Physics? Watch

crazyhelicopter
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#21
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#21
(Original post by jjkkll)
I reccomend physics, its enjoyable and although no medical schools SPECIFICLY Say they want physcics but when deciding between two equal canfdidates:

AAA in Biology, Chmistry and Physics and AAA in Biology Chemistry and RS. Providing that PS and interviews are similar they will prefer the candidate with physics
This is complete *******s!!!!!!! Leave now you obviously know nothing and have done no research!

OP- pick the one you're going to do best in/ enjoy the most. The majority of universities want chemistry (some biology as well). They also like to see a breath of study etc.
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royale_sufi
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#22
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Yep you should do the one you most enjoy doing. Besides, Physics is going to be a LOT harder than RS... i guarantee that. So if you want an easier ride pick RS. But if you want a more respected subject for uni, then pick physics!

Good luck, Picking what you most enjoy is of the uthmost importance.
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scaryhair
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#23
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#23
(Original post by NS)
What the hell would you use a Religious Studies A Level for? It's hardly going to open up a wide range of options if you ask me... and the OP has already decided what career they are going for anyway. :p:
Personally, I don't see it as an extrememly useful A level either. But taking Physics would probably restrict him to the sciences, whereas RS would show he can reflect and relate to other peole and views, rather than just learning and understanding facts.
Most unis for medicine prefer breadth of study at A2 level, so RS would in most cases be the better option.
Just because the OP has decided on Medicine, it doesn't mean he'll end up going into it. A lot of applicants don't get places, or he may end up changing his mind before then. So it actually is quite relevant that he keep his options open.
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BillV3
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#24
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#24
I'd ask your college about what they choose for PHY3 if they choose Medical Physics it could be quite advantageous, my college picked Astrophysics oh so dull =[
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NS
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#25
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#25
(Original post by scaryhair)
Personally, I don't see it as an extrememly useful A level either. But taking Physics would probably restrict him to the sciences, whereas RS would show he can reflect and relate to other peole and views, rather than just learning and understanding facts.
Most unis for medicine prefer breadth of study at A2 level, so RS would in most cases be the better option.
Just because the OP has decided on Medicine, it doesn't mean he'll end up going into it. A lot of applicants don't get places, or he may end up changing his mind before then. So it actually is quite relevant that he keep his options open.
As far as I'm aware only UCL explicitly ask for breadth of study. Also, I'm answering on which is best for medicine as was asked. IMO, Physics is much better than RS for someone going into the medical profession. The requirements for medical school are science A Levels.
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scaryhair
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#26
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#26
(Original post by NS)
As far as I'm aware only UCL explicitly ask for breadth of study. Also, I'm answering on which is best for medicine as was asked. IMO, Physics is much better than RS for someone going into the medical profession. The requirements for medical school are science A Levels...
No, the requirements for Medicine are Chemistry to A level, and largely Biology to A level - only require TWO sciences are required mostly. Taking all three major sciences would not prove breadth of interest and academic study, and could actually hinder the OP's application rather than help it.
Ultimately, medicine is an applied science with a major part of it demanding excellent personal skills and the ability to empathise and understand how people are feeling. RS will demonstrate this a whole lot better than Physics. The only field that I would recommend Physics for was if the OP wanted to go into academic medicine.
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NS
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#27
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(Original post by scaryhair)
No, the requirements for Medicine are Chemistry to A level, and largely Biology to A level - only require TWO sciences are required mostly.
Yes, the requirements are Chemistry and another science A Level; not Chemistry and a humanities subject.

(Original post by scaryhair)
Taking all three major sciences would not prove breadth of interest and academic study,
I didn't say taking all 3 sciences would prove breadth of interest.
I didn't say taking all 3 sciences would prove breadth of academic study.

(Original post by scaryhair)
and could actually hinder the OP's application rather than help it.
It most certainly would not hinder their application; that's just not true. Perhaps if they were applying to UCL, but otherwise this is false.

(Original post by scaryhair)
Ultimately, medicine is an applied science with a major part of it demanding excellent personal skills and the ability to empathise and understand how people are feeling.
Thank you for telling me what medicine is, I really needed that clarifying.

(Original post by scaryhair)
RS will demonstrate this a whole lot better than Physics. The only field that I would recommend Physics for was if the OP wanted to go into academic medicine.
Right, so Physics will benefit them if interested in academic medicine. What field do you suggest they go into with RS then?
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scaryhair
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#28
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#28
(Original post by NS)
Yes, the requirements are Chemistry and another science A Level; not Chemistry and a humanities subject.

I didn't say taking all 3 sciences would prove breadth of interest.
I didn't say taking all 3 sciences would prove breadth of academic study.

It most certainly would not hinder their application; that's just not true. Perhaps if they were applying to UCL, but otherwise this is false.

Thank you for telling me what medicine is, I really needed that clarifying.

Right, so Physics will benefit them if interested in academic medicine. What field do you suggest they go into with RS then?

I give up with you. The OP is already doing two sciences, Chemistry and Biology, which are incidentally the ones most required by other unis. Therefore he does not have to do another, especially if the subjects he is already taking are going to help him with the non academic side of medicine.
Although UCL is the only uni that specifically states in their prospectus that they prefer breadth, a lot of others do - they have stated so at Open Days.
If you think medicine is solely science, you really have some rethinking to do.
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Beska
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#29
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#29
Chemistry + Biology + Physics is fine.

Chemistry + Biology + RS is equally fine.

You will not be be at any advantage doing one over another.

You will not be at any disadvantage doing one over another.
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Jinxy
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#30
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#30
(Original post by Harribot)
So far my A-level choices are biology, chemistry, psychology and r.s.

Im wondering if it would give me more options of medical schools and a higher chance of getting into medicine with a physics as level instead of of religious studies one.

I enjoy both in equal amounts but they are so different.

What would be better for medicine?
Physics because I believe some schools want 2 sciences plus another, I think it's Keele that want chem, bio and maths or physics and then a fourth subject. I'd advise you to look at the req's of the unis you think you are interested in.
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NS
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#31
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#31
(Original post by scaryhair)
I give up with you. The OP is already doing two sciences, Chemistry and Biology, which are incidentally the ones most required by other unis. Therefore he does not have to do another, especially if the subjects he is already taking are going to help him with the non academic side of medicine.
Although UCL is the only uni that specifically states in their prospectus that they prefer breadth, a lot of others do - they have stated so at Open Days.
If you think medicine is solely science, you really have some rethinking to do.
Just because he is already going to be doing 2 sciences isn't a reason to not do any more; it makes no difference to whether he should do Physics or RS - so stop focusing on that. Also, I didn't say he had to do another science. "A lot of other" universities do not require breadth. Open days are not secret meetings where they tell you important things like the requirement of a breadth of A Level subjects, that they hide from those not at them. You must be pretty worn out after all those open days. ;yes;
What I think medicine is has no bearing on whether the OP should pick Physics or RS. You are bringing many things into the argument that just have no bearing on it.
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Jinxy
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#32
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#32
(Original post by NS)
Just because he is already going to be doing 2 sciences isn't a reason to not do any more; it makes no difference to whether he should do Physics or RS - so stop focusing on that. Also, I didn't say he had to do another science. "A lot of other" universities do not require breadth. Open days are not secret meetings where they tell you important things like the requirement of a breadth of A Level subjects, that they hide from those not at them. You must be pretty worn out after all those open days. ;yes;
What I think medicine is has no bearing on whether the OP should pick Physics or RS. You are bringing many things into the argument that just have no bearing on it.
I agree.

I honestly think that when it comes to medicine, do what your best in and make sure you take bio and chem to A2. Try to keep your other two subjects academic, such as a language, history, english, maths or physics if you like. I believe RS is also an academic subject too.
When it comes to medicine, it is much more about getting the grades, imagine if you miss it because you took a harder subject to look better but didn't even get in. Like a few people say, take a subject you enjoy more because you will be compelled to work harder as you prefer it. Most universities have no preference over the third and fourth as long as they are not like PE, Maths & further or Art.

I think that rather than worrying about which to take, worry more about the relevant work experience you will need to be getting and how you can bring variation into your application in other ways, other than by which subjects your taking because at the end of the day anyone can take those subjects but not everyone can have the same talents and do the same voluntary and work experience.
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m4n0ran
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#33
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#33
Meh, so I'm doing Physics+Chem+Bio+Maths and this will put me at a disadvantage? Don't agree with whoever said that. Not exactly fair to demand Chem+Bio and then say you can do this, this and that except Physics. The subjects and the grades are just the minimum requirements, it's your UCKAT/BMAT scores, reference, personal statement and work experience that set you apart.
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Suspect
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#34
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#34
I think that especially as the OP is only planning on taking this 4th subject to AS, it wont matter too much which it is.

Choose the one you will do best in- also look at which unis you are thinking of applying to- to see if they do have a specific preference of more science or more breadth.

I think RS does have some advantages that havent been mentioned here though- you often do modules on medical ethics and getting used to considering and weighing up different points of view could come in useful in some interviews (eg Manchesters 5 min ethical debate at the end). But Physics obviously has advantages too- if you will do equally well in both, then just choose the one you will enjoy more.
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NS
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#35
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#35
(Original post by m4n0ran)
Meh, so I'm doing Physics+Chem+Bio+Maths and this will put me at a disadvantage? Don't agree with whoever said that. Not exactly fair to demand Chem+Bio and then say you can do this, this and that except Physics.
Exactly what I was saying.
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crazyhelicopter
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#36
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Right to all of you...

Taking physics will NOT put you at any advantage, it may not disadvantage you're application but nor will it help it. In the same way as maths puts you at no advantage.

The MAJORITY of UK medical schools specifically say that they prefer a diversity of subjects (this may be with the exception of Oxbridge- not sure)

The Universities are far more interested in work experience, PS, predicted grades than the subjects that you're taking. As long as you can justify you're choices you'll b fine.

And for the idiot who thinks physics will be useful to the medical course- I didn't do physics at AS, A-level or GCSE (did dual award), I'm now in my 4th year at medical school and can say that at no point would I ever have been at an advantage by taking physics, however if RS would be useful for ethics, and better understanding the religious influences of patient's decisions
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crazylemon
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#37
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For most unis it does not matter they dont care I know UCL prefer a breath of study so if you want to go there RS would be better. As for the other only some colleges in Cambridge require 3 science A levels. (Perosnally i whish i had done history intsead of physics as I want to go to UCL but this is just me)
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NS
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#38
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#38
(Original post by crazyhelicopter)
Right to all of you...

Taking physics will NOT put you at any advantage, it may not disadvantage you're application but nor will it help it. In the same way as maths puts you at no advantage.

The MAJORITY of UK medical schools specifically say that they prefer a diversity of subjects (this may be with the exception of Oxbridge- not sure)

The Universities are far more interested in work experience, PS, predicted grades than the subjects that you're taking. As long as you can justify you're choices you'll b fine.

And for the idiot who thinks physics will be useful to the medical course- I didn't do physics at AS, A-level or GCSE (did dual award), I'm now in my 4th year at medical school and can say that at no point would I ever have been at an advantage by taking physics, however if RS would be useful for ethics, and better understanding the religious influences of patient's decisions
People are entitled to their opinions. I can see the benefits of both, but I personally feel that Physics is more helpful to a medical school applicant than Religious Studies. At the end of the day, what I was getting at is there is a reason why medical schools want at least 2 science A Levels - which includes Bio, Chem, Phy or Maths. This does not include Religious Studies. So in my opinion, Physics is better than Religious Studies for Medicine. Also, it is well known that Physics helps in Physiology work. For example, you need to have a good head for numbers. The gas laws are very important for ventilation, and the ability to understand resultant forces/tensions will also help greatly for cardiovascular physiology/ventilation.

Calling people idiots is unnecessary. ;yes;
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psyche87
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#39
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#39
(Original post by crazyhelicopter)
And for the idiot who thinks physics will be useful to the medical course- I didn't do physics at AS, A-level or GCSE (did dual award), I'm now in my 4th year at medical school and can say that at no point would I ever have been at an advantage by taking physics, however if RS would be useful for ethics, and better understanding the religious influences of patient's decisions
I think I just got called an idiot...

I think everyone's entitled to their own opinion.

And in my opinion, A level Physics has been useful to me in the medical course (I just finished my second year).

- I'm very confident with numbers, data, graphs (which would probably have been the case anyway, but A level Physics meant that I had lots of practice with equations/etc). And this confidence has been great in doing things like drawing Lineweaver-Burke plots, playing around with equations to get what I need out of the equations (such as all the Drug/Receptor interaction stuff), etc.

- Ideal gases and things like PV=nRT made my life so much easier when learning about parts of respiration. It apparently also comes in handy if you want to do anaesthesia in the future.

- Capacitance, current, etc helped me with those models of a nerve that they draw using electric circuits (with resistance, capacitance, etc), and were definitely helpful in trying to figure out bits of the time/space constants of nerves!

- Waves were also a great help to me with some of the visual/auditory bits of Neuro... and I managed to do some Neurophysiology questions with just my A level Physics knowledge...

- More specifically, I did the fluids option at A levels, which included things like flow of fluids through tubes, turbulent flow, etc - which was directly relevant to what I learnt in flow of blood through blood vessels. Things like Reynold's number, ideal/non-ideal fluids and how blood is a non-ideal fluid, etc.

Physics is definitely not essential, and you can certainly figure out what's going on without Physics... But A level Physics HAS helped me to figure out things far faster than I otherwise would have, and that's why I've found it useful in my medical course.
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crazyhelicopter
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#40
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(Original post by NS)
People are entitled to their opinions. I can see the benefits of both, but I personally feel that Physics is more helpful to a medical school applicant than Religious Studies. At the end of the day, what I was getting at is there is a reason why medical schools want at least 2 science A Levels - which includes Bio, Chem, Phy or Maths. This does not include Religious Studies. So in my opinion, Physics is better than Religious Studies for Medicine. Also, it is well known that Physics helps in Physiology work. For example, you need to have a good head for numbers. The gas laws are very important for ventilation, and the ability to understand resultant forces/tensions will also help greatly for cardiovascular physiology/ventilation.

Calling people idiots is unnecessary. ;yes;
Unless I'm very wrong you aren't actually currently a medical student. Do you know anything about the course? Have you attended lectures? Have you passed any exams?

I have, and as a result I feel that I am slightly more qualified to discuss the benefits of certain subjects.

As I said, it doesn't matter if you do physics or RS (particularly as a 4th AS). Yes you need 2 sciences but the OP is taking Biology and Chemistry, a third science will be of no benefit for application and of little benefit during the course itself
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