univeristy rankings and later problems... Watch

WOLLSMOTH
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#21
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#21
(Original post by River85)
Nope, you're the one who doesn't know what they're talking about. You're still at uni, yes? You're not even IN employment, let alone an employer yourself.

How do you know I'm not an employer, you don't know me?

An employer is far more concerned with skills and experience, plus performance in the degree and, possibly, relevance of the degree. Only 25% of employers take university prestige into account when targeting grad recreuitment. This is FACT! Some would say even 25% is too high.

Also, you fail to miss something, these are not domestic universities, they are forgeign universities. If the OP is planning on working in the UK employers generally wouldn't have a clue about the difference between the two.

So, instead of bickering, what makes you qualified enough to make your statments. I've worked in various areas (including some national law firms) and know a range of employers.

What about you?
The FACT is that only 10% of graduates from poor universities get into graduate level jobs.

I would certainly consider going to a good university of incredible importance.

You're telling people Uni rep doesn't matter to increase your chances of a job. Thats very sly.
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titanlux
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#22
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Right. I'm not going into employment right now... I'm really asking whether the uni makes a big difference when applying for a PhD (hopefully at somewhere even better)?
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River85
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#23
(Original post by WOLLSMOTH)
The FACT is that only 10% on graduates from poor universities get into graduate level jobs.
Graduate level job? Define a graduate level job? There are very few jobs where a degree really is necessary. There are many people from poor university/ex-polys entering professions where a degree is pretty miuch necessary. I know it's far more than 10%.

There's also a great deal of talent and potential in law at a number of ex-polys (including Northumbria). They can certainly pack a punch

(Original post by WOLLSMOTH)
You're telling people Uni rep doesn't matter to increase your chances of a job. Thats very sly.
What? That doesn't even make sense! For a start I'm at a "higher ranked" uni than you :rolleyes:

You see, just because I claim that uni rep isn't everything (or even particularly important) you assume I'm at a "crap" uni. Does it boggle your mind thinking that some people who are at top unis don't need to look down at others, or perpetuate the myth that those at "poorer" universities are destined to failure in careers.

By the way, your profile confirms you're just a troll, or at least just a prat. OP take no notice of this fool.
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River85
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(Original post by titanlux)
Right. I'm not going into employment right now... I'm really asking whether the uni makes a big difference when applying for a PhD (hopefully at somewhere even better)?
The rep of the uni itself won't a great deal (if any), no.
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TSRreader
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#25
(Original post by titanlux)
I used the Jiao Tong 2007 and the www.topuniversities.com league tables.

Why does it make such a huge difference when doing the PhD application and interviews?
No, neither Times Higher Supplement nor Shanghai Jiao Tong have a clue of different university's standing for different subject's academia.

You need to find an international department ranking, best done by an university's professor, for your subject. Those rankings will give you a general view of how other university's professors view those two universities' standing in academia for your subject.

The better your department, the better chance you will find a famous professor that can give you a good LOR for PhD.

Btw, an university that has a better standing in academia doesn't mean employers will value it just as much as professors do. So I don't think you can find an efficient league table that can show both. And I doubt employers will use Time Higher or Shanghai Jiao Tong because neither of the two tabulate data that can show how competent a prospective employee will be.

In terms of employment, you should look at their local league tables for each uni. I think you can give some trust to those tables - unlike in UK, ppl tends to rank their local uni with heavier weight to student's caliber other than student's happiness and spending on new equipment.
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WOLLSMOTH
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(Original post by River85)
Graduate level job? Define a graduate level job? There are very few jobs where a degree really is necessary. There are many people from poor university/ex-polys entering professions where a degree is pretty miuch necessary. I know it's far more than 10%.

There's also a great deal of talent and potential in law at a number of ex-polys (including Northumbria). They can certainly pack a punch



What? That doesn't even make sense! For a start I'm at a "higher ranked" uni than you :rolleyes:

You see, just because I claim that uni rep isn't everything (or even particularly important) you assume I'm at a "crap" uni. Does it boggle your mind thinking that some people who are at top unis don't need to look down at others, or perpetuate the myth that those at "poorer" universities are destined to failure in careers.

By the way, your profile confirms you're just a troll, or at least just a prat. OP take no notice of this fool.
You think Durham is good lol?

Employers consider Nottingham better than Durham for finance son
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titanlux
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#27
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#27
(Original post by TSRreader)
No, neither Times Higher Supplement nor Shanghai Jiao Tong have a clue of different university's standing for different subject's academia.

You need to find an international department ranking, best done by an university's professor, for your subject. Those rankings will give you a general view of how other university's professors view those two universities' standing in academia for your subject.

The better your department, the better chance you will find a famous professor that can give you a good LOR for PhD.

Btw, an university that has a better standing in academia doesn't mean employers will value it just as much as professors do. So I don't think you can find an efficient league table that can show both. And I doubt employers will use Time Higher or Shanghai Jiao Tong because neither of the two tabulate data that can show how competent a prospective employee will be.

In terms of employment, you should look at their local league tables for each uni. I think you can give some trust to those tables - unlike in UK, ppl tends to rank their local uni with heavier weight to student's caliber other than student's happiness and spending on new equipment.
Very interesting and probably the most salient yet. I suppose it swings in roundabouts then... for a great LOR the department need to get to know me very well, so the less people on the course better. But if i wanted to stay there say for a PhD (just because there would be less competition) then I'd need a small department with lots of funding. What do you think the difference between a 1 year and a 2 year masters is in the same subject? Perhaps in terms of looking at it from a perspective of a PhD, bearing in mind that the masters subject is in something very different to my BSc.
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ChemistBoy
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#28
(Original post by WOLLSMOTH)
Don't listen to people saying league tables dont matter, they're just bawwwing because their Uni performs poorly in their subject choice/ overall.
Eh? You do realise I have a degree from the university you are studying at?

League tables are awful and correlate little with what academics think. Generally academics have a mental list of 'good' universities and 'bad' universities usually formed by which universities have research active staff in their field broadly speaking. However, I've really not seen any evidence that this is massively influential in PhD candidate selection, at least in my field.
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TSRreader
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(Original post by titanlux)
Very interesting and probably the most salient yet. I suppose it swings in roundabouts then... for a great LOR the department need to get to know me very well, so the less people on the course better. But if i wanted to stay there say for a PhD (just because there would be less competition) then I'd need a small department with lots of funding. What do you think the difference between a 1 year and a 2 year masters is in the same subject? Perhaps in terms of looking at it from a perspective of a PhD, bearing in mind that the masters subject is in something very different to my BSc.
Most of the time, a prospective PhD would choose a 2 year master over a 1 year master if both departments have more or less similar research expertise in the subject. I think there's more time to build a relationship between you and your professor in a 2 years. Since I don't know your courses' contents but I speculate there's a greater chance of getting more research done in a 2 year master. These two things can come very useful to a prospective PhD. Presuming both contents are similar, a 1 year master would save time therefore a much better chance for employment as employers would want you to have an one year of work experience instead of using on research.
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River85
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(Original post by WOLLSMOTH)
You think Durham is good lol?

Employers consider Nottingham better than Durham for finance son
I don't deny that, son. Although only marginally, son.

OP (and WOLLSMOTH) listen to ChemistBoy, the man speaks sense.

OP, do you prefer one over the other at this present time?
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WOLLSMOTH
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#31
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(Original post by River85)


I don't deny that, son. Although only marginally, son.

OP (and WOLLSMOTH) listen to ChemistBoy, the man speaks sense.

OP, do you prefer one over the other at this present time?
And what credentials does ChemistBoy have?
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thatwhichiam
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#32
(Original post by WOLLSMOTH)
And what credentials does ChemistBoy have?
A PhD.
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River85
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#33
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#33
(Original post by WOLLSMOTH)
And what credentials does ChemistBoy have?
(Original post by thatwhichiam)
A PhD.
Exactly

I did try to tell you in that PM.
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ChemistBoy
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#34
(Original post by WOLLSMOTH)
And what credentials does ChemistBoy have?
I'm a postdoctoral researcher in the physics department at Nottingham.
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prospectivEEconomist
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bad man..
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TSRreader
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#36
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(Original post by WOLLSMOTH)
You think Durham is good lol?

Employers consider Nottingham better than Durham for finance son
Please don't confuse economics with finance. Economics belongs to the Social Science Department but finance is part of the business school.

http://rankings.ft.com/european-busi...chool-rankings

This a ranking done by financial times, a much well reputed magazine in the financial circle than Guardian, Times or Independent.

Edit: I meant Nott's Economics has it own department, so its reputation is separate from Nott's Business School.
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tucker672
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#37
(Original post by WOLLSMOTH)
don't go for low table ranks..

Go for THE BEST if you want a good job.

Don't listen to people saying league tables dont matter, they're just bawwwing because their Uni performs poorly in their subject choice/ overall.
WTF surely it will look better, to get a first in the 369th than a first in the 9th :confused:
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prospectivEEconomist
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#38
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Nottingham is ahead in the pure MBA 07 table..
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WOLLSMOTH
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(Original post by TSRreader)
Please don't confuse economics with finance. Economics belongs to the Social Science Department but finance is part of the business school.

http://rankings.ft.com/european-busi...chool-rankings

This a ranking done by financial times, a much well reputed magazine in the financial circle than Guardian, Times or Independent.

Edit: I meant Nott's Economics has it own department, so its reputation is separate from Nott's Business School.
BY FINANCE I OBVIOUSLY MEAN THE FINANCE INDUSTRY
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Garden_Gnome
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#40
(Original post by tucker672)
WTF surely it will look better, to get a first in the 369th than a first in the 9th :confused:
Not necessarily. Besides, the OP is looking to do a masters there, not an undergrad degree.

Academics or employers are unlikely to have a list with them to know which uni are where. That said I'm aware of Copenhagen but not the other one (in Barcelona). I can't imagine it would make too much of a difference.
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