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    (Original post by trance addict)
    Yeah but do universities even care how crap your school was? I think oxbridge are starting to recognise going to a **** comp and coming out with at least straight A's has meant you've had to do a lot more than 'mr private school kid' with straight A/A*s

    A lot of my school have no aspirations etc and generally don't care.. It's hard to push yourself in a school like that and i've taught myself a lot of the syllabus for many of my GCSE subjects. Just happy I won't have to do the same for A level!
    Well for history at least it's nigh on impossible to get into oxbridge/durham/lse without at least a few A*'s (6-8 in Durham's case). Clearly they would rather have somebody who's as thick as pig **** but has been private schooled than somebody who's as bright as a button but who's parents didn't have 10-30k to spend on their education.

    I found everything too easy in my school so I miss behaved a fair amount, as school got harder I began to behave more and more but it was never hard enough because even in top set there were people destined for D's and E's. Top set should be a place of freedom away from tools but it's just not.
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    (Original post by AnythingButChardonnay)
    Well, that's my point - bad! If you were unlucky enough to end up at the local crappy comp then that'd be you rather stuffed. Most parents would work their balls off to avoid that happening, but not all (can).

    Hence why I support grammar schools.
    I wish we still had the 11+ as well. I ended up at a crap school with a low pass rate but nevertheless it was still the best in my area without travelling a few miles.
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    (Original post by Elipsis)
    Well for history at least it's nigh on impossible to get into oxbridge/durham/lse without at least a few A*'s (6-8 in Durham's case). Clearly they would rather have somebody who's as thick as pig **** but has been private schooled than somebody who's as bright as a button but who's parents didn't have 10-30k to spend on their education.

    I found everything too easy in my school so I miss behaved a fair amount, as school got harder I began to behave more and more but it was never hard enough because even in top set there were people destined for D's and E's. Top set should be a place of freedom away from tools but it's just not.
    True, but I know that Cambridge definitly adjust your GCSE score depending on the kind of school you went to. I think you might even be able to apply through CSAS if it was that bad.
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    Wow....I really value my school now! omg...I cant believe how low they are!! I can pass an exam by just reading the CGP guide!! How can the people not have any ambition to do well???
    Very suprising figures, didnt expect that many schools!
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    (Original post by Elipsis)
    I think the idea of the plan is that you raise the competance of people regarded as thick, and keep raising it and raising it. Of course in all the schools on that list it's like trying to get water from a stone.
    Yes. But grades are about numbers. So if everyone improved then the standards for getting a C would rise. And, what's happening at the moment is more people are getting top grades without the standards actually rising.
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    (Original post by trance addict)
    True, but I know that Cambridge definitly adjust your GCSE score depending on the kind of school you went to. I think you might even be able to apply through CSAS if it was that bad.
    I know a few people who applied through that, the thing with that is that it's not just the school you went to but your parents income that's taken into account. As if the fact my parents earn 10k extra has any bareing on how well I did at school.
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    I do see that point. But assume all schools were brought up to 'average' standard, there would still be some schools doing much better than others and so the standards would be changed yet again. It's not a fixed goal.
    And the thickarses have to go somewhere, it's not all the school's fault. Probability makes it likely that there will be the odd school with an unusually large number of them. It's better to have them all in one place than spread out and bringing others down with them! Although I'm sure the government in their wisdom would prefer that.
    think for a second: the population of most secondary schools are too large and cover too large a geographical area for the proportion of thickarses, as you so elegantly put it, to be so overwhelming.
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    (Original post by AnythingButChardonnay)
    Yes. But grades are about numbers. So if everyone improved then the standards for getting a C would rise. And, what's happening at the moment is more people are getting top grades without the standards actually rising.
    A C is supposed to be the acceptable level of English/Maths required from a student upon leaving school, they don't moderate it very much either way. If by some sort of miracle all the children in these ****e schools got 100% in the tests they'd still all get A*s.
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    (Original post by Elipsis)
    I wish we still had the 11+ as well. I ended up at a crap school with a low pass rate but nevertheless it was still the best in my area without travelling a few miles.
    I go to a crappy school as well. It is an independent school but the pass rate is as low as many comprehensives. I was fortunate enough to voluntarily go there, which is better than many people!
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    (Original post by Elipsis)
    A C is supposed to be the acceptable level of English/Maths required from a student upon leaving school, they don't moderate it very much either way. If by some sort of miracle all the children in these ****e schools got 100% in the tests they'd still all get A*s.
    Indeed! Only in exams where you get full marks can you, effectively, guarantee a grade. If you got 99% you could, theoretically, fail if everyone did really well.
    That's why I think this whole C business is rubbish, because it's not a set standard. It's not "you must be able to do ___ to get a C" but rather "You might have to be able to do ___ to get a C, unless everyone else does worse than you."
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    (Original post by AnythingButChardonnay)
    Well, that's my point - bad! If you were unlucky enough to end up at the local crappy comp then that'd be you rather stuffed. Most parents would work their balls off to avoid that happening, but not all (can).

    Hence why I support grammar schools.
    alot of kids these days have the **** tutored out of them so even the "grammar on ability & merit" system doesn't work anymore.
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    (Original post by made_of_fail)
    think for a second: the population of most secondary schools are too large and cover too large a geographical area for the proportion of thickarses, as you so elegantly put it, to be so overwhelming.
    Well clearly there are exceptions such as that 1% school. As anyone with a C in maths should know(:rolleyes:), in statistics there are abnormalities.

    I'm quite flattered I'm elegant. Though I accept I'm not eloquent.
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    My school got 36% in 2005, but 47% in 2007 and I think (hope) our year will be even higher. It's luck of the draw, whether or not the clever people choose to go to the (relatively) local grammar or not I think.
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    I also find the amount quite shocking! 33 in kent! lol. But it all depends on the work ethic of the students and teachers of the year, it can change!
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    my mum used to work at one of the schools on the list, she know workes at a private prep school

    however some of thoughts schools have specialist status which my school has been trying to get but couldn't ofsted put it in to special measure but it as the quickest school in england to get out of special measure and is not on that list
    there are 5 schools on the list from my area

    but there must be something wrong with the education system in england as one school only had 3% blakeston school stockton-on-tees
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    (Original post by Elipsis)
    Well for history at least it's nigh on impossible to get into oxbridge/durham/lse without at least a few A*'s (6-8 in Durham's case). Clearly they would rather have somebody who's as thick as pig **** but has been private schooled than somebody who's as bright as a button but who's parents didn't have 10-30k to spend on their education.
    I was pretty amazed my sister didn't get in to Durham, 11A*s and 2As!


    Anyway, I think it has a lot to do with the area the school is in, many areas will have a high number of non English speakers, so won't be getting Cs in English. I think that it needs to be a lot more on a case by case basis. GCSE grades don't really show how good a school is, but I suppose it is a lot easier for the government.
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    Hah, I used to go to one of the schools below 10%
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    (Original post by AnythingButChardonnay)
    I do see that point. But assume all schools were brought up to 'average' standard, there would still be some schools doing much better than others and so the standards would be changed yet again. It's not a fixed goal.
    And the thickarses have to go somewhere, it's not all the school's fault. Probability makes it likely that there will be the odd school with an unusually large number of them. It's better to have them all in one place than spread out and bringing others down with them! Although I'm sure the government in their wisdom would prefer that.
    I've found that comprehensives can lead to success for the high-fliers but only really when setting is adequate. Sitting in a class of mixed-ability people for French for three years, where many can barely conjugate a regular verb was frustrating; but in other subjects where we'd been placed in sets it was a lot easier to get on and achieve.

    I disagree with the government's plans. I think they should let schools get on with what they're best at. If the headteacher is incompetent at running the school in a way that it impedes the results, then it's the governors' job to sort that out, not the government's.
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    (Original post by *Miss-Brightside*)
    Wow there's soooooo many. Some as low as 10% :-O

    That is shocking.

    Birmingham has tonnes!
    Kent Local Authority has the most.

    Over a third of its school are classed as 'failing' using the bench mark of 5 passes including English and Maths.

    A damning indictment of a wholly academically selective system of education.:mad:
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    Wow, what?
    My school isn't on there, and it was basically made out of cardboard. There were a lot of clever and well educated kids there, but then really, it's surely to do with the area and parents as opposed to the schools themselves failing...
 
 
 
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