First Year LSE student jailed for three years! Watch

faber niger
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#21
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#21
(Original post by andy_1989)
It has been rumored that this will cause LSE to drop in rankings significantly, many investment banks have already black listed LSE. Sad times.
Erm... no.

Unless you're being sarcastic, in which case, erm... yes.
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The Dark Side
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#22
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#22
(Original post by aperson)
i think he was joking...relax
I didn't sense any sarcasm so I took it literally. Anyway it doesn't really matter I guess.
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DannyBoy123
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#23
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#23
You've got to feel for the guy, gambling can be a terrible addiction and drive people to crazy lengths. It's a shame that no one at LSE realised the problems he had and tried to help him deal with them before they got this out of hand.

Taking my liberal hat off now, he does deserve whatever sentence he has to serve and hopefully he will get some help in or after prison.
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smoosabitmega
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#24
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#24
(Original post by andy_1989)
It has been rumored that this will cause LSE to drop in rankings significantly, many investment banks have already black listed LSE. Sad times.

how did so few pick up on the sarcasm???! ^
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TSRreader
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#25
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#25
(Original post by DannyBoy123)
YIt's a shame that no one at LSE realised the problems he had and tried to help him deal with them before they got this out of hand.
If according to the report, he really hated his addiction how come he didn't ask for any help? I kind of question whether he actually regretted about his action until he was caught. If that's the case then he seriously needed to serve his sentence because at his age, he should have enough maturity to question his action before meeting the consequences.
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DannyBoy123
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#26
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#26
Hating an addiction is not reason enough to stop. Do you think people enjoy being enslaved by something like gambling or drugs? Of course they don't; if you think otherwise then you clearly don't understand the mechanics of addiction.
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TSRreader
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#27
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#27
Do you mean that it is not enough to stop the addiction or to convince him take some actions to stop?
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thats_my_poison
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#28
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#28
bloody hell, i know him!!! he was such a lovely guy as well. think he was doing economics or something mathsy - i remember he had tons of stats stuff all over his room. such a shame..
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DannyBoy123
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#29
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#29
(Original post by TSRreader)
Do you mean that it is not enough to stop the addiction or to convince him take some actions to stop?
No, what I am saying is that addiction is a complex psychological problem that is nearly impossible for an 'outsider' to understand. Stating simply that because he hated it he must therefore have been immature because he didn't take actions to stop it is naive; I suggest you read Antony Kiedis' (lead singer of the chili's) auto-biography - it is not only a damn good read, it explains in some detail what addiction is like.
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Pedsdude
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#30
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#30
Turns out he was doing BMS! Seems weird that someone so close could be responsible for such a thing, but then again surprises happen on a daily basis.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/3003510.stm
Does he really need to be in "Britain's Alcatraz"?!
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MOORE_LAWSTUDENT
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#31
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#31
Stop the liberal crap. He's a criminal and deserves to serve his full sentence. I would actually argue that he should serve double time because of his intelligence, which means that the attacks were probably highly calculated.
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RM89
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#32
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#32
i know this guy. he was in my math class - never came though
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Pedsdude
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#33
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#33
(Original post by MOORE_LAWSTUDENT)
Stop the liberal crap. He's a criminal and deserves to serve his full sentence. I would actually argue that he should serve double time because of his intelligence, which means that the attacks were probably highly calculated.
I agree about him serving his full sentence, but about the double time because of his intelligence thing...

Would you rather have a low-life going into jail for 3 years and then coming out very likely to recommit, or would you rather have an LSE student going in for 3 years and the coming out less likely to recommit?

Obviously, it depends on the character of the person, but you'd expect some low-life to just go back to recommitting, whereas the intelligent person would have learned their lesson (even if it was a 1 year sentence). Double the time wouldn't make any difference. Whether or not they were highly calculated or not doesn't particularly matter, it's more about whether or not they'll recommit once they leave prison.

In fact, because of the problem of overcrowding in prisons, it's best to keep each prison inside for as long as it takes to ensure they won't recommit (I'm talking about small crime, rather than murder etc.), so 6 years would just be unneccesary.
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petite_chaperon_rose
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#34
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#34
that person needs serious rehab above all..
he's young and intelligent ..
he should get intense rehab to overcome his gambling problem while in prison...
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DannyBoy123
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#35
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#35
(Original post by MOORE_LAWSTUDENT)
Stop the liberal crap. He's a criminal and deserves to serve his full sentence. I would actually argue that he should serve double time because of his intelligence, which means that the attacks were probably highly calculated.
It's not liberal crap, to be honest I am not really a liberal person. I fully agree he deserves to serve his full sentence, my point is that the pastoral care of the LSE has to be questioned if things could get to the point where a student is robbing stores in order to feed an out of control addiction before anyone notices.

And you must be a pretty poor law student if you think the fact he is intelligent means he should serve a double sentence - the robberies probably were highly calculated but the whole notion of a robbery is that calculation is implicit in the act - otherwise you are saying that someone happened to be carrying a shotgun, a balaclava and a pair of gloves all at once and decided on the spur of the moment to rob a random store. Applying double standards on the basis of peoples intelligence is simply ludicrous to be quite frank. :rolleyes:
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MOORE_LAWSTUDENT
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#36
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#36
The distinction is fine. People with mental difficulties can get into trouble much more easily than intelligent people. I want to redress this balance. This is a general statement. The distinction is often made between crime in the suites v crime on the streets. This has nothing to do with law, it is a question of criminal justice policy. But to be clear, robbery doesn't require any extensive kind of preparation. My point is that these attacks were probably carried out with precision whereas poorer people and those looking to fund drug addictions would not have this cognitive and rational approach. I think the latter deserves greater punishment and I think many would agree with me.

And come on, I'm afraid LSE isn't a kindergarten. Grown men should be able to look after themselves. Why is there this culture of help everywhere we bloody go. Just get on with one's life.
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zxczxc
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#37
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#37
Will Mears is a complete ****. He's not a good human being. End of. All of us who knew him were constantly threatened by him and his behaviour in general, and he made it clear to all in his halls that he was in possession of a knife and that he wasn't scared to use it. I can't help but feel that the gambling thing is bull.
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MOORE_LAWSTUDENT
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#38
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#38
This is an interesting revelation. I would suggest that you make this known to the authorities. He sounds like a ruthless scumbag.
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Pedsdude
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#39
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#39
(Original post by MOORE_LAWSTUDENT)
My point is that these attacks were probably carried out with precision whereas poorer people and those looking to fund drug addictions would not have this cognitive and rational approach. I think the latter deserves greater punishment and I think many would agree with me.
Do you mean former? (considering what you said in the previous posts)

So what if they were carried out "with precision"? It's exactly the same crime and he's probably a better person in general than the poorer person who's looking to fund a drug addiction. Once the drug addict comes out of jail, he'll probably just continue back where he left off, so surely he should have a greater punishment?

Anyway, even if many agree with you, the law doesn't, so you're wrong. Deal with it.
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TSRreader
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#40
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#40
Special circumstances can be used to reduce sentences but I never heard of extending them though.

And in regard to LSE student being better that the poorer person, there's surely no evident to point to it. The poorer person is pushed to a more desperate situation than the LSE student therefore the poor person got less to lose and comparatively more to gain. Yet, both would commit similar act of crime but with respective disproportional amount of sacrifice. So from only using the currently available information, the estimate about the LSE student being better than the poorer person is not at all plausible but more likely to be worse.

(To be clear, I am not proposing extra sentence but just pointing out how disappointingly this LSE student had acted)
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