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Lying about A-levels? watch

  • View Poll Results: To lie or not to lie about A-levels with future employer.
    Go on - lie. It wont hurt and it'll help you get places.
    26
    23.21%
    DONT DO IT! Its gonna come back and bite you in the ass one day.
    86
    76.79%

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    Yeah try contacting HR by telephone instead of trying online forms
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    (Original post by threeportdrift)
    With CCD at A level and a 2.1 some law firm will employ you. With a dismissal for lying on a CV no law firm will employ you. Lying on a CV is a worse 'crime' than mediocre/poor A level results.

    I suggest you start ringing firms specifically and not rambling through your sob story, but pointing out that although your A levels are weak, your more current and relevant academic achievement is strong and would they accept an application etc.
    It does sound awfully sob doesn't it?! :P I'm not a 'victim' kinda guy at all. I'm very easy going and didn't give much thought to it at the time. However in my current state of frustration I've been reflecting on it, and just wanted to convey that I didn't just horse about for 2 years - I probably was in a position where I could have complained.

    I have never mentioned this to a potential employer by the way. I basically do as you say in interview, as 'passing the blame' and making excuses are not good employee qualities. Rather I just try and draw attention to the fact that my more recent record and previous record is much better. However, it's getting that interview that's difficult. I don't want to start rambling on and drawing attention to my bad a-levels in a cover letter, so what do you suggest?

    It had never even crossed my mind/bothered me until recently. I think maybe before the recession it would have been less of an issue but current job competition in an already incredibly competitive industry is making it impossible.

    As I said, the majority of places I've come across have online forms that don't let me past question 1. I've changed tactic to mailing and calling every local firm but trainee intake is low this year so it's very hard to compete with people with a flawless academic record. It's absurd that grades from 6 years ago are determining my future, but they literally are the only bad point on my CV. My cover letter is excellent and my experience is pretty good, so I can only put it down to this.

    Do you think it is a good idea to draw attention to my terrible grades myself and quickly try and dismiss them? Or do you agree that it might make me look whiney? Do you think maybe cutting the grades off my CV and just leaving the subject title as suggested above might be a better idea?

    And it's CDD btw
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    (Original post by 456789)
    Yeah try contacting HR by telephone instead of trying online forms
    Have tried this. Invariably get referred to the online recruitment process where there are 100 people applying who do meet the criteria.
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    (Original post by mike_freegan)
    Do you think maybe cutting the grades off my CV and just leaving the subject title as suggested above might be a better idea?

    Rather than

    2001-06 Newtown High School, London
    A level Maths (C), Economics (D) and Geography (D)

    just put


    2001-06 Newtown High School, London
    A level Maths, Economics and Geography

    If the rest of your CV is strong then unless they have an in-house scoring sheet they are using, they may well overlook the absence of grades completely. If they are using a scoring system, at least you have made a strong impression before they come back and ask for grades.

    There are always going to be some situations where you are disadvantaged by your A level grades. However, don't dwell on the negatives, learn to build on the positives and be constructive about what you have got to offer.
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    If anyone is interested:

    A-Levels removed from CV as suggested above. Since then I've had a job offer and got another interview. Can't recommend enough.
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    Mike - if all doesn't go well and you're looking for another alternative, one option possibly worth considering is retaking your A-levels. Now you've been through university you should find them somewhat easy!
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    (Original post by ThePants999)
    Mike - if all doesn't go well and you're looking for another alternative, one option possibly worth considering is retaking your A-levels. Now you've been through university you should find them somewhat easy!
    This is very rarely worth doing. You have to look closely at why the employer is asking for A levels in addition to a degree. It certainly isn't as a check of current academic capacity, because (the vast majority of) degrees are harder than A levels. Companies use it as either a filter, or as an indication of continuous academic improvement. In either case, retaking A levels doesn't alter your situation, the filterers are still likely to filter you out by switching to the academic progression reason. They are obviously massively over-subscribed after all.

    A levels are exams aimed at 17/18 year olds, taking them at different ages/stages of life puts them into a different perspective for employers. The fact that you should find them somewhat easy after uni speaks for itself, employers know that as well!
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    (Original post by threeportdrift)
    This is very rarely worth doing. You have to look closely at why the employer is asking for A levels in addition to a degree. It certainly isn't as a check of current academic capacity, because (the vast majority of) degrees are harder than A levels. Companies use it as either a filter, or as an indication of continuous academic improvement. In either case, retaking A levels doesn't alter your situation, the filterers are still likely to filter you out by switching to the academic progression reason. They are obviously massively over-subscribed after all.

    A levels are exams aimed at 17/18 year olds, taking them at different ages/stages of life puts them into a different perspective for employers. The fact that you should find them somewhat easy after uni speaks for itself, employers know that as well!

    Yeah this is my reasoning. I did consider it, but it'd be a lot of work and I think the point is that they want a flawless academic record, not just A-Level knowledge of a subject.

    I only managed a C in the history exam I just retook - although granted that was with about 12 hours of work including reading the book, making notes and trying to memorise them . If the study guide had more than one paragraph between them on the damn 1930's economy I'd probably have got an A or B, as that comprised half of the paper and evidently I knew nothing! I guess that's what happens without attending the class or having course materials - it's impossible to tell where the study guides fall short of the syllabus.

    I do think it might be of benefit resitting though, because most forms just ask how many ucas points you have and don't mention dates. It wouldn't technically be lying - and I wouldn't feel too guilty as easily half of my degree class were mature students and so presumably obtained their UCAS points around my age anyway.
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    totally irrelevant but i was watching a tv series 'suits' and it is about this young man who has an eidetic memory. He gets a job at a law firm lying about going to harvard, later in the series he sees that a man that had lied about his grades and he gets sued by their firm for all the of the money he earned over his lifetime.

    Google brought me here while i was looking for my maths results and this story just kinda popped up in my head.

    Have you got a good job now? and what did you do in the end?

    hope everything worked out for you.
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    Lying on your CV? That's a paddlin'.

    Also, old thread is old, etc, etc.
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    don't fib about the a levels!
    edit: just realized this is an old thread!
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    (Original post by karlos85)
    x
    I know what the stages are, you may lie about your A-levels in the application form and you may get to interview. Provided you are good enough you will even be made an offer but I would not recommend it. You have to provide certificates before you actually start work, for your degree and your A-Levels. When you are asked and you lie about it you have ruined your chances for ever working for that company.

    I'm sorry to say you just need to accept you will not get straight into what you want (it was hard for me to accept this too) If you are as good as you think, get a lower paid job and prove yourself.
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    Old thread someone bumped it
 
 
 
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