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    (Original post by 9mm)
    Does anyone know how Paris living costs compare with London?
    about the same, maybe 10% or so cheaper. a lot / most french practises won't pay part 1 students though, its considered to be a staige (you would be a staigiare) and that means you are expected to work gratis for the experience.... nicht gut

    which ends up making paris a very expensive place to live sans salaire...
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    (Original post by 9mm)
    Does anyone know how Paris living costs compare with London?
    how did you get so many warning points :laugh:?
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    (Original post by jrhartley)
    about the same, maybe 10% or so cheaper. a lot / most french practises won't pay part 1 students though, its considered to be a staige (you would be a staigiare) and that means you are expected to work gratis for the experience.... nicht gut

    which ends up making paris a very expensive place to live sans salaire...
    Alright thanks, yeah I was thinking about once you've completed your degree.

    I just wondering because I'd prefer to move somewhere abroad, so just seeing where I'd be able to go (although it's probably a bit early to start thinking about that now).
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    So if i did part 1, could i then do a postgraduate in something like marketing/advertising? only i know that hardly any graduates actually become architects..... what can you do at post grad. from an architecture degree?
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    lol if your going to go into marketing.. why go through the hellish degree? why not just apply somewhere with a good marketing course?

    If you're going to go and do something else, I can think of easier ways of doing the 'other stuff' than going through the architecture road. I mean we all go thorugh the phases of doubt and reflection, the "whats it all worth" thoughts.. I can assure you as you enter year 2/3 they'll get stronger.
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    I am now sick of people telling me 'not to study Architecture' for whatever reasons.

    OP don't listen to these students' posts. Architecture students complain ALL THE TIME. Thats the only thing they are good at. They have a negative opinion on EVERYTHING because they are a bunch of perfectionists (okay, slight over exaggeration there... but you get my gist).

    Theres no right or wrong degree. You can go into Marketing after doing a architecture degree, you don't need a masters in Marketing to do this.
    Most jobs don't require a specific degree unless its a qualified job that needs qualifications.
    When i went to my open day at university, they said Architecture is a great generic degree to do, if you want to learn about society and the place we live in.

    btw don't listen to Archiboi, he spents too much time procrastinating.
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    OP - bear in mind that yeahyeahyeahs is just starting K100 and is therefore full of the joys of spring about it, as I was in my first six months of first year! Archiboi and I have finished it, so we might have a clearer idea of the hell that lies ahead for you. its not being negative, its being realistic. i've done a degree in economics and a degree in architecture. personally, i think architecture is a rotten way to spend three years as an undergraduate unless you are really fired up about it. to go to university as a 18 or 19 year old and then spend your life working all hours eliminates one of the important sides of university - social networking. i lived with someone for two years who was doing his first degree in architecture, and like pretty much all the other 20-21 year olds in their second year of k100, he was fed up with the way that the course monopolised every moment of his life. sure, he loved the idea of architecture, and he's still on the course at masters level, but he resented the fact that he had no time to develop as a person outside his subject and very little time to do anything but architecture...

    hence the comments that you need to be hot to trot for architecture. if you're not, you will end up just getting annoyed at seeing people on other courses with 6 hours of lectures a week and one essay a term workload just lording it up every day of the week in the sunshine.
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    The 'joys of spring' is very truth.

    Maybe I wait three years and see what happens, and if i still love/hate architecture as I do now.
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    I've got a question. If (and I know at this stage it's impossible to know truly what you think) you happen to have a passion for architecture and couldn't think of any other degree that you'd like to do better, would you recommend to that person not do study it albeit their love for the subject, due to the way the system works, how the course is structured, and the scarcity of job prospects? And to those who've already finished their degree, if you could start again, would you do architecture or choose to do something else despite your interest in the subject?
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    (Original post by 9mm)
    I've got a question. If (and I know at this stage it's impossible to know truly what you think) you happen to have a passion for architecture and couldn't think of any other degree that you'd like to do better, would you recommend to that person not do study it albeit their love for the subject, due to the way the system works, how the course is structured, and the scarcity of job prospects? And to those who've already finished their degree, if you could start again, would you do architecture or choose to do something else despite your interest in the subject?
    I'd advise people to go ahead with it. Even though it is hard, and there'e no denying it, it teaches you a hell of a lot about the world around you and like yeahyeahyeahs said, it's a good all round degree that many professions value and so you could find yourself moving into something other than architecture very easily afterwards. Employers recognise how tough it is and this pays off.

    I love architecture, but i have thought of other things i'm interested in, such as graphic design, etc. but i would never swap my first degree for anything else. Even though it's frustrating and takes up your time so much, it's very satisfying to know that you're completing one of the hardest degrees around. And transferring to do other courses afterwards is very possible.

    For those who decide to go for it, you'll soon know what i mean
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    (Original post by rmyl)
    I'd advise people to go ahead with it.
    ditto. follow your passion - its better to do something you're passionate about that's a slog and may not have the best career prospects / remuneration than to do something that is easy / pays well, etc. you get a great bang for your grant buck at degree level for architecture, its impossible to do as an Open University / distance learning degree (unlike pretty much any other subject you might be interested in) so if you've the passion, take advantage of the opportunity. You can always learn marketing or economics from books later if you change your mind. the point is, you need to go into it fired up. If you're lukewarm on day one of first year, I think that person would struggle to see it through the three years.
 
 
 
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