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Anti-climb paint watch

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    (Original post by Zoombini)
    whats anti-climb paint? paint that stops you climbing? -how?
    It doesn't dry (well, it takes 10+ yrs) so it causes people to slip/become stained.
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    You have to have a sign up warning people when you use anti-vandle or anti-climb paint or whatever we are calling it.

    Not sure if there is anything else you can do about it all really. Climbing on walls and fences is what 10 year olds do. All the kids in my road used to climb on everything when we were 10. All part of the fun of exploring the world A man in our road used to set off his alarm system whenever we went to get footballs that went in his garden so it put us off. Used to believed he has alarmed his garden so nobody would go near it. Kids are probably smarter these days though so that probably would fail.
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    (Original post by DoktaUH)
    But what about painting the fence that does belong to the property?
    You would have to put up very obvious signs to the effect that it was covered in such.
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    (Original post by Zoombini)
    whats anti-climb paint? paint that stops you climbing? -how?
    Nope, just paint that 'sticks' to things that touch it: skins, clothes etc.

    Essentially ruins the clothes of whoever may want to go up on it.
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    (Original post by Prudy)
    Then you need permission from the owners.
    That's like saying you can't paint the walls inside without permission if you rent a house.
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    (Original post by Ed.)
    If it isn't your wall you will have trouble defending yourself legally in the event that it comes to that, if you do get permission to paint I believe you need a sign. However as others have said - you could use the paint without anybody knowing or being able to trace it back to you - but then there could be moral issues if a child seriously hurts themselves due to the paint.
    The argument (legal as opposed to moral) is that, if it is sufficiently likely that the OP was the one that painted the wall the the principle of res ipsa loquitur would require the OP then to prove he didn't do it, which puts him in a bit of shtuck.
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    (Original post by SillyFencer)
    That's like saying you can't paint the walls inside without permission if you rent a house.
    Well I was presuming a fairly standard tenancy agreement which (in my experience) doesn't allow you to paint the walls without the agreement of the owners.
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    (Original post by L i b)
    Nope, just paint that 'sticks' to things that touch it: skins, clothes etc.

    Essentially ruins the clothes of whoever may want to go up on it.
    sounds harsh
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    (Original post by Prudy)
    The argument (legal as opposed to moral) argument is that, if it is sufficiently likely that the OP was the one that painted the wall the the principle of res ipsa loquitur would require the OP then to prove he didn't do it, which puts him in a bit of shtuck.
    Oh I see, I should probably know more about law before commenting on it :o:
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    (Original post by Prudy)
    The argument (legal as opposed to moral) argument is that, if it is sufficiently likely that the OP was the one that painted the wall the the principle of res ipsa loquitur would require the OP then to prove he didn't do it, which puts him in a bit of shtuck.
    I'd probably counter it with Volenti non fit injuria
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    (Original post by DoktaUH)
    I'd probably counter it with Volenti non fit injuria
    Only if they know the risk - hence the not going out at night and painting the wall, but putting a sign up after ensuring you're allowed.
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    How would it be your fault if they fell off anyway?

    and instead of putting in measures that could cause you to be liable for clothing damage etc, speak to their parents.

    photograph them climbing, photograph the damage, then follow them home & show them to the parents.

    (don't follow them obsessively - just follow them 'on your way to a post box / shop' one day.

    then return later / another day & say 'I understand these children live here . . . they have been climbing and damaging this and that . . . . can you make them stop before they hurt themselves'.

    fairly simple tbh & the course i would take - then you cover yourself in the unlikely event they do fall off - i find the 10yr olds around my area to be quite apt at climbing lamp-posts & walls.
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    (Original post by manderton)
    photograph them climbing, photograph the damage, then follow them home & show them to the parents.
    Where i live, if i did that the parents are more likely to accuse me of being a paedophile than to reprimand their children for doing things they've been asked not to.
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    (Original post by manderton)
    How would it be your fault if they fell off anyway?
    Because it would be his painting the wall that caused them to fall off/sustain damaged clothes.
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    (Original post by Prudy)
    Because it would be his painting the wall that caused them to fall off/sustain damaged clothes.
    I was posting in the 'pre-painting-the-wall-that-doesn't-belong-to-him' stage

    hence the
    (Original post by manderton)
    instead of putting in measures that could cause you to be liable for clothing damage etc
    i had in there :cool:
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    Clothing damage rofl, that paint would be fine but the broken glass is sadly illegal thanks to our namby pamby system of so called 'criminal justice'.
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    (Original post by manderton)
    speak to their parents.
    simplest solution is often the most effective

    (Original post by manderton)
    photograph them climbing, photograph the damage, then follow them home & show them to the parents.
    i would try just talking to the parents first.... only if they deny that it's their children doing it should you take pictures... as in "proove its my kids", "ok here's a picture".
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    (Original post by Sick Puppy)
    If it's not your property to paint that could be a problem.

    Stand there in your garden with a shotgun and squirt anyone who dares enter. After a while they should get the message :yep:
    There we go.
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    Smear the top of the wall with dog **** or prehaps ofal then when they try to climb they will get a nice supprise that wont injure them.
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    (Original post by Tory Dan)
    Clothing damage rofl, that paint would be fine but the broken glass is sadly illegal thanks to our namby pamby system of so called 'criminal justice'.

    IIRC it's only illegal if it's concealed, if there was a sign or if it were visible then it would be fine. It's not as though barbed wire is illegal and trust me getting caught in that hurts, years later I still have the scars after I blundered into some illegally concealed stuff :/
 
 
 
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