everyone seems to feel the need to declare to the world they're from a state comp Watch

afua12
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#21
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(Original post by 0129Hippy)
No, of course not every sinle one of them are. But then again, it would be extremely unusual if a private or a grammar school offered the all too common drawbacks of state education i have mentioned. Well...well done for being so lucky with your school but it is just that-luck. I know,nt just my own, but several schools where 1 or 2 clubs are offered to a school of over 2000 children. Can you see this happening at a grammar/priv??
Whats more-it is extremely daunting to attend an open day for say Warwick, Cambridge etc alone cos your parents don't care and your friends don't have enough for the train fare. Only to find that slot of others are with parents, taking notes, and giving encouragement. Of course you're gonna use the fact you're not part of this upbringing to your advantage. The school you went to being-broad generalisation as it is-an indicator of this.
of course, I'm not argueing that. If this is your situation, then definitely I was the best of luck to them. And I mentioned that in my original post - there are a lot of people who do actually have the right (imo) to a bit of leniency, or at the least, understanding.

What I'm saying though, is that if this isn't the case, the fact your school is a comp should not automatically equate to that.
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pcok
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(Original post by afua12)
It comes up on here a lot, with people making a point to make sure everyone knows they're at a comp. At also at uni open days I've noticed it quite a bit. I was at Cambridge yesterday, and one of the first things I heard from someone, was a very loud conversation about how "someone like me from a state comp could end up in a place like this." It sounded like he was trying to make out he was really common or something by the way he said it...And then over the day I kept overhearing loads of people saying along the lines of "someone from a school like mine." It wasn't just Cambridge though, (which I could probably understand), it was most places.

It seems almost as though people are fishing for some sort of sympathy or something? Be nice, I'm a mere comp student from the ghetto - it's been a difficult struggle. It really annoys me, because there are lots of people who have actually had to work hard to get into higher education because of factors outside of their control. It almost makes a mokery of them.

I don't know what people are trying to do, as most of them are very good sudents anyway. When you're asking for a bit of leniency on your terrible grades of 7A*s at gcse and 3As at As, it's soudns like a bit of a joke to me. Of course it may have been slightly more difficult for you to have gotten these grades from your school rather than at a grammar where the sole purpose is spititng out grades, but if you're as intelligent as your grades suggest, you'd put in the extra effort yourself.

Just something I wanted a little rant about, and I would really like to hear from people who do it - there might actually be a good reason which I've completely missed.
It's just for me, my school is good, and don't see the point in pretending it's terrible, when it's really not.
I don't go around saying it, but I can see why people do. It's not for a sympathy vote, but take for example the person you said about in Cambridge. He was probably amazed that he was at such a place; I know I was. Yeah I didn't go around saying it, but I thought it. I don't know anyone else that's ever applied there, and I was the only one in my college to, so it's quite a big deal compared to those who have been spoon fed in private schools.

Yeah of course there are some very intelligent people in private/grammar schools, however a hell of a lot of people in these schools would not have done any where near as well in a crappy state school. At my high school 16% of my year were predicted 5A*-C...we didn't even achieve this percentage. In my college I was the only person to take four AS (and A2) Levels. I am one of three people predicted AAA or more. Can you not see that it's harder for people from this sort of background to do as well as those from more privilidged backgrounds? Oxbridge is far more of a dream for these people than for private school students. Infact not even a dream; for most people it does not even occur to them.
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Brighten
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If you go to a private school, you're more likely to think you're in with a shot at Oxbridge than someone who has spent their life in some **** school where hardly anyone goes to any university. I know that I thought that Oxbridge was a place solely for the very best of privileged geniuses, and my school is quite good. It's more of a shock to them to actually be there if they've never even considered they had a chance of being accepted. To many people the place has a sort of mysticism about it.
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Fiasco
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Unless you've been to a state school you wont actually believe some of the incompetence we have to put up with everyday. Some teachers give less of a **** about our education than some students about their own. In an environment like that I think people have a right to declare they came from a comp school. Why else do you think universities like Oxford and Cambridge take these things into account? Ask yourself why so many grammar school kids try and distance them self from public school kids?

I don't think any one should go around shouting it from the rooftops, but I think it's right Universities take these things into consideration. Most students at comp schools sitting their GCSE's have no idea about A levels let alone Uni's. I would also go as far as saying getting into a grammar school almost certainly guarantees you better GCSE results, A level results & Uni places.
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Robob
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(Original post by pcok)
I don't go around saying it, but I can see why people do. It's not for a sympathy vote, but take for example the person you said about in Cambridge. He was probably amazed that he was at such a place; I know I was. Yeah I didn't go around saying it, but I thought it. I don't know anyone else that's ever applied there, and I was the only one in my college to, so it's quite a big deal compared to those who have been spoon fed in private schools.
If you've been spoon fed, you'd be very unlikely to get in.
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Philosoraptor
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(Original post by Fiasco)
Unless you've been to a state school you wont actually believe some of the incompetence we have to put up with everyday. Some teachers give less of a **** about our education than some students about their own.
Precisely!


Good man.

In addition, there's no harm about being proud of an achievement.
Fair enough, if they constantly whine on about it - anyone would get annoyed!
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HCD
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(Original post by Fiasco)
Unless you've been to a state school you wont actually believe some of the incompetence we have to put up with everyday. Some teachers give less of a **** about our education than some students about their own. In an environment like that I think people have a right to declare they came from a comp school. Why else do you think universities like Oxford and Cambridge take these things into account? Ask yourself why so many grammar school kids try and distance them self from public school kids?

I don't think any one should go around shouting it from the rooftops, but I think it's right Universities take these things into consideration. Most students at comp schools sitting their GCSE's have no idea about A levels let alone Uni's. I would also go as far as saying getting into a grammar school almost certainly guarantees you better GCSE results, A level results & Uni places.
Could you please explain what you mean with the first part I bolded? I don't really see how it follows, or what you mean. :confused:

Also, of course Grammar School students will have better results and better universities on average - as they're selective schools. You have to be intelligent to get into Grammar school (though you wouldn't know it sometimes), and intelligent people will, on average, do better in GCSEs, A levels, and at University, than less intelligent people.
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Zii
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I'm from a state school and I often feel the need to shout this from the rooftops.
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annarchy
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#29
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Oh... Hey me too! I go to a community college in some forgotten inner city borough, and have had to experience the way in which the teachers usually don't give a crap about whether you show up let alone whether you're doing ok in the subject.

I went to a private school before that and the teachers actually care to some extent. There is a difference in most state schools, in this sense.

Other than in this thread, I don't feel the need to declare it and I really don't care if people do.
Chillax and let people do what they want. Jesus christ.
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missygeorgia
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#30
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I'm from a private school/college and I think it's obviously the case that people from state schools have to work harder and should get credit for that. However when people say stuff like

(Original post by sammo1)
You probably aint got a clue what a state school is like compared to some private one.

People from private schools usually have their head stuck up their ass all the time, so people from normal state schools have to try to use it as an advantage as you already
;this is what makes my blood boil. I get so angry when I hear people being judemental in this way.
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InnocentEyes
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(Original post by missygeorgia)
;this is what makes my blood boil. I get so angry when I hear people being judemental in this way.
:dito:

I fully appreciate the priviledge I had in being privately educated, but it makes me furious when we are all judged and tarred with the same brush as 'arrogant' and 'spoon fed'. Personally, I don't come from a family in which priviledge is the norm, infact my parents were educated in 'state comps' themselves and probably had to deal with a heck of a lot more prejudice and adverse circumstances to get where they are today than anyone our age will. There's no call to make generalisations about the attitudes and capabilities of those educated in the private system, or indeed in grammar schools. In the end, on TSR there'll always be some kind of academic pissing contest but adding the type of education you had into the equation just proves that your own abilities can't stand alone imho.
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Guy Secretan
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(Original post by 0129Hippy)
Well, tbh, unless you've actually spent your whole life in the state system, and don't forget the usual traits which go along with it....ie, teachers who are constantly off, lack of extra cirricular opportunities, a culture of laziness and apathy towards learning, not to mention the lack of textbooks etc etc...well i think you'd feel a tad differently. I imagine these people have worked dramatically hard to be in the position where they can consider unis like Oxford. And yeah, getting a glimpse at it can understandably make them want to be a part of it. So much so, that through their anxiety of possibly not getting a place...they feel resentful at the fact that they may well be more capable than other public schooled kids but have been through an uphill struggle all the way.
:dito:
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afua12
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of course the people who went/ are at bad states schools are going to need that to be recognised, but I'm asking more about the fact that it seems everyone from any comp feels the need to use it. Not all comprehensives are failing, with terrible teachers.

like, I know some people at my school/ the local schools (which are all comps, but imo v. good) and they're always banging on about how much bad luck they've had going to such terrible schools and how they'll never get in to anywhere. I wanted to ask about people like this. For a lot of people at state schools, it hasn't been an uphill struggle, and so pulling out the state school card almost makes a joke out of the (hopefully) lenience/understanding people who did have to work hard get.
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Fiasco
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(Original post by HCD)
Could you please explain what you mean with the first part I bolded? I don't really see how it follows, or what you mean. :confused:
I was trying to make the point that grammar school kids always seem to make the point that they're state educated, and didn't pay for their grades. They make it out to be a struggle to get into Oxbridge between state and independent schools, when in reality grammar schools do have marginally better results than independent schools (I do have facts to back this up).

Basically, grammar schools kids aren't innocent when it comes to things like this.

Happy? :p:
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River85
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(Original post by 0129Hippy)
Well, tbh, unless you've actually spent your whole life in the state system, and don't forget the usual traits which go along with it....ie, teachers who are constantly off, lack of extra cirricular opportunities, a culture of laziness and apathy towards learning, not to mention the lack of textbooks etc etc...well i think you'd feel a tad differently. I imagine these people have worked dramatically hard to be in the position where they can consider unis like Oxford. And yeah, getting a glimpse at it can understandably make them want to be a part of it. So much so, that through their anxiety of possibly not getting a place...they feel resentful at the fact that they may well be more capable than other public schooled kids but have been through an uphill struggle all the way.
Oh come! There's a wide variation in quality and, yes, there are some really crap schools. However, what you have highlighted isn't typical amongst state schools. There are so darn good state schools out there (especially faith schools) that can offer good facilities, extra-curricular activities and enough textbooks.

I appreciate that you know not all state schools are like this but I don't even think the majority are. Far from it. You give the impression that they are.
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Vraicanon
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I went to a state school and college. Yeah, it was pretty bad at times but I still received a good education. Granted, it may not be as 'amazing' as a private education but going to a state school also means I don't have my head in the clouds. I have worked damn hard for my qualifications and it angers me when privately educated students look down on me and my qualifications. Obviously not good enough for them... But not everyones mummy and daddy can pay thousands of pounds a year for their children to go to school. :\ It annoys me more when people feel the need to brag they've had a private education. Ergh. You're no better than me.
Even though I am from a socially and economically deprived area, I don't play that card in public, it makes me prouder that I'm going to University and moving away etc to 'make something of myself.' Those who have been privately educated perhaps don't have all these worries because they know they're going to have the 'best' provided for them at all times!
Saying that, I wouldn't want to go to Oxford anyway. I just get the feeling that Universities like that don't care about the students wants/needs, they just care about the grades at the end of it all so they can stay at the top of the league tables...
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linkdapink
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I'd never ***** about coming from a state school. I've actually gone to two pretty bad primary schools. The first one didn't pick up on two of my friends dyslexia, and my sister's pretty bad learning difficulties. The second one was more focussed on music and the arts than actually learning. Granted, I did well at both schools, but I was one of those "clever kids"

And as for my secondary school, yeah it was a comp, and bloody hell, York has more private schools than comps, I'm sure. But it was pretty much the best in the North East (of comps obviously) so I can't really complain. I did pretty well, and had loads of opportunities and did loads of different things and had a lot of fun. Our school was in a "debate" at York uni with private schools in the area, about private schools. Classic moment when the head of the debate team shouted "bad people go to bad schools" - maybe you have to know the guy.
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LieDown
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I was in big private school for years, moved to the local school around GCSE (i.e. state comp) and was fine, got into five unis, worked hard etc, and I don't know how it affected by application but I certainly don't 'announce' it as some sort of way to modify where I got in. No-one I knew in either school thought they should get in on the merit of the 'difficulty' or 'cirucmstance' of their schooling.

It does annoy me however that many state school kids think that private school students get an easy ride into universities. Or when people from private schools assume state school kids are given too much merit because of their 'uphill struggle'.
There's problems for and from both sides, so *shrug* just a part of school/application to uni.
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tomster
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(Original post by 0129Hippy)
Well, tbh, unless you've actually spent your whole life in the state system, and don't forget the usual traits which go along with it....ie, teachers who are constantly off, lack of extra cirricular opportunities, a culture of laziness and apathy towards learning, not to mention the lack of textbooks etc etc...well i think you'd feel a tad differently. I imagine these people have worked dramatically hard to be in the position where they can consider unis like Oxford. And yeah, getting a glimpse at it can understandably make them want to be a part of it. So much so, that through their anxiety of possibly not getting a place...they feel resentful at the fact that they may well be more capable than other public schooled kids but have been through an uphill struggle all the way.
Brilliant post, you summed up my school.

And yes OP, I go to one of the schools that has been threatened with closure unless improved. The difference is astounding between a 'good' comprehensive and a poor one.
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Fiasco
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(Original post by InnocentEyes)
:dito:

I fully appreciate the priviledge I had in being privately educated, but it makes me furious when we are all judged and tarred with the same brush as 'arrogant' and 'spoon fed'. Personally, I don't come from a family in which priviledge is the norm, infact my parents were educated in 'state comps' themselves and probably had to deal with a heck of a lot more prejudice and adverse circumstances to get where they are today than anyone our age will. There's no call to make generalisations about the attitudes and capabilities of those educated in the private system, or indeed in grammar schools. In the end, on TSR there'll always be some kind of academic pissing contest but adding the type of education you had into the equation just proves that your own abilities can't stand alone imho.
No. This isn't about smearing each other, it's about recognising that going to a state comprehensive and getting very good grades is harder than going to a grammar/private. It doesn't detract from your achievements just because you went to a private school. Conversely, it bolsters a comp students application so that they can compete on a level playing field.

I put it to you - prove to me that getting into a private/grammar doesn't improve your chances significantly of achieving better grades (ignoring extreme examples)? You can't, because it does. Then shouldn't all students from state comp's be allowed a level playing field? Please don't make it out to appear that comp school kids are at an unfair advantage or that private/grammar school kids are at a disadvantage.
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