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    (Original post by jew unit)
    Actually a brief pumbed search would tell you all you need to know about weed and chemo. Its free to use and very informative. That being said, you didn't exactly back up your statement with any maedical evidence. I'm also mildly suprised that a gappy is giving medical advice.

    Almost everything in medicine is uncertain to a degree, and his particular course of treatment may be unusual. It is posisble that his docs will decide to prescribe the drug as the benefits outweigh the consequences, but they PROBABLY wont as smoking it is PROBABLY going to lower his chances of survival. Either way, stop giving out harmful advice with no information to back you up.
    No, I didn't give specific medical advice, in that I didn't prescribe a dose or anything of that sort. However I did offer impartial guidance, based on medical literature I've read, and personal experience, rather than simply saying words to the effect of 'it will probably make you die sooner, stop being an idiot'.

    I haven't provided links to journals, because frankly the point was moot; the OP didn't ask. My point was just to combat the ignorant post 'one is supposed to kill cancerous cells, the other helps create them...' As I say, THC has been proven to shrink cancerous cells.

    Me being on a gap year has nothing to do with my ability to offer advice on something I happen to know about. I don't need a degree to point someone in the right direction, thanks

    If you actually read my post you will see I advise against smoking. And no, his doctors probably will not offer him a prescription for cannabis or related medication! They're quite possibly just as ignorant as you appear to be, and even if not, the benefits they gain from backing medication from pharmaceutical giants would not be gained. Sadly, doctors are often essentially sales reps these days.

    Please, rather than again, using throw away phrases, show me why my advice is harmful rather than stating it is. And state why it will reduce the length of his life.
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    Touche's medically trained. Listen to him/her.
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    (Original post by jew unit)
    Yeah, good one mate. If you are going through AIDS therapy then you should at least be allowed to use some injected drugs. No, wait...

    And as for confidentiality, doc, the GMC handbook that I have seems to differ with you somewhat on the point. If they are confessing to crimes unrelated to their health then you are within your right to report it.
    What GMC handbook is that? I'd be interested to see what exactly you've misinterpreted.

    http://www.gmc-uk.org/guidance/curre...%20interest%A0

    The potential benefits have to outweigh any damage to the relationship with the patient. Which means the police get a call for killing/raping/bombing and not much else.
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    Because the whole premise of 'drugs are evil' sounds like something out of a P&G or Johnson and Johnson marketing pamphlet. It stinks of 'havn't got a clue what i'm talking about whilst sitting on my middle class arse.' Just look at all the assumptions and mistakes you made in about 50 words....

    - specified a word used 'incorrectly'
    - 'smoking it'
    - Assuming it was me
    - Assuming it was being taken already
    - Confidentiality. Of course it couldnt be broken for that. Moron
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Because the whole premise of 'drugs are evil' sounds like something out of a P&G or Johnson and Johnson marketing pamphlet. It stinks of 'havn't got a clue what i'm talking about whilst sitting on my middle class arse.' Just look at all the assumptions and mistakes you made in about 50 words....

    - specified a word used 'incorrectly'
    - 'smoking it'
    - Assuming it was me
    - Assuming it was being taken already
    - Confidentiality. Of course it couldnt be broken for that. Moron
    To be fair, I think this word might be used mostly in medical circumstances so people might not get it, I only know it due to being from medical background.


    Would you not be willing to talk to the GP on your mother's behalf about it?
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    (Original post by kookoo_koochoo)
    To be fair, I think this word might be used mostly in medical circumstances so people might not get it, I only know it due to being from medical background.


    Would you not be willing to talk to the GP on your mother's behalf about it?
    hmm, I have a different GP/practice from my mum. I did think about it, but I'm not sure that it would be entirely appropriate, or indeed something he could advise upon given the circumstances...
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    hmm, I have a different GP/practice from my mum. I did think about it, but I'm not sure that it would be entirely appropriate, or indeed something he could advise upon given the circumstances...
    Yeah I do understand that it would be difficult to get your point across, especially as you'd be asking on her behalf. But you could bring up the initial point of the painkillers not working, I mean, has your GP exhausted all options already? I know it's not the same - but when my mom was on her chemo she was very physically weak and drained, what the GP prescribed wasn't really helping so she went into the hospital and they put her on a drip to just get fluids and generally replenish her. It could be that what the GP is authorised give out is not strong enough, she might need to talk to the oncologist.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    hmm, I have a different GP/practice from my mum. I did think about it, but I'm not sure that it would be entirely appropriate, or indeed something he could advise upon given the circumstances...
    I wouldn't have thought that was appropriate myself but what do I know.

    My advice is to listen to people like Touche who know what they're talking about; there are so many ********s on here who have been conditioned to think that cannabis is tantamount to pure evil and who are incapable of giving informed advice. By their logic smoking one cigarette or drinking a pint of beer is going to seriously increase your chances of getting ill. :rolleyes:

    I hope your mother pulls through the chemo and that any medication she does go onto take helps with the pain.
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    (Original post by Faith In Chaos)
    No, I didn't give specific medical advice, in that I didn't prescribe a dose or anything of that sort. However I did offer impartial guidance, based on medical literature I've read, and personal experience, rather than simply saying words to the effect of 'it will probably make you die sooner, stop being an idiot'.

    I haven't provided links to journals, because frankly the point was moot; the OP didn't ask. My point was just to combat the ignorant post 'one is supposed to kill cancerous cells, the other helps create them...' As I say, THC has been proven to shrink cancerous cells.

    Me being on a gap year has nothing to do with my ability to offer advice on something I happen to know about. I don't need a degree to point someone in the right direction, thanks

    If you actually read my post you will see I advise against smoking. And no, his doctors probably will not offer him a prescription for cannabis or related medication! They're quite possibly just as ignorant as you appear to be, and even if not, the benefits they gain from backing medication from pharmaceutical giants would not be gained. Sadly, doctors are often essentially sales reps these days.

    Please, rather than again, using throw away phrases, show me why my advice is harmful rather than stating it is. And state why it will reduce the length of his life.
    You have read literiature that seems to indicate some effect of massive doses of THC halting cell cycle progression and possibly promoting apotosis and grossly misinterpreted it. Go to pubmed and searh THC cancer and that should give you some twelve pages of conflicting studies on the matter. However, not having been trained in how to read these studies you will doubtless be unable to distinguish between those of value and those with none.

    And then we get to the meat of this issue: mistrust of doctors. There is no pharmaceutical conspiracy involving doctors. They get no money from pharm companies in this country and are under no pressure to use their drugs other than the occasional lavish pitch from a sales rep. If they think survival will be improved by the use of cannabis, then they can and will prescirbe it.

    As for papers:
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3009125?ordinalpos=1&itool=Entre zSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_R esultsPanel.Pubmed_DiscoveryPane l.Pubmed_Discovery_RA&linkpos=1& log$=relatedarticles&logdbfrom=p ubmed

    should be good enough to be going on with.

    You will find something on there about glioma cells and regression upon administration of THC. Some of the papers appear sound at the first reading, but this is some way off the statement that THC has been proven as an effective anti cancer therapy.
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    (Original post by Touche)
    What GMC handbook is that? I'd be interested to see what exactly you've misinterpreted.

    http://www.gmc-uk.org/guidance/curre...%20interest%A0

    The potential benefits have to outweigh any damage to the relationship with the patient. Which means the police get a call for killing/raping/bombing and not much else.
    It depends on your interpretation of harm to the d-p relationship and the harm to the profession as a whole. That passage is somewhat open, but it was specified by our staff that you are welcome to report criminal activity when confessed in a non medical setting. I may perhaps have got this wrong and I'm therefore willing to retract my previous statement.
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    With regards to whoever mentioned weed in the reduction nausea, it isn't the be all and end all, there are other, safer, legal drugs that can reduce the effects of nausea when undergoing chemotherapy. There are also other ways of reducing stress and if someone was undergoing chemotherapy I would think that one of the healthcare professionals looking after them, could refer them to someone who could help them with stress relief in finding an individual outlet, because stress is very different for every person.

    Cannibis is illegal for a reason, whether or not anyone agrees with it, however if someone was undergoing chemo and insisted on smoking cannibis I don't think there would be much that a healthcare professional could do other than advise them not to. I've looked after people with COPD who leave the ward several times a day to go outside and smoke and people with diabetes who refuse to manage their sugar intake and bariatric patients who persist in eating lots of the wrong things and refusing to exercise, despite the advice that they are given.
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    (Original post by Lady Jennington)
    Cannibis is illegal for a reason, whether or not anyone agrees with it, however if someone was undergoing chemo and insisted on smoking cannibis I don't think there would be much that a healthcare professional could do other than advise them not to. I've looked after people with COPD who leave the ward several times a day to go outside and smoke and people with diabetes who refuse to manage their sugar intake and bariatric patients who persist in eating lots of the wrong things and refusing to exercise, despite the advise that they are given.
    The average patient.
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    (Original post by kookoo_koochoo)
    Yeah I do understand that it would be difficult to get your point across, especially as you'd be asking on her behalf. But you could bring up the initial point of the painkillers not working, I mean, has your GP exhausted all options already? I know it's not the same - but when my mom was on her chemo she was very physically weak and drained, what the GP prescribed wasn't really helping so she went into the hospital and they put her on a drip to just get fluids and generally replenish her. It could be that what the GP is authorised give out is not strong enough, she might need to talk to the oncologist.
    To be really honest I'm quite cowardly and hate getting involved in hospitals and all that. Even the baldness disturbs me...I've got no idea where she is with the GP honestly; I don't get involved. I just see her constantly knackered and unwell, and thought a bit of space cake might help out a bit.

    Cheers danny
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    To be really honest I'm quite cowardly and hate getting involved in hospitals and all that. Even the baldness disturbs me...I've got no idea where she is with the GP honestly; I don't get involved. I just see her constantly knackered and unwell, and thought a bit of space cake might help out a bit.

    Cheers danny
    I know how you feel, it was really hard for me as well cos it's not a way you want to see your own parent, and after all they have done for you it's as if there is nothing you can do to help them when this is really when they need you the most. It used to kill me inside, so I avoided my mother, which was WRONG of me. I know it's not the same as medication - but you just helping her out, acting normal, and giving her all the support she needs will make the world of difference to her, maybe not physically but psychologically and when she's well again she will never forget what you have done for her.
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    (Original post by kookoo_koochoo)
    The average patient.
    Not at all, there are very few people I have nursed who have come under this category, most people will adhere to the advice given to them, atleast while in hospital because the environment is favourable to do that, it's when people go home that is normally the time things go to pot.

    Most recently I looked after a lady who had a stroke and got away quite lucky, she had full mobilisation (although did have 2 falls) and communication and only suffered slight confusion, on having an MRI scan doctors revealed a growing clot in her carotid which threatened to block the artery and cause a further stroke at any time, this lady self discharged because her and her family's main concern was that she was not going to be able to have enough cigarettes while in hospital. However, in 7weeks doing 30hrs a week on that unit that was the first time I'd come across a patient who didn't want to listen to the advice given.
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    (Original post by Lady Jennington)
    Not at all, there are very few people I have nursed who have come under this category, most people will adhere to the advice given to them, atleast while in hospital because the environment is favourable to do that, it's when people go home that is normally the time things go to pot.

    Most recently I looked after a lady who had a stroke and got away quite lucky, she had full mobilisation (although did have 2 falls) and communication and only suffered slight confusion, on having an MRI scan doctors revealed a growing clot in her carotid which threatened to block the artery and cause a further stroke at any time, this lady self discharged because her and her family's main concern was that she was not going to be able to have enough cigarettes while in hospital. However, in 7weeks doing 30hrs a week on that unit that was the first time I'd come across a patient who didn't want to listen to the advice given.

    I dunno most of the patients my dad treats for glaucoma (he's an ophthalmologist) are diabetics who just do not follow advice given to them, my own grandmother/mother don't follow advice given to them from the doctor whether it's to do with something like diet or post-operative recovery. Yeah I agree it's probably when they are at home but having the ability to self discharge doesn't help a lot. I dunno, working in a GP office I have cme across a lot of people like that, loads don't even take their blood pressure medication or they take about 4 at a time and then not for a few day, it's a human flaw, not listening to what is best for you.

    I hope that woman is alright..
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    Even if there is a fully qualified oncologist on this forum, and on this thread, do you really think they can give advice over the internet?
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    (Original post by jew unit)
    Err...actually they probably can break confidentiality on this one. They probably wont, but its not medically related in any way. You can't confess crimes to a doc and expect them to stay quiet.
    Yes you can, provided there's no public safety risk - i.e. tell your doctor that you smoke weed, just don't tell them you drive school buses while on it.
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    u only live once mate.
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    Cancer and Chemotherapy is serious. So i wouldn't recommend smoking Weed,whilst undergoing Chemotherapy

    Can't believe anyone would
 
 
 
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