Turn on thread page Beta

How many Americans? watch

Announcements
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Lady Leviathan)
    St. Andrews was the only international university that sent a representative to my school's "College Fair".

    I came over here because I wanted "adventure" and all that. I wanted to do something different. I'm really happy with the choices I've made... however... I do miss the US and I don't think that the UK is "a gajillion" times better than the US at all.
    I loved being in the US its like one of them places thats good for a short time but Id miss England,

    The same for you I guess, England is cool for a while but america is your home!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    There are certain good things about the UK and certain really crap things about the UK. Any part of the world is like that.

    No place beats home, though... At least in my opinion. I didn't realize how much I would miss all of it -- friends, family, the places I go to shop, the food I eat, the familiarity of my town, the proximity to New York City, the things to do, my dog, etc. -- stuff like that.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I'll try to keep this short, but there's a lot that went into my decision.

    As with Lady Leviathan, I am an American from Connecticut. I bounced around to a few different Universities in the US and eventually completed a BSc and an MSc in Applied Physiology (Sport Science). I was originally prepping myself to go on for a Ph.D. but I started to find myself really bored with my field. There aren't a lot of jobs for my specialization, and the pay and benefits for the few that I've had were horrendous. After being an adjunct professor for a couple semesters I realized that academia was not something I really wanted to pursue .. the quality of students have gone down and I realized that, again, my field is so specialized that there would not be a lot of job choices for Universities I could work at anyways.

    I decided to take a few career tests and they all pointed to business, specifically marketing. I work in health care, so I spoke with a few patients of mine that were in the business field and they all agreed that marketing was up my alley and were even going to suggest it to me. I did a couple of informational interviews to get the feel of it, and once I decided it would be a good fit I went on the job hunt. Unfortunately the job market is weak, with some companies putting in hiring freezes till Q4. The jobs that were available I didn't want to do (selling life insurance) , and the jobs hat interested me the most all listed 'BA in business, MBA preferred'.

    While still job hunting, I decided to look into some MBA programs. In the US it would take 2 yrs and would cost roughly $80-150k depending on the school. I have some UK friends (most live here, but some are overseas) and they told me that it would only take a year over there, and I always wanted to study abroad when I was younger and was craving a change of environment so I started to look into schools overseas. I found a few schools that looked pretty good and sent my application in on a whim, not really expecting much to come of it since they were both ranked top 50 in the world for a global MBA.

    Ends up I made it into one of the programs, and after much debate with close friends and some business people, I decided to go for it. The positives are it's cheaper than doing it in the US, it's only a year, an MBA will open up a lot more doors even if marketing doesn't pan out, I'll have international exposure, and who knows when I'll be able to have a chance to live overseas again. The negatives are the cost, while still cheaper than the US is still expensive, and from what I've read/heard there is poor job placement if I come back to the states, so that'll be left up to me.

    Sorry, tried to make it shorter but it's tough to leave out some details!
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    My story? I'm from Miami. I joined TSR when I was 13 because at that age I was really keen on studying law in the UK and wanted to know more. I have always been an Anglophile especially after I started reading the Harry Potter books. :p: To this day, I still would like to study law in the UK as an undergraduate becuase it's more central on what I want to study. I don't really care much about studying subjects which I will never have to use in my career. However, it's proving to be more expensive than what I can afford. So I will probably take the GDL/CPE route. I am currently a junior in High School, in the IB program. I joined IB because I knew it would be one of the things that would qualify myself for unis in the UK. Whether or not I go to UK as an undergrad, I will end up as a solicitor.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    I'm an American too, applied to the UK for undergrad but I didn't get in anywhere my parents would have consented to (aka Oxbridge or LSE), so I'm finishing up my degree in California (Class of 2009, wootttt). I'm becoming more happy with this decision, now that its ben a year, and um, I love liberal arts degrees/their flexibility apparently.

    Um, yes, back to studying for summer school finals!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by forpolarbears)
    I'm an American too, applied to the UK for undergrad but I didn't get in anywhere my parents would have consented to (aka Oxbridge or LSE), so I'm finishing up my degree in California (Class of 2009, wootttt). I'm becoming more happy with this decision, now that its ben a year, and um, I love liberal arts degrees/their flexibility apparently.

    Um, yes, back to studying for summer school finals!
    where does France come in?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I'm from Kentucky. I'll be finished with my undergrad degree in the spring (B.F.A. Playwriting). I spent last summer studying in London, and absolutely fell in love with the place. I'm looking at graduate schools for screenwriting at the moment and am planning on applying to a few in the UK.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    My story's long but I'll try and keep it short.

    I'm was born in New York City and lived there until I was fourteen. My parents aren't American and my mother's a Belgian diplomat so when I was thirteen she moved to Iran and then Uganda.

    My high school experience ended up being that every year of high school was in a different school in a different country. The breakdown being:

    America, Belgium, England and Uganda, not to mention spending summers in Iran and France.

    I had my best year of high school in England and it's cheaper for me (being an EU citizen via my mother) to attend school there. I did the typical English thing and took a GAP year and now I'll be attending Queen Mary's in September. Couldn't be happier, to be honest.

    I foresee a lot more moving around in my future (St. Petersburg and Rome attract...) but I doubt I'll ever move back to the US permanently. It's my home and I feel at home there but having lived in so many places, I have a very different outlook than most Americans and I feel I don't quite fit in with them anymore.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by LadyLari)
    My story's long but I'll try and keep it short.

    I'm was born in New York City and lived there until I was fourteen. My parents aren't American and my mother's a Belgian diplomat so when I was thirteen she moved to Iran and then Uganda.

    My high school experience ended up being that every year of high school was in a different school in a different country. The breakdown being:

    America, Belgium, England and Uganda, not to mention spending summers in Iran and France.

    I had my best year of high school in England and it's cheaper for me (being an EU citizen via my mother) to attend school there. I did the typical English thing and took a GAP year and now I'll be attending Queen Mary's in September. Couldn't be happier, to be honest.

    I foresee a lot more moving around in my future (St. Petersburg and Rome attract...) but I doubt I'll ever move back to the US permanently. It's my home and I feel at home there but having lived in so many places, I have a very different outlook than most Americans and I feel I don't quite fit in with them anymore.
    wow! it's quite anazing that you lived in so many diff countries, and studied theree... I would love to be able to understand so many diff cultures...
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by 123monster)
    wow! it's quite anazing that you lived in so many diff countries, and studied theree... I would love to be able to understand so many diff cultures...
    Yeah, it wasn't the easiest thing to do but it was a rewarding experience.

    I noticed you wanted to go to boarding school in England. I went to boarding school in England so if you have any questions about it, just ask.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by LadyLari)
    Yeah, it wasn't the easiest thing to do but it was a rewarding experience.

    I noticed you wanted to go to boarding school in England. I went to boarding school in England so if you have any questions about it, just ask.
    at this point I don't even know what I want to do anymore... It's all too confusing...
    how did you find boarding school? you think it'll be a good idea for me to go?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by 123monster)
    at this point I don't even know what I want to do anymore... It's all too confusing...
    how did you find boarding school? you think it'll be a good idea for me to go?
    I loved boarding school and I think it's a great idea if you enjoy independence and you can discipline yourself (to do work, I mean). I assume, since you've been homeschooled, that you can discipline yourself. Anyway, I had a great time there and I would do it again in a heartbeat. :yep:
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I joined tsr when the forum I was on got shut down. It was student-run and the students who ran it graduated and took all their hardware with them. I live in Austin and am studying physics at UT
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Gaylei)
    I was just wondering how many americans are on here?

    If you are an american on here, whats your story? Are you in england, america, some where else, at uni or college or school or something else all together?
    American - Studying In WMC in NYC, now in Amman, Jordan w/ Family
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by LadyLari)
    I loved boarding school and I think it's a great idea if you enjoy independence and you can discipline yourself (to do work, I mean). I assume, since you've been homeschooled, that you can discipline yourself. Anyway, I had a great time there and I would do it again in a heartbeat. :yep:
    sounds good... I was wondering... how challenging did you find the academics?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by 123monster)
    sounds good... I was wondering... how challenging did you find the academics?
    Well, I did the IB (International Baccalaureate) so, it was rather challenging. However, the school I went to had the option to do A-Levels, and from what I could tell, that was significantly less challenging. However, I personally think I would have done poorly as an A-Level student because I'm a bad test taker and you have to have more frequent exams.
    I think it depends on what kind of student you are. Depending on how old you are...you might still have to do GCSE's first, and there are quite a lot of subjects but again, they seemed pretty easy to me
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by LadyLari)
    Well, I did the IB (International Baccalaureate) so, it was rather challenging. However, the school I went to had the option to do A-Levels, and from what I could tell, that was significantly less challenging. However, I personally think I would have done poorly as an A-Level student because I'm a bad test taker and you have to have more frequent exams.
    I think it depends on what kind of student you are. Depending on how old you are...you might still have to do GCSE's first, and there are quite a lot of subjects but again, they seemed pretty easy to me
    I'm 13... that would put me at gcse's which I'm not really interested in.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Welcome Americans! I love your accents and style so much!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by 123monster)
    I'm 13... that would put me at gcse's which I'm not really interested in.
    In that case I suggest waiting and doing boarding school in 11th and 12th grade.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ILikeToHaveFun)
    Welcome Americans! I love your accents and style so much!
    Which accents? We have many kinds. We have southern drawl, new england accents, and a neutral mid-western accent which I have.

    Also, what style are you talking about? From my experience, we have Europe's styles, just a decade late
 
 
 
Poll
Have you ever experienced bullying?
Useful resources
US study forum

Accommodation profiles:

iQ Student Accommodation

iQ Student Accommodation

Great value student rooms in city centre locations all across the UK


X1 Lettings

X1 Lettings

Luxury student accommodation in Liverpool & Manchester.


Collegiate Accommodation

Collegiate Accommodation

"This is student living. Just better."


Scape Student Living

Study Inn

Providing stunning high quality, boutique student accommodation throughout the UK


The Student Housing Company

The Student Housing Company

Award-winning student accommodation - voted by 22,000 students.

Groups associated with this forum:

View associated groups

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.