David Milliband's Education (Vis-à-vis Oxford) Watch

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faber niger
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#21
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#21
(Original post by River85)
Why are most of you blindingly accepting what wikipedia says. Is it referenced? If not it's could quite easily be crap. Even if it is it still may not be true.
Here's the reference: http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/programme...st/3158091.stm

An interview with Mr. Milliband himself on the BBC News website: that sounds rather reputable to me.
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River85
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#22
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Actually three Bs isn't all that bad (it's what I got!). When I was appying to uni there were still a couple of courses at Cambridge where the typical offer was ABB. Philosophy was AAB. So, yes, grade inflation plus possibly mitigating circumstnaces. Also this was a generation ago, completely different admissions tutors (who may weight some factors more than others).
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TheOneWho
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(Original post by jismith1989)
I know, but grade inflation can't be that much of a factor, can it? Also, Oxford is supposed to accept people with the best grades -- Ds and Bs don't sound like they could be termed the best.
Not necessarily. They can accept whoever they want.
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faber niger
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Personally, I'm all for giving other factors (such, as, erm, potential) more weight than past examination results. But in this über-competitive world of ours, my opinion is, I think, somewhat in the minority. Mr. Milliband obviously shows that one can do very well after no doing so well anyway (as many people often argue isn't the case) -- as I think we can all conclude, grade inflation or not, that a D and 3 Bs is not equivalent to an Oxford first.
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apotoftea
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(Original post by jismith1989)
I was reading up on the man on Wikipedia, as one does, and found that it said he gained a D and 3 Bs at A-Level, yet he was accepted at Corpus Christi college, Oxford to study PPE. How in the hell does that work? I applied, and didn't even get an interview with better grades (though I must say that I didn't get all As). Explain, someone. Here's the quote
Because entry requirements have gone up, especially if you compare the 60s/70s to the present. My aunt got into Oxford for medicine with CDD or something very similar.
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faber niger
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(Original post by TheOneWho)
Not necessarily. They can accept whoever they want.
They can. But they generally only interview people with the highest, or high, grades, and so they don't always give themselves the chance to choose candidates who may have potential but not necessarily have shown it in currently attained examination results.
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SusDev
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#27
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Also when he was applying 4 A-levels would have probably been almost unheard of.
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lolaclementine
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wasn't his dad some famous socialist philosopher? I'm sure that played in his favour
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boysenberry
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#29
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i've seen papers from the 80s in maths and french and, believe me, they are a whole different creature to the comparative drivel we get nowadays. people had to translate from english to french. i tried it. i failed.
and, the maths papers had a lot more material and the difficulty is considerably higher. (i'm talking about the scottish 'higher', roughly equivalent to AS level)

so, it isn't unreasonable to see 3 Bs and a D being good, Oxford-worthy grades, back in those days. in fact, if i had to sit those papers i would be bloody ecstatic at getting a B.
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hobnob
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#30
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Isn't he old enough to have sat the old entrance exams (in which case grades wouldn't have mattered anyway)?
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faber niger
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#31
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(Original post by hobnob)
Isn't he old enough to have sat the old entrance exams (in which case grades wouldn't have mattered anyway)?
Ah, good point. I forgot about that.
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faber niger
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#32
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(Original post by lolaclementine)
wasn't his dad some famous socialist philosopher? I'm sure that played in his favour
His dad was something to do with the Fabian society, so you're close. I don't suppose that would have anything to do with it anyway. And besides, the LSE was originally set up by the Fabian society as socialist institution and so I think he'd have had a better chance of getting into there by such means.
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Kitty Pimms
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#33
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(Original post by jismith1989)
His dad was something to do with the Fabian society, so you're close. I don't suppose that would have anything to do with it anyway. And besides, the LSE was originally set up by the Fabian society as socialist institution and so I think he'd have had a better chance of getting into there by such means.
Ralph Milliband, the socialist Professor of political science at the LSE. Famous for writing 'the State in Capitalist Society'.

As a good socialist, I'd have expected you to know that.

To be quite frank, whilst I am usually completel dismissive of nepotist admissions processes, it'd take some balls to turn down the son of such a famous politics Prof when they're looking to do PPE. Although, as hobnob said, I'm sure the entrance exam and grade inflation were the more important factor, I would imagine the tutors concerned couldn't have failed to recognise the surname.
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Hedgeman49
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#34
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My Maths teacher went to UCL with BCC, back in the 60s. I know that Milliband is slightly younger than that, but it shows how grade inflation does play a factor.
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baggiesbaggies
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The answer can be found in who his Dad was. Simple.
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anonymous1432
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This is the norm. When regarding the upper class, it's perfectly acceptable to allow a lesser gifted student a place at oxbridge, rather than a bright working class student. Money talks I'm afraid.

All the royals performed terribly at their A-Levels but still managed to be accepted into the worlds most prestigious universities. It's unfair but thats the way it is.

At least I can revel in the fact that the country is being run by people who are not fit to get into Northampton, let alone Cambridge. No wonder our country is in the loo.
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faber niger
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#37
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(Original post by timwaters2007)
This is the norm. When regarding the upper class, it's perfectly acceptable to allow a lesser gifted student a place at oxbridge, rather than a bright working class student. Money talks I'm afraid.

All the royals performed terribly at their A-Levels but still managed to be accepted into the worlds most prestigious universities. It's unfair but thats the way it is.

At least I can revel in the fact that the country is being run by people who are not fit to get into Northampton, let alone Cambridge. No wonder our country is in the loo.
He did go to a comprehensive school. But this was of course not out of necessity, but out of socialist ideology.

Though, if what you say is true (which, if it ever was, I'm not sure it is now to any great extent) when they get to Oxford, they'll have to work incredibly hard, so at least after their degree they'll be intelligent.
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RichE
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#38
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The old entrance exams were in place till 1995. Previous to that, if you took the exam and got interviewed (mode E) any offer would be EE.
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Hedgehunter
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#39
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(Original post by anna_spanner89)
hmm its wikipedia, maybe it lies??

I would say almost certainly..just some Tory joker!
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faber niger
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#40
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(Original post by IlexAquifolium)
Ralph Milliband, the socialist Professor of political science at the LSE. Famous for writing 'the State in Capitalist Society'.

As a good socialist, I'd have expected you to know that.

To be quite frank, whilst I am usually completel dismissive of nepotist admissions processes, it'd take some balls to turn down the son of such a famous politics Prof when they're looking to do PPE. Although, as hobnob said, I'm sure the entrance exam and grade inflation were the more important factor, I would imagine the tutors concerned couldn't have failed to recognise the surname.
Ah, I didn't know that: I'm going to have to look him up. Though I'm a member of the Socialist TSR society, I'm more of a liberal than socialist. I agree with Marxist analyses of society, but I don't necessarily agree with revolution or anything of that nature.

I was rather interested when I discovered that the LSE was set up by the Fabians though; especially as it's current policies are anything but socialist. And I suppose what you say about the Surname carrying weight is bound to be true.
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