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    (Original post by MrHowlett)
    Lady venom, which VGS were you at? Im currently doing mine,probably going solo next week.
    Haven't been on one for a while so I doubt it's of concern to you
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    opps...
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    (Original post by Rizza Razzu)
    Having a glider scholarship won't matter one iota when you're sat in the classroom on your first groundschool, being bamboozled by engine fuel systems, hydraulics, oil systems and electrics.
    Sounds like your 'first groundschool' lesson was lots of fun! I never had to learn any of what you mentioned, more like effects of controls and the like. Also why would you need to learn hydraulics in your first lesson? Surely the aircraft your flying first will have a very simple if any hydraulic system at all.

    A gliding scholarship will benefit you if plan on going on to become a pilot, in that you will grasp certain concepts taught very early on with ease. Things like the effects of controls, combined controls etc. However you won't have a head start for very long, about 5-10 hours of flying later and you will be past what you learnt when gliding.

    Richard
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    To be honest I've taught many people who havent gone solo and have gone on to pass EFT and so on, so to be honest 40 odd launches doesnt mean a lot...
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    (Original post by Rich2cool4u)
    Sounds like your 'first groundschool' lesson was lots of fun! I never had to learn any of what you mentioned, more like effects of controls and the like. Also why would you need to learn hydraulics in your first lesson? Surely the aircraft your flying first will have a very simple if any hydraulic system at all.
    I don't think there's any aircraft you could possibly fly first in the British military with any hydraulics at all.
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    (Original post by Wzz)
    I don't think there's any aircraft you could possibly fly first in the British military with any hydraulics at all.
    But how will I stop my Tutor with no brakes? :eyeball:
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    Simple, why do you think you were given a parachute? You dont seriously think it's incase of emergency now do you?

    Richard
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    (Original post by Schleigg)
    But how will I stop my Tutor with no brakes? :eyeball:
    (Original post by Rich2cool4u)
    Simple, why do you think you were given a parachute? You dont seriously think it's incase of emergency now do you?

    Richard


    Right. Suggest you don't join in tech stuff.



    (Hint: Brake failure tends to be an issue on the ground; and Schleigg was being pedantic).
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    You never know, he might have been sugggesting I form some sort of brake chute using that and the piece of elastic holding the chinagraph to my kneeboard?
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    Indeed I was, along with Jettisoning the canopy to loose some weight.

    Richard
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    I smell wahs.

    Anway. The tutor hardly requires more than a stretch of grass to stop in said emergency. It's hardly going to be going more than 65kts anyway now is it
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    Oh I don't know. Stuck throttle and mixture lever with a broken fuel **** and magneto grip snapped off could equal a 150kt landing! :P
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    Dont forget those broken flaps, that ceased to work along with the radio when the electric system failed.

    Richard
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    (Original post by Schleigg)
    But how will I stop my Tutor with no brakes? :eyeball:
    By landing, and not taking off again. Seriously, you'll have about 6000ft of runway anywhere you're likely to be flying, so I doubt you'll struggle to coast to a walking pace and shut it down.
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    (Original post by Wzz)
    By landing, and not taking off again. Seriously, you'll have about 6000ft of runway anywhere you're likely to be flying, so I doubt you'll struggle to coast to a walking pace and shut it down.
    I'd much rather have my hydraulic brakes

    Anyway, massive thread drift!
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    Indeed, we need to get back on course.
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    Yes with the Air Cadets.

    Did mine in the Summer of 08 at 626 Predannack VGS although we didn't really have summer weather lol
    Was a brilliant 10days and I got my solo flight in that the course lead towards.
    Are you in cadets?
    Once you go solo there is an Air League Gliding Scholarship you can apply for.
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    Havent done a gliding scholarship.
    However, I am a Bronze C glider pilot, over 300 launches and about 100 hours.
    Been solo 2 years, since my 16th birthday!
    Been told by numerous RAF servicemen that my gliding looks really good for getting into the RAF as it shows interest in aviation as a whole, and also good adventurous activity.
    Gliding is a recognized sport within the RAF, and alot of people are strongly urged to take up an adventurous activity when in the RAF. Gliding is a good example of one.

    So just because it doesn't give you a massive advantage during training, doesn't mean gliding is completely useless. As you are all making out.

    Rant over.
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    (Original post by chrissy-t9)
    Rant over.
    That wasn't much of a rant

    Gliding does indeed show an interest in aviation. It's substantially cheaper and more accessible than basic private flying too. It teaches some decent, basic stick-and-rudder skills and gives you a good introduction to simple principles of flight.

    Private flying has the problem that you'll have to "unlearn" early civvy habits at EFT if you join as a pilot, when you're at the stage of flying where you're still developing. If you have 4000 hours it'll be fine, but if you have 40-odd you'll find that EFT's often actually harder because you want to lapse into the civvy techniques you've just learned.

    However, the time when gliding's bad is when you're the irritating VGS staff cadet type, used to posing around in an old Mk14 flying suit and dodgy aviators, expecting to be given the keys to a Harrier 3 days after OASC. Other than that, it's fine...
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    (Original post by Wzz)
    However, the time when gliding's bad is when you're the irritating VGS staff cadet type, used to posing around in an old Mk14 flying suit and dodgy aviators, expecting to be given the keys to a Harrier 3 days after OASC.
    I know/have seen the type. :rolleyes:
 
 
 
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