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In the word 'Scent', is the S or the C silent? watch

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    In actual fact, most people replace the 'c' with a /h/. Try saying it and you may be able to hear yourself do it. This is because when we articulate in connected speech, sounds undergo assimilation (ie they merge and change to sound different to how they would in isolation). Assimilation occurs here because both /s/ and /h/ are fricatives - their manner of articulation is the same, so it means there is less work involved for the vocal apparatus than trying to produce that 'c' :-) #linguisticsrocks
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    (Original post by retro_turtles)
    she is silent because she ripped her vocal chords from screaming too much mate
    Yeh she was probably trying to torture herself because that would have been more fun than whatever you were trying to do to her #Moooose
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    (Original post by OvergrownMoose)
    Yeh she was probably trying to torture herself because that would have been more fun than whatever you were trying to do to her #Moooose
    that is between me and your mother m8
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    C obviously: saying the word "scent" sounds like it starts with an S and the C isn't pronounced or noticeable in it so out of context you wouldn't know if a person was saying "sent" or "scent".


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    (Original post by OvergrownMoose)
    Is that why we can't see it? #Moooose
    Yeah man!!! It's some Illuminati crap... They hide the P from scent, it's actually spelt SPCENT
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    (Original post by Anna.Karenina)
    In actual fact, most people replace the 'c' with a /h/. Try saying it and you may be able to hear yourself do it. This is because when we articulate in connected speech, sounds undergo assimilation (ie they merge and change to sound different to how they would in isolation). Assimilation occurs here because both /s/ and /h/ are fricatives - their manner of articulation is the same, so it means there is less work involved for the vocal apparatus than trying to produce that 'c' :-) #linguisticsrocks
    Which is why I stick to science. #steprocks
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    Neither are silent?
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    (Original post by champ_mc99)
    Which is why I stick to science. #steprocks
    Most linguists is science ❤️
 
 
 
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