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    buut this railcard everyones on about IS NOT a student card, it's available to ANYONE aged between 16 and 25. (see www.16-25railcard.co.uk ) I think the prices above refer to if you actually are a student so I'm sure that's the price you will pay.
    I buy a term student travel card to get to uni in Wolverhampton from my house in Birmingham. It costs £197 per term and I can get any bus or train in the West Midlands and use the metro so it's quite good value I think.
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    (Original post by Entities)
    **Rolls eyes** Fantastic...From what I heard on the news students were being given discount left right and center...It's all lies.
    It all depends on where you're living. Locally, more discounts are available. Nationally we students get bugger all! :p:

    Have a look on the website for your uni's local council, and see if they offer anything
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    I love going on trains.

    Oh dear. :ninja:
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    I'll get a train if i'm not going far, ie less than 50 miles. But any further it gets too expensive - i prefer national express coaches, i can get from dorset to london and back for £3 with funfares.
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    I used to get trains alot because of a LDR and from chippenham (north wiltshire) to southampton it used to cost me (with a young person railcard) anywhere between 8 and 40 pounds depending on when i bought my ticket.

    Buying tickets in advance (im talking like 2-3 weeks in advance) can give you huge discounts, so if you can do it, do.
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    I like trains, contrary to what everyone else seems to be saying on this thread they are pretty good value.

    Network away breaks are great value and are open fares so you can get on whatever train you want. The advance fares are really cheap too.

    If you are commutting they are dearer but thats your choice.
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    As long as its not before about 10am I can get a return for £2.10 to liverpool. Think its £3.60 or something if its peak time for a return, or £2 for a single ticket. Thats just for generally getting to liverpool in holidays or getting home in term time though. I didnt wanna commute for uni...
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    (Original post by emilyyy)
    Nationally we students get bugger all! :p:
    I would say that 1/3 off rail travel was really quite generous. On top of your heavily subsidised education.

    (Original post by Youngs)
    I like trains, contrary to what everyone else seems to be saying on this thread they are pretty good value.
    I have to agree, I think that the government should be making more of an effort to regulate fares (and there a number of ways this could be carried out, but they're complicated and I shan't go into them here) but in the current climate the railways offer excellent value for money.

    (Original post by sharp910sh)
    It cost me £5 everyday to get to work its like 7 miles down the road. What a con.
    You ought to be using a season ticket if you travel that regularly. It's only a con if you buy into it.

    (Original post by Entities)
    From what I heard on the news students were being given discount left right and center...It's all lies.
    Students don't pay council tax. I'd say that's a pretty generous discount.

    (Original post by emilyyy)
    And if a guard on the train questioned it, I suppose you could just feign ignorance...
    You could try. You'll find most guards will charge you the difference between your ticket and a standard at the very least, if not making you purchase a brand new ticket at full price. And ticket inspectors at stations will be even less sympathetic.

    (Original post by Entities)
    Single Return Weekly Monthly
    Adult £4.60 £7.20 £29.50 £107.00
    Student £3.10 - £19.70 - -
    It's hard to give full advice without knowing which stations you're travelling between, but you ought to consider buying a season ticket for at least 1 month, if not longer. The longer its validity, the cheaper it is. £107 for a month is good value. You only have to make 14 return journeys in the month for it to be worthwhile.

    If you've been applying to places of education, how you were going to get there should have been a consideration earlier on. I would recommend you get yourself a season ticket and try to make sure you get your money's worth. And remember, if the TOC you use fails in its obligations to its passengers in terms of punctuality and so on, you will qualify for a discount whenever you renew.
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    (Original post by nearlyheadlessian)
    I would say that 1/3 off rail travel was really quite generous. On top of your heavily subsidised education.



    I have to agree, I think that the government should be making more of an effort to regulate fares (and there a number of ways this could be carried out, but they're complicated and I shan't go into them here) but in the current climate the railways offer excellent value for money.



    You ought to be using a season ticket if you travel that regularly. It's only a con if you buy into it.




    Students don't pay council tax. I'd say that's a pretty generous discount.



    You could try. You'll find most guards will charge you the difference between your ticket and a standard at the very least, if not making you purchase a brand new ticket at full price. And ticket inspectors at stations will be even less sympathetic.



    It's hard to give full advice without knowing which stations you're travelling between, but you ought to consider buying a season ticket for at least 1 month, if not longer. The longer its validity, the cheaper it is. £107 for a month is good value. You only have to make 14 return journeys in the month for it to be worthwhile.

    If you've been applying to places of education, how you were going to get there should have been a consideration earlier on. I would recommend you get yourself a season ticket and try to make sure you get your money's worth. And remember, if the TOC you use fails in its obligations to its passengers in terms of punctuality and so on, you will qualify for a discount whenever you renew.
    I only get the train once or twice a week. So a season ticket will be more expensive.
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    (Original post by nearlyheadlessian)
    I would say that 1/3 off rail travel was really quite generous. On top of your heavily subsidised education.



    I have to agree, I think that the government should be making more of an effort to regulate fares (and there a number of ways this could be carried out, but they're complicated and I shan't go into them here) but in the current climate the railways offer excellent value for money.



    You ought to be using a season ticket if you travel that regularly. It's only a con if you buy into it.



    Students don't pay council tax. I'd say that's a pretty generous discount.



    You could try. You'll find most guards will charge you the difference between your ticket and a standard at the very least, if not making you purchase a brand new ticket at full price. And ticket inspectors at stations will be even less sympathetic.



    It's hard to give full advice without knowing which stations you're travelling between, but you ought to consider buying a season ticket for at least 1 month, if not longer. The longer its validity, the cheaper it is. £107 for a month is good value. You only have to make 14 return journeys in the month for it to be worthwhile.

    If you've been applying to places of education, how you were going to get there should have been a consideration earlier on. I would recommend you get yourself a season ticket and try to make sure you get your money's worth. And remember, if the TOC you use fails in its obligations to its passengers in terms of punctuality and so on, you will qualify for a discount whenever you renew.
    Great post, I agree with all of that.
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    I always get the train to uni. Costs £25 for a weekly ticket which is pretty reasonable. I would be wary of buying a monthly ticket just incase you do as I did and 'misplace' it after four days :rolleyes:

    I don't know about the rest of the UK but in Scotland you can apply for travel expenses and recoup a large percentage of what you've spent on train/bus tickets. They supposedly ask for evidence of each journey but each time over the past 4 years that i've applied they have never asked and simply deposited the money in my bank account.
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    (Original post by sharp910sh)
    I only get the train once or twice a week. So a season ticket will be more expensive.
    Indeed it will. But your original post which I quoted in my previous post stated that you went to work "everyday" from which I assumed you commuted daily. Obviously a season ticket isn't suited to your situation although it would have been to the one I perceived. Suggest you take your own advice and get on your bike. I did that over a similar distance (about 6 miles) in my last job and it saved lots of money Alternatively scrounge lifts.

    (Original post by Youngs)
    Great post, I agree with all of that.
    Yay! Somebody likes me I get quite excited about train fares, 'tis a bit sad.
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    (Original post by Recall)
    I don't know about the rest of the UK but in Scotland you can apply for travel expenses and recoup a large percentage of what you've spent on train/bus tickets. They supposedly ask for evidence of each journey but each time over the past 4 years that i've applied they have never asked and simply deposited the money in my bank account.
    Scotland, Land of the Free.*

    *Free Prescriptions, education, travel...

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    (Original post by Youngs)
    Scotland, Land of the Free.*

    *Free Prescriptions, education, travel...


    Not quite free travel yet - although with a bit of imagination with journey costs you never know...
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    (Original post by nearlyheadlessian)
    I would say that 1/3 off rail travel was really quite generous. On top of your heavily subsidised education.
    Unfortunately not as heavily subsidised here as it is in Scotland though :p: I meant transport wise. Perhaps I should have clarified that. I'm not going to pick holes in all government policies, so you don't need to go down that road. Besides (and please correct me if I'm wrong) I thought rail companies were privately owned nowadays? So therefore the discount isn't a gift from the government at all, but a form of keeping the money rolling in for National Rail? As I said, I could well be wrong about that.

    (Original post by nearlyheadlessian)
    You could try. You'll find most guards will charge you the difference between your ticket and a standard at the very least, if not making you purchase a brand new ticket at full price. And ticket inspectors at stations will be even less sympathetic.
    This is the risk you run, I agree. I not once suggested it was something the OP should do, just that it was something I was aware of :yep:
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    (Original post by nearlyheadlessian)
    Indeed it will. But your original post which I quoted in my previous post stated that you went to work "everyday" from which I assumed you commuted daily. Obviously a season ticket isn't suited to your situation although it would have been to the one I perceived. Suggest you take your own advice and get on your bike. I did that over a similar distance (about 6 miles) in my last job and it saved lots of money Alternatively scrounge lifts.



    Yay! Somebody likes me I get quite excited about train fares, 'tis a bit sad.
    Yes, may as well ride a bike. 5 quid can add up if i work 3 days a week for a month.
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    I use the train a lot, almost daily in the holidays, and I don't think it's that expensive -I've got a student railcard though, and I don't think £25 a year is that much considering it's 1/3 off and how often I use it. I do like travelling by train (and public transport in general, I don't drive and don't intend to learn, bike and foot are best for the environment!) though, and I'm lucky that the trains in my area are good. For me it's an hour to London (about 50 miles) and £15 for a day travelcard, £10.55 with discount, and £25 return to Cambridge (my uni as of October). Long distance train journeys can be quite expensive though, book online in advance at sites like thetrainline.com and megatrain.com for cheaper tickets! There's an article in the TSR wiki about train travel and discounts. Oh, and NatWest give you a free five year student railcard if you open a student bank account with them.
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    (Original post by emilyyy)
    Unfortunately not as heavily subsidised here as it is in Scotland though :p: I meant transport wise. Perhaps I should have clarified that. I'm not going to pick holes in all government policies, so you don't need to go down that road. Besides (and please correct me if I'm wrong) I thought rail companies were privately owned nowadays? So therefore the discount isn't a gift from the government at all, but a form of keeping the money rolling in for National Rail? As I said, I could well be wrong about that.
    Travel is only subsidised for students who are residents of Scotland sadly. The railways are indeed franchised out to private companies but it turns out that the railways can't really be run as a profitable business. Which means the government spends a substantial sum annually on the railways (albeit only bout 5% of what is spent on the roads, but I digress) for maintenance, rolling stock, stations and so on. The government choose franchise holders, subsidise almost everything on the network and regulate certain fare-types. In particular savers. Railcards are also regulated, the recent price rise is solely due to inflation (it had been £20/year for ages before the increase). There is no 'National Rail', they ceased to be in 1995, only AToC who split the cash proportionately between themselves. Everything's mess, basically
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    I'll be starting uni soon so I'll be having to get the train quite often (as I'll be travelling home) and even with discounts it'll still set me back about £15 per month. That'll equate to £180 per year!
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    I go to work 2 days a week and pay (rather company pays) 10 quid return for first class tickets on peak time trains. all i have to do is book the night before, on the day though a first class fare is about 20 quid (i think)

    get a 1/3 off

    journey of about 1hr 30 mins
 
 
 
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