Turn on thread page Beta

What is preferable, a two party system or block based governing. watch

    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Llamas)
    The current system does offer the benefit of constituency representation. PR kind of detatches the whole system from the local level. I would favour using IRV for the commons and PR for a new elected lords.
    IRS is to be avoided as it fails the Arrow test.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Chrism)
    IRS is to be avoided as it fails the Arrow test.
    I thought only dictatorships passed the Arrow tests?
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by NDGAARONDI)
    Are they a member of the Stark Raving Looney Party too? Or whatever they call themselves

    This reminds me of a certain episode of "The Black Adder"

    -Criminal convictions?
    - No, none.
    -Baldrick! You are going to be an MP for crying out loud, Il just
    write fraud and sexual offence.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Llamas)
    I thought only dictatorships passed the Arrow tests?
    Theoretically yes, but IRV fails it far more than other methods such as concordet or borda.

    Here's a very good run down of Arrow's impossibility theorem and its relation to IRV http://www.electionmethods.org/IRVproblems.htm
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Chrism)
    Theoretically yes, but IRV fails it far more than other methods such as concordet or borda.

    Here's a very good run down of Arrow's impossibility theorem and its relation to IRV http://www.electionmethods.org/IRVproblems.htm
    Oh dear, I might have to reconsider!
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Jonatan)
    What do you think is preferable , a system were you essentially have a few parties and the single party with the most votes get to rule, or a system were each party receives a number of votes in government proportional to the number of votes that party received. I would say the latter as it forces the largest parties to take the opinions of minorities into consideration. The disadvantage is of course that it may be more difficult to get things done.
    The best system inevitably depends on the characteristics of the nation in question. To use political science-speak, in a homogeneous culture such as UK, USA, etc. where one main social cleavage exists (eg. class) a 2 party system is better because 1 of the 2 parties will represent 1 of the 1 sides of the cleavage. In heterogeneous cultures where many different communities co-exist (such as N. Ireland) a multi-party system is better, and a political system where proportional voting, cross-community power sharing and minority veto rights are the norm.

    But you can't separate the party system from the electoral system that creates it. To paraphrase Duverger's Law "a pluralitarian voting system inevitably tends towards a 2 party system". I.e. if you have a pluralitarian "winner-takes-all" voting system, people will congregate around 2 parties. When power is widely dispersed under a proportional system, more parties can gain power so more parties exist. Right now that's settled I'm off to bed! ha ha
 
 
 
Poll
Who is most responsible for your success at university
Useful resources

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.