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Mobile phones for children

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    We live in an era now where having a smartphone is actually a necessity, because everyone is on whatsapp/snapchat and there's an app for literally everything, so I think it's acceptable for a year 7 to have a smartphone because their peers will more likely than not have one HOWEVER if I were a parent I wouldn't give them the most expensive flagship smartphone, I'd probably give them a second hand cheap iPhone 5c or something of the sort. Only because it would be their first smartphone and I don't think they can handle something too expensive, nor do they actually need all the fancy features like NFC and the like on the iPhone 7 for example.

    By about year 9/10 I'd be more comfortable giving my children an expensive phone, because they've grown up a bit.

    I don't see any reason why a primary schooler would need a smartphone - they should be out playing with their friends.

    What some people don't realise is that when we were children, smartphones were not a necessity and it was perfectly normal to have a cheap brick phone, so that's a problem solved for them. Blackberries were popular when I was in year 7/8 but having BBM wasn't necessary as not everyone had that phone. But today absolutely EVERYONE has whatsapp, therefore you literally need a smartphone to have a social life so I can understand why young children would want one.
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    My brother has a iPhone 5S (Used to be my Mums), he has unlimited minutes texts and 20GB data! He had the cash back offer sim deal, so it's £10 a month. He's 13 on Christmas eve 🎄
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    (Original post by the bear)
    we all had pagers in those days

    :toofunny:
    Still got the pager I got when I was little. It was an old BT one, never figured out how it worked.

    I was probably one of the first children of my generation to have a mobile phone, in the late 1990s (at around 10 or so). It was an old Telital PV129 (I think) analogue phone. Damn' good piece of gear, would totally still be using it if the analogue infrastructure was still up :moon:
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    15 years old and still don't have a phone.

    >tfw i'm a tech fan too
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    I think that it is perhaps a good idea to give them basic nokia brick phones in case of emergency (e.g. to call police or ambulance) but to give them a smartphone is a bad idea as it exposes them to things they really don't need to see like social media and all the drama that comes with it and inappropriate content e.g. porn and I know they could see inappropriate content on any device but it is so much harder to monitior on a phone. And there is probably a whole ton of problems that come with it such as anxiety problems and stuff. Also kids these days spend far too much time on digital stuff and should play more outdoors at that age.
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    (Original post by parsn1p)
    When I was only 12, my mum got me a mobile phone which was only very basic, but this was back in the days before smartphones (mid-2005).

    This was what she got me (anyone remember these? :moon:)

    Spoiler:
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    Ahhh the Nokia 3310 that was the first phone I had at 16 of course back then it was the best phone you could have on pay and go (2000) yes I'm old.


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    A basic phone should be aight. And trust me, it will be very helpful. I had a Nokia 6600 before 13 though but was not allowed to bring at school and all i did on that were playing games, calling, texting and taking photos. I would also record some videos(short movies with my cousins) with pause and stuff..That's all.. and of course, download cartoons

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    I don't have a phone
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    I think a cheap smartphone is probably a good idea and the idea of giving them a brick phone is somewhat naive. Smartphones have evolved to the point where due to the access they provide they are an integral part of worldwide culture, to introduce children to such a device early on will help them quite a bit, especially if you make its use a discussion piece.
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    Also when i mean calling and texting...mostly my parents and school friends xD..

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    (Original post by starfab)
    Lucky you. Was still at school in 2015 with one of them. And when it broke...i broke into a dance!
    I've still got another basic Nokia mobile phone, but a new one bought a few weeks ago as a backup in case my smartphone suffers a mishap.
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    (Original post by tamil fever)
    I don't have a phone
    Wow really?
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    ...13?

    My child is getting a (very, very basic, probably chinese knockoff) smart phone at age 10 or younger. Hopefully by that time, there'll be an OS like Amazon's one for kids - where you can only download a small selection of kid friendly apps.
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    I know 2 10 year olds who have a Samsung S4 and one already callously smashed hers by hitting it on the wall.

    My first smart phone/touchscreen phone was when i turned 16.

    So many young people are glued to technology these days.
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    (Original post by German123)
    (...)
    So many young people are glued to technology these days.
    Yeah and that worried me. The more they are glued to technology (to say that in your words), the more dependend on technological stuff the next generation is. Call me a conservative, but in my opinion it is important to show children and teenagers that there exists more than merely technology, books for instance.
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    (Original post by Kallisto)
    Yeah and that worried me. The more they are glued to technology (to say that in your words), the more dependend on technological stuff the next generation is. Call me a conservative, but in my opinion it is important to show children and teenagers that there exists more than merely technology, books for instance.
    I completely agree.
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    (Original post by German123)
    I completely agree.
    It is nice to see children who are listening to readers and beginning to read by themselves. I don't miss the childhood where my mother and grandmother were reading books - and the other way round, so reading for them. Have not really had a good childhood and youth, but that was one of the best. Whenever I am seeing children reading books, it gives me a smile. Just because it is getting so rarely, in my view.
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    I think 11/12, when they start going to secondary school on their own is when they need a phone.

    They don't need a phone until parents need to start getting in touch.

    You don't need a phone for the sake of it.
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    (Original post by Tubbz)
    I think 11/12, when they start going to secondary school on their own is when they need a phone.

    They don't need a phone until parents need to start getting in touch.

    You don't need a phone for the sake of it.
    True. Have experienced parents who were moving a buggy in public and calling on a smartphone at the same time. If children have parents with such an affinity to technological things, it is no wonder that children are growing with them up so quickly and early in their life.
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    (Original post by starfab)
    Wow really?
    I know and am still surviving.So those of you who say teenagers can't survive without their phones are wrong
    I found it a distraction and everyday I would sleep at like 3am in the morning and only have 4-5 hours of sleep.Especially all those whatsapp groups and updates.Wasted my life looking through them tbh.I deactivated the whole lot
 
 
 
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