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    (Original post by Milady de Winter)
    Just do a law conversion course? It's easy to borrow the money for, and worthwhile because, as a lawyer, you will almost certainly be able to pay it back quite quickly. The conversion only takes one year, whereas Senior Status takes two, and you still have to do your BVC or LPC for a year after that anyway (which costs more money if you can't get a training contract).

    Conversions are the way forward. Well, I assume so, seeing as most of my History-grad friends are now solicitors and barristers
    Well, I would be very happy to do that. But I did have aspirations, assuming that I performed sufficiently academically, of reaching the heights of human rights law. Having looked through members lists of chambers, almost all such members tend to have Oxbridge degrees (be them in Law or another subject and then the GDL).

    Maybe I should just accept my lot and lower my sights.
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    I think it's better to concentrate on trying to get a 1st (that will make you stand out), go to a good law school for a conversion, and then, while there, network like mad to get pupillage in the best possible chambers. You will have to join an Inn of Court anyway, go to dinners and things like that, so you will have that opportunity to do so.

    I think the best thing you can do right now is try to establish contact with people who have recently qualified as lawyers - maybe get work experience in a chamber or something. As a non-lawyer, I don't wanrt to say 'do this' or 'do that', but I do think that the extra year and the extra money you are proposing to spend, in order to get Oxford on your CV, is not automatically the best path to follow.
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    (Original post by Milady de Winter)
    I think it's better to concentrate on trying to get a 1st (that will make you stand out), go to a good law school for a conversion, and then, while there, network like mad to get pupillage in the best possible chambers. You will have to join an Inn of Court anyway, go to dinners and things like that, so you will have that opportunity to do so.

    I think the best thing you can do right now is try to establish contact with people who have recently qualified as lawyers - maybe get work experience in a chamber or something. As a non-lawyer, I don't wanrt to say 'do this' or 'do that', but I do think that the extra year and the extra money you are proposing to spend, in order to get Oxford on your CV, is not automatically the best path to follow.
    I agree. I'll just work hard and see what happens; there's no point trying to beat the system.

    Thanks for your help anyway.
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    (Original post by jismith1989)
    So they don't charge accommodation/meal fees to undergraduates? That's what I meant by college fees.

    I will call them though, maybe after I've spent a bit of time at university (numero uno) to make sure that it is actually a viable option!
    Don't know if this has already been pointed out, but Oxbridge 'college fees' of about £5k/year are charged to all non-publicly-funded students (i.e. those not doing a first BA or PGCE, I think). It's basically a tuition fee for the college, so total tuition will be £8k/year - accommodation/food are a further cost on top of that.
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    Yes, that's right, as a senior status home student, you still pay the £3k, but also the college fees (around £5k depending on the college). And my college asked me to provide a financial guarantee which includes living costs (approx £30k for the 2 years).

    That said, you may qualify for NatWest professional studies loan (I managed to convince them that I qualify), since it's effectively equivalent to the GDL (bizarre phrasing I know).

    Check out my previous posts, as a lot of them are relevant.
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    (Original post by Darvo)
    Yes, that's right, as a senior status home student, you still pay the £3k, but also the college fees (around £5k depending on the college). And my college asked me to provide a financial guarantee which includes living costs (approx £30k for the 2 years).

    That said, you may qualify for NatWest professional studies loan (I managed to convince them that I qualify), since it's effectively equivalent to the GDL (bizarre phrasing I know).

    Check out my previous posts, as a lot of them are relevant.
    I found out yesterday that I've been approved for that NatWest loan. Not sure if I'll take it out yet, but this is definately a funding option for others to consider.
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    (Original post by Darvo)
    Yes, that's right, as a senior status home student, you still pay the £3k, but also the college fees (around £5k depending on the college). And my college asked me to provide a financial guarantee which includes living costs (approx £30k for the 2 years).

    That said, you may qualify for NatWest professional studies loan (I managed to convince them that I qualify), since it's effectively equivalent to the GDL (bizarre phrasing I know).

    Check out my previous posts, as a lot of them are relevant.
    Which college, just out of interest?
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    (Original post by *pitseleh*)
    Which college, just out of interest?
    Jesus. But I think all colleges would require a similar guarantee. I suppose it may be possible to come to an understanding though if you were interested in the loan.
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    (Original post by Darvo)
    Jesus. But I think all colleges would require a similar guarantee.
    :ditto: Mine (not Jesus) wanted one when I was going through the application paperwork for Clinical Medicine.
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    (Original post by Darvo)
    Jesus. But I think all colleges would require a similar guarantee. I suppose it may be possible to come to an understanding though if you were interested in the loan.
    Cheers. I'm not in any sort of position to be looking at postgrad loans just yet as I'm starting my BA in a week or so. But my college has asked for a similar financial guarantee for my undergrad funding (which doesn't seem to be the norm across the colleges) so I wondered if it was a routine thing when it comes to postgrad. It appears so!

    Thank-you.
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    That's not normal- i'd check with your college but normally they only need guarentees from international students. If they do want some guarentee, then i'd imagine showing them your funding approval from the SLC would be sufficient. Bit weird, though- which college?
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    (Original post by *pitseleh*)
    Cheers. I'm not in any sort of position to be looking at postgrad loans just yet as I'm starting my BA in a week or so. But my college has asked for a similar financial guarantee for my undergrad funding (which doesn't seem to be the norm across the colleges) so I wondered if it was a routine thing when it comes to postgrad. It appears so!

    Thank-you.
    Yes it is, because postgrad degrees aren't (usually) publicly funded, so universities need some form of proof that they'll get their money.

    In your case, though, might it have something to do with the fact that you're a part-time student?:dontknow:
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    Got this straight out of the oxford finance guide so should be right:

    "What if I am studying for a second undergraduate degree?"

    UK & EU nationals who have already completed an honours degree at a UK university, or have an equivalent qualification from an institution elsewhere in the EU, will not normally be eligible for the loans for tuition fees or maintenance, or for a government Maintenance Grant. Also, they will not receive an Oxford Opportunity Bursary. The university tuition fee for a second degree student has not been confirmed for 2008 entry onwards.

    Students studying a second undergraduate degree will also be liable for college fees. These are payable annually alongside the university tuition fee, and vary by college. In 2007/8 they ranged from £4,400 to £5,400 per year. Please contact colleges for further information.

    It's different for medicine.

    The course fees also vary from £11,205 to £12,810 per year.

    On top of this, you'd need to pay your accomodation, and living expenses, as well as society fees for the oxford union and any other 'clubs'. There's the potential for field trips etc too.

    I'm averaging it to be (from information in the booklet):
    Accomodation: £3,150 a year.
    Food: £1,500 a year (eating in halls)
    Course costs: £350
    Social activities/clothes/personal items: £1,500
    Transport: Low if own a bike. £500 a year if not.
    Course: £12,000 average
    College fees: £5,000 a year average

    That's around £24,000 a year. So over a three year course, you're looking at £72,000.

    Then there's also optional fees such as field trips, tv licence, stuff you buy FOR uni beforehand.

    Not trying to put you off - just giving a reasonable estimate.
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    (Original post by SophieSomething)
    That's around £24,000 a year. So over a three year course, you're looking at £72,000.

    Then there's also optional fees such as field trips, tv licence, stuff you buy FOR uni beforehand.

    Not trying to put you off - just giving a reasonable estimate.
    Agree with you completely, but most budget for two years in the assumption that they'll get senior status.
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    (Original post by SophieSomething)
    Course: £12,000 average
    This figure is plain wrong for a British student. The actual course fees for a second undergrad degree are the same for first undergrad degrees, i.e. around £3k. The total including college fees is around £8k, as it says towards the beginning of the thread.
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    (Original post by hobnob)
    Yes it is, because postgrad degrees aren't (usually) publicly funded, so universities need some form of proof that they'll get their money.

    In your case, though, might it have something to do with the fact that you're a part-time student?:dontknow:
    I'm not part-time!

    I don't know why it is, either. It doesn't bother me, but I did think it was a little strange.
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    (Original post by *pitseleh*)
    I'm not part-time!

    I don't know why it is, either. It doesn't bother me, but I did think it was a little strange.
    You're not? Sorry, I though you had said something along those lines earlier.:o:
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    (Original post by hobnob)
    You're not? Sorry, I though you had said something along those lines earlier.:o:
    Hee, nope. I was studying part-time this year, mind (was doing one A-level) so maybe that's what it was.
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    (Original post by *pitseleh*)
    Hee, nope. I was studying part-time this year, mind (was doing one A-level) so maybe that's what it was.
    Ah, yes, that must have been it. I was sure you had mentioned something about studying part-time. At least I'm not going completely mad, then.
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    (Original post by hobnob)
    Ah, yes, that must have been it. I was sure you had mentioned something about studying part-time. At least I'm not going completely mad, then.
    Hee hee - no, not completely! :p:
 
 
 
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