Why CAN'T you apply to both Oxford and Cambridge? Watch

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generalebriety
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#21
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#21
(Original post by Gren1TI)
Another problem would exist if people could apply to both; as excellent applicants would be accepted by both universities and then the student would have to let one down and disappoint them.

I’m sure that’s neither Oxford nor Cambridge are used to! :p:
True; but a fair few people do turn down Oxford or Cambridge each year.
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Y__
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#22
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(Original post by English lit geek)
I would like to the answer to this question as well! i was wanting to apply to both so i'd have a better chance of getting into a top uni but no one seems to know??
This is pretty obviously not true. Cambridge and Oxford combined have a limited number of places for your subject that doesn't magically double if you could apply to both universities. If you could apply to both, everyone would, not just you, so you're not at all more likely to get into either one.
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Sk1lLz
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#23
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#23
(Original post by princess_sue)
why there is a rule I'm unsure of but I do know that its only for your first undergraduate degree, so if you decide to study more then you can apply to both. Maybe its some old gentlemen's rule or something.

If i find out, ill post again
Interesting if you can apply to both if you are planning on even further education... adds a twist.
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dealbreaker
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#24
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Because the best candidates would obtain offers from both... Imagine also how Cambridge would justify rejecting a candidate when he or she has been offered a place by Oxford...
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-WhySoSerious?
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#25
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#25
Simply because it is extremely difficult to get offers from one?

And also, they tend to give out lower offers overall. If they know that people are going to go elsewhere, they will need to rethink their strategy on admissions
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RightSaidJames
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#26
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#26
Also, it would throw their number of allocated places out of whack completely. They'd have no way of knowing if you'd applied to the other Oxbridge uni as well as them, so they'd either not give out enough places and end up with not enough people on the course, or give out way too many places and have more students than they have rooms in the college/places on the course, depending on how the course at one of the unis ranked against the other.
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shootbangfire
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#27
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#27
They'd have to interview up to twice the number of applicants, and they wouldn't know how many places to allocate if people were going to then reject their offer for "the other place".
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Rei
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#28
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#28
Everybody would apply to both I guess.
hobnob
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#29
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(Original post by Sk1lLz)
Interesting if you can apply to both if you are planning on even further education... adds a twist.
Why does it "add a twist"?
You can apply to both if you're applying to do a second BA because there aren't very many people who choose that route (just as there aren't very many potential organ scholars). There aren't very many people applying for second BAs because there are no student loans to cover for them - which also means you have to pay several thousand pounds in college fees on top of tuition fees, which have recently increased quite a bit because government funding has been withdrawn from them.
You can apply to both for postgraduate degrees because the admissions process is different. That's it.
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Creative
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#30
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If it were possible to apply to both, the universe would instanteously implode... we wouldn't want that..... would we now? :p:
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RocketTown
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#31
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#31
(Original post by Creative)
If it were possible to apply to both, the universe would instanteously implode... we wouldn't want that..... would we now? :p:
like when you try to divide by zero?
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Crystaltears
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#32
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#32
Probably because for the majority of candidates either both universities will accept them or both reject them and if they are accepted by both they will have to decline one anyway, so to save time and money, they may aswell only allow you to apply to one.
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Fillette
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#33
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#33
(Original post by generalebriety)

Why would you have a better chance? You're almost certain to be either accepted by both or rejected by both. Why one think you're good enough but not the other I can't imagine.

I think this is generally true if you a apply for the same course at either university, but obviously if you're applying for a different course (which you have more potential for) then either might accept you. My friend was rejected for English at Oxford and got into Cambridge for Maths because that's where her passion (and ability) lies. Thankfully it's not a personality contest..
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generalebriety
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#34
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(Original post by Fillette)
I think this is generally true if you a apply for the same course at either university, but obviously if you're applying for a different course (which you have more potential for) then either might accept you. My friend was rejected for English at Oxford and got into Cambridge for Maths because that's where her passion (and ability) lies. Thankfully it's not a personality contest..
Yep, but of course on UCAS you can't really apply for different courses very effectively.
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evissa
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#35
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#35
(Original post by hec)
because of the pride of those two universities. you can have an apple or a banana, but if you want a fruit salad you're insulting those 2 fruits.. they are very proud apples and bananas

GENIUS! PURE GENIUS I TELL YOU!
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River85
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#36
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#36
(Original post by dealbreaker)
Because the best candidates would obtain offers from both... Imagine also how Cambridge would justify rejecting a candidate when he or she has been offered a place by Oxford...
They wouldn't need to justify themselves. Universities are well within their rights to reject applicants. That's not really any different to one of the other elite unis rejecting an applicant, only for that applicant to get an offer from Oxford/Cambridge. The uni that rejected them isn't expected to justify the decision (instead they just got the unfair and unjustified reputation of being biased against potential Oxbridge grads).
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FizFazFoz
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#37
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#37
(Original post by generalebriety)
Why would you have a better chance? You're almost certain to be either accepted by both or rejected by both. Why one think you're good enough but not the other I can't imagine.
I think the candidate would stand a slightly better chance. A lot comes down to luck on the interview day-the professor who interviews you/the questions that come up etc. E.g some get rejected one year then reapply the next year to the other one and get in. i.e the system isn't infallible.

There are also subtle differences in courses e.g Economics at Cambridge vs. Economics & Management or PPE at Oxford.

However, on the whole, yes it wouldn't make a large difference and would be pointless extra work/time/money for both universities.
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Goldenratio
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#38
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For postgrad you can apply to as many unis and courses as your resources will let you :P
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generalebriety
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#39
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(Original post by FizFazFoz)
I think the candidate would stand a slightly better chance. A lot comes down to luck on the interview day-the professor who interviews you/the questions that come up etc. E.g some get rejected one year then reapply the next year to the other one and get in. i.e the system isn't infallible.
The system isn't infallible, but if you're judged unsuitable at Cambridge, it probably means that if you go to Oxford, you'll still be unsuitable. I think they err on the side of caution.

(Original post by FizFazFoz)
There are also subtle differences in courses e.g Economics at Cambridge vs. Economics & Management or PPE at Oxford.
That's hardly subtle; you couldn't write an economics personal statement that would allow you to apply for PPE, and you couldn't write a PPE statement that told the admissions tutors enough about economics to let you apply for that.
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W0bble
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#40
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#40
You the average student' CAN'T physically have a better chance - there are still the same number of places!

Of course, some people might find it easier, but to balance this some people would find it harder.
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