni.

    In the same way my cousin did english lit, history and sociology and got into law at a top uni.
    It honestly doesn't matter.


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    (Original post by MajorFader)
    Is this because of the Cambridge course increasing?
    How so?
 
 
 
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