Eubacterium
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#21
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#21
Anywhere you need to pay. Check the reception with other students first though. Turns out there isn't any here so people had to cancel their tv licence.
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Muffinski
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#22
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#22
(Original post by louisedotcom)
Our uni tells us not to let them into the building, and the uni dont let them in either, so I havent bothered getting on. Its a rip off.
Thats great! I love your Uni! lol.

We get told like 24 hours before they're due to come, and the Uni tell us to hide tvs lol.

We've not had a inspection for the last 8 years at Staffs, even tho I got like 10 letters last year lol.
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didgeridoo12uk
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#23
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#23
surely when/if they come round... take out the aerial cable, chuck it in a drawer, and claim you only use it to watch dvd's
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Eubacterium
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#24
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#24
(Original post by didgeridoo12uk)
surely when/if they come round... take out the aerial cable, chuck it in a drawer, and claim you only use it to watch dvd's
Believe me, they've seen it all before. You'll still have to pay unless you can prove there's no way you can get reception.

Btw I would think it's illegal for the uni not to allow them in.
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Dionysus
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#25
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#25
(Original post by Eubacterium)
Believe me, they've seen it all before. You'll still have to pay unless you can prove there's no way you can get reception.

Btw I would think it's illegal for the uni not to allow them in.
Of course it's not. Licence Inspectors have no legal powers whatsoever.
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L i b
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#26
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#26
(Original post by Dionysus)
Of course it's not. Licence Inspectors have no legal powers whatsoever.
Quite right.

(Original post by Eubacterium)
Believe me, they've seen it all before. You'll still have to pay unless you can prove there's no way you can get reception.
Quite the opposite in fact. While a court may make a reasonable inference of use in absence of an explanation, it is still down to the prosecution to demonstrate it.

I'm actually toying with an idea under McMeekin v MacPhail (Procurator Fiscal, Perth) that one could avoid any charges if they could simply present someone to say they had sold them the television recently and it was in fact they who had done the tuning. In that case, someone's conviction was quashed on the grounds that there was no finding in fact about how long the he had possessed the receiver and no findings as to whether or not it was plugged in. Therefore, logically, if a TV is unplugged and there is no evidence led as to duration of ownership then you will get off Scot free...

The thing is, in most of these cases, a conviction will be given at first instance because a sheriff, magistrate or whatever else wants to avoid delving into such matters. So if so charged, you'd end up having to take it to the appeal court for a proper consideration of facts. TVL are relying on most people not bothering.
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alex p
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#27
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#27
(Original post by SillyFencer)
How? That would require a TV to emit a signal. They just receive.

phone companies can tell where a phone is when it isnt turned on, let alone giving out a signal.
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20083
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#28
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#28
(Original post by alex p)
phone companies can tell where a phone is when it isnt turned on, let alone giving out a signal.
Right... and that is relevant how? A phone sends and receives signals.
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peach plum pear
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#29
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#29
(Original post by alex p)
they must have some idea of whether you have a tv or not in order to be able to tell how many viewers each channel has on a specific day. if they know what channels are being recieved they can probably get a good idea of whos receiving it. even if its a communal aerialthey could work it out if the no.s dont add up.
I used to think it worked like this! Then I was laughed at...

What about watching telly on a PC? I've got some Home Theatre thing and a TV aerial that goes into my computer. I assume you'd get away with that?
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alex p
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#30
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(Original post by SillyFencer)
Right... and that is relevant how? A phone sends and receives signals.
http://www.tvlicensing.biz/detection...icence_fee.pdf


"TV's do give off several types of electromagnetic [radio] waves. When switched on, a TV behaves like a low-powered transmitter."

well the lisencing people tvs give off a signal as do people whove done research into it. take it up with them if you know more about it
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~Kirsty~
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#31
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#31
(Original post by peach plum pear)
I used to think it worked like this! Then I was laughed at...

What about watching telly on a PC? I've got some Home Theatre thing and a TV aerial that goes into my computer. I assume you'd get away with that?
Its the same as a TV - it will send and transmit signals the same. You'd only get away with watching TV online really (like ITV).
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rufnek2k6
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#32
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#32
(Original post by alex p)
phone companies can tell where a phone is when it isnt turned on, let alone giving out a signal.
they cant tell where it is when the phone isnt switched on, they can only monitor it when it is switched on, every 5 minutes or so the phone sends out a signal (try it, put ur mobile next to speakers and u can hear the interference)

TV's also emit a low power signal when connected to an aerial, this helps clear the interference on the signal received. The gadgets the TVL use can pick these signals up if their outside your premises. However, in halls, depending on the location of the telly, they will find it difficult to prove which flat the telly is in, unless they personally come in and check. which leads me onto my final point. The first time they come, they will almost certainly NOT have a warrant to enter your premises. They try and trick you into letting them in ("Do you mind if we come in and check?") to which if you agree to, they are legally allowed to come in. If you ask for a warrant and they dont have/show it, they cant come in. But if this does happen, I suggest you make sure you have a tv license or telly untuned before they revisit.
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suek
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#33
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#33
TV Licensing is actually a matter of criminal law, not civil. It's handled in the magistrates court when it comes to it for non-payment.

The act it all comes from, IIRC states something about equipment being capable of receiving signals, which is a TV. Unless you get nothing but snow when the aerial is out, it's still capable.

I'll be buying a license, just because I don't want any trouble. And to be honest you can't go on forever not buying one - sure you might get away with it whilst in halls but for the rest of your life? It's basically a television tax, rubbish though it may be.
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