Inns of Court certificates of honour Watch

Evil_Genius
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#21
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#21
...in my case, not caring about having money beyond being able to afford rent and icecream makes the choice a lot less stressful...
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PDJM
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#22
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#22
Last year the cheques for Middle were sent out around Christmas. There is no certificate, rather it is an extra line on your call certificate. You may also end up with a more senior award (one is c£600), but you won’t get a cheque for both- just the higher of the two.
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Pupillage_Hunter
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#23
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#23
(Original post by PDJM)
Last year the cheques for Middle were sent out around Christmas. There is no certificate, rather it is an extra line on your call certificate. You may also end up with a more senior award (one is c£600), but you won’t get a cheque for both- just the higher of the two.
Thank you - very helpful information. Aside from anything else it'd be a nice thing to be able to put on the CV.
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chalks
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#24
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#24
(Original post by TommehR)
I can complete understand that and it is probably going to be one of the most frustrating things about the profession. You only need to look at firms who are laying off associates, freezing salaries, not awarding bonuses, and cancelling parties while at the same time experiencing record Partner profits, to realise that the system is a little rough.

Then again, very few professions have pay arrangements whereby you receive all the profits that you make for a company, and looking at how much I'll hopefully be earning in my early-mid 20s makes it difficult for me to complain too much. Beyond that, who knows?

EDIT: That's the second time you've made me chuckle this evening, stewarding all day must have really fried my brain.
Well, its simply the difference between being employed and being self-employed. The latter (whether you're a plumber, actor, barrister, independent consultant or whatever) carries with it greater degrees of risk, upside, flexibility and independence. Those may, or may not, be good things.
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Lord Hysteria
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#25
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#25
(Original post by chalks)
Well, its simply the difference between being employed and being self-employed. The latter (whether you're a plumber, actor, barrister, independent consultant or whatever) carries with it greater degrees of risk, upside, flexibility and independence. Those may, or may not, be good things.
or if you are employed then you have the great knowledge that a certain percentage of the money you generate to the legal firm goes straight into the pocket of the partners.
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chalks
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#26
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#26
(Original post by Lord Hysteria)
or if you are employed then you have the great knowledge that a certain percentage of the money you generate to the legal firm goes straight into the pocket of the partners.
Yes, but they are the ones that own the business and bear the associated risks of that. I once acted for a partner in a major law firm which was embroiled in a nasty prof neg dispute for which the firm's insurers refused to accept liability. Each of the partners was required to regularly chip in 5 figure sums to cover mounting legal costs. Fortunately, the matter was resolved before it got to judgment: an adverse finding could have bankrupted individual partners.

I think it's a mistake to think of the money earned by a law firm as being money that you as an individual solicitor generated but which is going into someone else's hands (i.e. the partners'). Because firms operate this rather antiquated time-based billing method, it can lead to individuals thinking "I earned $x and I didn't see a cent!". There would be less of that mindset if firms operated on a different billing structure ie a fixed fee basis or percentage of deal value.
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TommehR
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#27
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#27
(Original post by chalks)
Yes, but they are the ones that own the business and bear the associated risks of that. I once acted for a partner in a major law firm which was embroiled in a nasty prof neg dispute for which the firm's insurers refused to accept liability. Each of the partners was required to regularly chip in 5 figure sums to cover mounting legal costs. Fortunately, the matter was resolved before it got to judgment: an adverse finding could have bankrupted individual partners.
Purely out of interest, do you know if this would still be the case for LLPs? I would imagine (although my knowledge of Company Law is still in early days) that limited liability would generally prevent the sort of bankruptcy that you refer to, but would it still be the general practice for partners to have to chip in large amounts of money to cover legal costs?

As I say, this is just simple curiosity and I'm not expecting you to know the answer.
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chalks
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#28
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#28
In simple terms, an LLP will offer protection to a firm's partners in the same way as a company protects shareholders - namely, you can't lose more than you invest.

So - to the extent that damages awarded against a firm exceeds an LLP's assets etc then the partners will not be required to dip into their own pockets. The firm would, however, go belly up so the partners might be inclined to bail it out.

The LLP protection does not, however, give the partners any protection from any requirement to fund legal costs if an insurer refuses to accept liability.
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Evil_Genius
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#29
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Chalks, dude, you seem to have far too much free time on your hands.

Do not make me send you my CV as busywork!
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chalks
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#30
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#30
Multi-tasking mate. Plus, my line of work isn't affected by the financial crisis so I'm not getting flogged like most lawyers.

Happy to look at CVs.
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Evil_Genius
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#31
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#31
Terrific--I'll send you mine tomorrow, just to make sure you don't forget the pleasing taste of English barristerial arrogance
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chalks
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#32
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#32
No dramas.

I won't be able to look at it until next Monday however: I'm on a surf trip all weekend.

I love this country sometimes.
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Evil_Genius
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#33
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No rush at all. I have Three Days of Hell, starting Monday next week: an assessed mini-pupillage, an interview at Brick Court and an FRU test, all on one terrifying day. Also, there is about 30 minutes between the three, so I better find a real breakneck taxi driver
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chalks
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#34
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#34
Given you have a mini-pupillage and a Brick Court interview already set up, is there any reason to doubt that your CV is good enough?
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Evil_Genius
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#35
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#35
It is obviously good enough for a mini-pupillage *interview* at Brick Court, but that's hardly a reflection on the eventual pupillage process. I am certainly not going to bask in my glory and become complacent

Besides, I would hate to strip you of the opportunity to put on your Patronising Cap and lecture me on the finer points of self-aggrandisement
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chalks
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#36
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#36
(Original post by Evil_Genius)
Besides, I would hate to strip you of the opportunity to put on your Patronising Cap and lecture me on the finer points of self-aggrandisement
I never take it off.
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Simon Myerson QC
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#37
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#37
Guys - as my kids would say, get a room
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Heidi86
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#38
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#38
I think they got a room.

But if Evil_Genius re-surfaces can he tell me how the FRU test went. I've got mine this week.
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Evil_Genius
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#39
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#39
As is often the case with exams/tests I take, it either went brilliantly or terribly. Only time will tell. I was riling from a rather unpleasant interview just minutes prior and probably didn't have my head in it, though.

It is very much as described on the tin---you needn't know any law whatsoever, as it is all provided, in form of edited excerpts from the ERA 96/ EA 2002--just read it carefully, then apply it. I must warn you that the scenario is not clear cut (although I may have overcomplicated matters, as I usually do) and you do need to substantiate your answers.

Let me know how it goes. I'm still looking for a few easily influenced persons to be my post-forwarding-minions as I'm based on the North East--so I shall appear friendly and courteous in answering your questions
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Heidi86
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#40
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#40
I am sure you will be fine. After all you are a Genius.

Thank you for info. I will let you know if I am successful.

I'm not surprised that you are still looking for "easily influenced persons to be your post forwarding minions" After all you are Evil.

But, as you shall try and appear friendly and courteous, so shall I. No problem at all. I live close to the office, so let me know when duties commence
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