bikes Watch

Andy H
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#21
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#21
Bike stealing is a sport, BMX would be prime material...
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Lidka
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#22
Report 10 years ago
#22
Andy and Chewwy are quite right. Don't buy anything flashy unless you're prepared to buy three locks and spend half your life in Cam being paranoid and locking and unlocking your bike (and even then, it's likely to be stolen if a thief wants it enough). Far better to get something cheap that'll do the job, but if it goes missing, it won't be a disappointment.
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-Matt-
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#23
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#23
(Original post by skelator)
I really need a bike. I start in October for my first year. I was thinking about getting a BMX as I have had normal/mountain/larger bikes in the past and feel a BMX will be better size wise. I'm just concerned about riding in the wet; can you get mudflaps on a BMX, and are there any negatives you can think of with having a BMX/would it be silly? Also, with regards locks, what's the best: chain/cable/D-lock? Also, how many would you get; one for the back wheel to frame; one for the front wheel to frame and one for the frame to something fixed? Or is this excessive?

Thanks in advance and sorry about all the questions. :p:
For a rear mudguard you could probably get away with fixing a smallish seatpost mounted guard designed for a mountain bike. There may be BMX specific mudguards sold somewhere (possible try the larger online stores like Chain Reaction Cycles and Wiggle), but you're unlikely to have much of a choice as the frame and forks won't be designed with mudguards in mind (clearance, fitting point etc.)

In terms of other disadvantages, small wheels will make riding, particularly at speed, more difficult, and the lack of gears could make hills a problem. Also generally your riding position isn't going to be very comfy and will make visibility in traffic poor.

That being said having a single speed transmission reduces the need for maintenance though this equally applies to singlespeed bikes with 26" or 700c wheels.

For locking, two would generally be sufficient as you can usually get a D-lock through the rear triangle, back-wheel and around a fixed bike stand, and then you can use another (cable) lock to go through the front wheel and frame. D- / U- locks are generally much stronger, but are also heavier and limit what you can lock to. And any lock is mainly a deterrent as most can be overcome fairly quickly with the right tools.

Matt
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Scary Monster
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#24
Report 10 years ago
#24
I'd second other peoples comments about a bmx, the (only) person I know with one agrees that it's harder work than a more normal bike but he likes playing on it so doesn't really care.

Because it's something different it's more likely to be stolen.

I don't know of anyone who's had an ordinary bike left somewhere vaguely sensible locked with a cable lock through the frame stolen.

If you're going to have one lock, go for a cable lock, if you're going to use two then may as well make one a D lock. That said, the most important thing with locks is that you'll be bothered to use them, it's really easy to get lazy. Far better with a cable lock through the frame all the time, than 3 locks with everything secured that you only use when your leaving it for any length of time or not in a rush.

Also worth bearing in mind that to lock things you need to be slightly creative sometime as most bike racks are jam packed full.
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