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    one of my friends got a B at gcse and got a C in AS just by doing c2 practice papers, he didnt do any work for m1 or c1.
    But another friend who got a B at GCSE, who didnt do any work at all, got a U.
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    I took GCSE higher paper and got a C, took AS maths (with a 2 year gap between these) and got another C (B,C,D for M1,C1,C2)

    Im planning on taking D1, and depending on how i do with past papers when i start college in sept (already looked over book) i might take D2 also (To move my B for M1 to an A in D1/2)
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    if you like maths enough to be able to work hard at it, whilst not being forced by anyone but yourself to put in the hard work, then go for it.
    when it comes to A-levels, if you are commited enough and you devote your time efficiently then there's no reason why you can't get a high grade; particularly with maths, since the key is often understanding concepts and set procedures rather than memorising facts, figures, names and dates.

    but saying that ... all my friends who got a B at gcse maths have just got Ds or worse at AS; except one who got a C and i think they worked pretty hard for it.
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    (Original post by TOM27)
    ...do you think its a wise move??

    Would it be possible to get a good grade?

    Thanks
    I got a B in IGCSE Maths. I took maths as a 4th subject for my A-levels. I got 97% in AS. This year, i got 91% overall. However, i have to completely agree with xemmajanex that it depends how hard you worked for that B you got in GCSE. I didnt do much for my IGCSE and neither did the teachers! My first teacher got fired at the end of my 9th grade cuz he was not qualified enough to teach maths, and my second teacher died in the middle of grade 10. Actually, now i think i have done very well to get away with a B! :S
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    To but honest I didn't do that much revision at all. As I wanted to do higher tier from year 10, I found the lessons/past papers easy. I spent the last two weeks revising knowing that the highest was a B. Although, our school made us do more tests which enabled us to gain another grade, hence the "BB".
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    (Original post by TOM27)
    ...do you think its a wise move??

    Would it be possible to get a good grade?

    Thanks

    I think it is quite a wise move really.

    I only got a B at GCSE, got a B at AS, and then got it up to an A overall for the whole A-level , I also got an A in AS further Maths which I took at the same time as A2 normal Maths.

    So yeh, it is possible to get a good grade. But imo I think you need to enjoy it so you won't mind spending lots of time just using the same techniques!
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    It helps if you've got a good maths teacher. My teachers this year have made it pretty much easy. We cover all the topics in plently of time and do so many practice questions and past papers that I barely needed to work out of lessons for the exams.

    If you've got a good teacher and work hard, theres no reason why you can't do well after getting a B at GCSE.
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    A B is a good grade, so no reason why you shouldn't do A level if you personally feel up to it.
    I though AS was fairly easy considering, particularly if you sit a module in January, as that takes the pressure off. But it will depend on how you find the subject. For instance, Was it easy for you to get your B (remembering that this was the highest you could get) or did you struggle? If you found it a struggle, I wouldn't advise taking it further. If it was easyish, then go ahead.
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    I got B at maths gcse, but a high A at A-Level (575/600), and i also did further maths AS and got A (286/300). Its definitely possible.

    On a similar note, i got CC in double science at gcse and an A at Physics A-Level (596/600).

    I also know several people who got A*'s in maths at gcse, coming out with B's and C's at A-Level. Doesnt mean a thing imo.
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    Do alot of maths and u'll cope with AS i also got a B at GCSE maths... ended up with a B in AS level. Same with a friend of mine who ended up with an extremely high A (28X/300).
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    Hmm, I'm in a similar situation. I'm vaguely considering taking maths for convoluted reasons: I want to do Politics at uni, but a lot of the best unis offer Politics with Economics; to do econs, you seemingly need Alevel maths. It's a bit tricky, 'cause I've got plenty of things I could do as my 4th AS, where I have As or A*s for GCSE -- History, the sciences, etc. But I know maths is the most useful one I could be doing.

    Now, I'm fairly confident (arrogant) about my mental ability to do maths -- I was predicted A*-A at the start of my GCSEs and was in set 1 out of 9. The fact that I got a B was entirely down to Lazy **** Syndrome. I did homework about four times over the course of the two years, and my dad basically ended up teaching me most of the content in a few weeks prior to the exam (yeah, yeah, I deserve a B after that, buuuutttt... it worked for Science).

    So, my questions about this basically come down to two things:

    1. How important is prior knowledge from the GCSE? The whole damn course was in my short-term memory -- to be regurgitated over the two exams. I'm pretty sure most of it is gone by now, so if being compotent with methods and rules from year 10 and 11 is crucial, I might as well forget about it.

    2. How hard do you have to work? It's not just that I'm lazy (although that is part of it)... it's more that I can't work at maths for more than about an hour without wanting to slit my wrists. Give me an English esssay title or a History topic and I'm away. Sorted. But, in the wrong mood, maths can piss me off in about 0.0756 seconds... How effective is cramming? How many hours of homework per week am I looking at? Is it like GCSE - a chain of linear learning, in which dossing for a lesson or two will rob you of any chance to understand the next fifteen?

    Okay, I've pretty much convinced myself that maths = bad idea, just by writing this post. I'm asking the wrong questions.
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    (Original post by The Humble Mosquito)
    Hmm, I'm in a similar situation. I'm vaguely considering taking maths for convoluted reasons: I want to do Politics at uni, but a lot of the best unis offer Politics with Economics; to do econs, you seemingly need Alevel maths. It's a bit tricky, 'cause I've got plenty of things I could do as my 4th AS, where I have As or A*s for GCSE -- History, the sciences, etc. But I know maths is the most useful one I could be doing.

    Now, I'm fairly confident (arrogant) about my mental ability to do maths -- I was predicted A*-A at the start of my GCSEs and was in set 1 out of 9. The fact that I got a B was entirely down to Lazy **** Syndrome. I did homework about four times over the course of the two years, and my dad basically ended up teaching me most of the content in a few weeks prior to the exam (yeah, yeah, I deserve a B after that, buuuutttt... it worked for Science).

    So, my questions about this basically come down to two things:

    1. How important is prior knowledge from the GCSE? The whole damn course was in my short-term memory -- to be regurgitated over the two exams. I'm pretty sure most of it is gone by now, so if being compotent with methods and rules from year 10 and 11 is crucial, I might as well forget about it.

    2. How hard do you have to work? It's not just that I'm lazy (although that is part of it)... it's more that I can't work at maths for more than about an hour without wanting to slit my wrists. Give me an English esssay title or a History topic and I'm away. Sorted. But, in the wrong mood, maths can piss me off in about 0.0756 seconds... How effective is cramming? How many hours of homework per week am I looking at? Is it like GCSE - a chain of linear learning, in which dossing for a lesson or two will rob you of any chance to understand the next fifteen?

    Okay, I've pretty much convinced myself that maths = bad idea, just by writing this post. I'm asking the wrong questions.
    1) I think most of the AS maths stuff is new.. but there is bits like trigonometry... indices, surds etc.. but i'm sure your sixth form/college will teach it from scratch anyways.. i was in a similar position as you so as long as you listen in your maths classes from now... you'll be fine!

    2)The harder you work, the better grade you get..and cramming does no work for maths! for me anyway!! like my teacher said, 'learn maths by DOING maths'. i made the mistake of learning a few formulaes and tring to memorise stuff for my first maths exam (Core 1) and came out with a D.... so i resat it in June!
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    (Original post by TOM27)
    ...do you think its a wise move??

    Would it be possible to get a good grade?

    Thanks
    I got a C for intermediate GCSE Maths and was able to get an A for A-level (did AS myself because my school wouldn't accept me), so it is very possible. GCSEs can a crap indicator of how well you'll do at A-levels; I hate people/teachers who use them to tell/assess their suitability to take up an A-level subject. I personally didn't put much effort into GCSEs - skateboarding most of the time, very little revision. But at A-level I feel I had matured greatly, I realised the significance of GCSEs/A-levels and worked much harder. It's really down to the person at the end of the day. For Maths it requires a lot of exercises, if you put in the effort you'll get the rewards. Just like anything in life.
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    (Original post by The Humble Mosquito)

    2. How hard do you have to work? It's not just that I'm lazy (although that is part of it)... it's more that I can't work at maths for more than about an hour without wanting to slit my wrists.
    I know that feeling!

    I didn't really do much work. In my college it's basically self taught anyway. We have to work through the chapters of the text book then do an assignment. If we get stuck we can ask the tutor.

    I didn't do any of the work, just the assignments that I had to hand in. I did about 3 days revision for each module (but I think 2 would have done it) and got AAB (A overall). I would have had an A for the 3rd one but I missed out a particularly easy 7 mark question that I just couldn't seem to do in the exam.

    Anyway, I reckon you can get away with being lazy at AS, because I did, but you would probably have to work harder at A2 if you don't drop it.
 
 
 

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