Fat burning cardio Watch

Runner
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#21
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#21
(Original post by Lady Venom)
Right. You will burn more muscle doing long cross country type runs. Interval training will cut into your fat far better if you do intervals over say 400m. You can do longer interval runs as well e.g. 600m, 800m and I can definitely say they are cardiovascular type runs. There is no harm in doing 1 long run but you'll want to keep the pace up. If you want good muscle interval training will make your stronger. Runners World has some longer interval type programs. Personal trainers want to make money. We here at TSR want to help you. TBH I listen to people on TSR more because they actually work out......

EDIT: Just seen Rainy's post an agree wholeheartedly. There is no right and wrong; I'd just prescribed interval training with a higher emphasis that long runs based on what works for me because of my muscle type. Try them all, find what you like and stick with it.
No. Long runs at a slow 'steady state' are very effective for burning fat. Most bodybuilders I know use it (people who have under 7% fat) rather than HIIT. I use it from time to time - it helped me get a six pack. If you keep it slow and steady, have a strong diet and are on a weight training program, you'll see excellent results. I still recommend HIIT, but it's not to be dismissed and it can be great to mix things up.

Complete rubbish about personal trainers. As long as you go to a good gym, you'll meet very knowledgeable people who can help you specifically - much better than some students through an internet forum who can't design a program for you!
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Bebbs
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#22
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#22
Lol. I can see this guy becoming popular.
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Runner
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#23
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#23
(Original post by Bebbs)
Lol. I can see this guy becoming popular.
I think HIIT is great. But it's always important to change as much as you can to avoid plateau.
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Lady Venom
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#24
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#24
(Original post by Bebbs)
Lol. I can see this guy becoming popular.
Me too. I have lots of Fail pics ready.... :p:
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Lady Venom
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#25
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#25
(Original post by Runner)
much better than some students through an internet forum who can't design a program for you!
What a combination of guys and girls who's lives revolve around running/gymming/weightlifting? Not all personal trainers do to be honest.... I'd be happy to say I'm fitter and have a better body than most female personal trainers. And TBH I'll start believing in personal trainers when stop coming on here sprouting the rubbish that their personal trainer told them..... I have yet to hear of a PT who's suggested Rippetoes for example. Or a PT that does Fartlek.
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ch0c0h01ic
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#26
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#26
(Original post by Runner)
Complete rubbish about personal trainers. As long as you go to a good gym, you'll meet very knowledgeable people who can help you specifically - much better than some students through an internet forum who can't design a program for you!


I love your sarcasm, I can see us one day becoming bosom buddies.

Yes, there are lots of 'good'/well equipped gyms out there, but only a handful have 'knowledgeable' people who can, and do, give good advice. At home for example, I know of only one proper lifting gym where I could go to to get good advice in 10+ miles. Sure, we have lots of well equipped health centres, Next Generation, Bannatynes, etc, but places where you can get good advice are few and far between.

Better than students? How many PTs do you know who are studying degrees which cover physiology, nutrition, anatomy, biochemistry, etc. I'd say I'm quite a bit more qualified than your PT down at the gym who gained his qualification through attending a few evening classes, or even someone who went to the effort of getting a sports science degree. Plus there is all of the background reading, and personal training experience, that I have as well. Sure, sometimes I get PTs and other 'experts' trying to give me advice, needless to say I know better and I ignore them.

Again, since when has a PT you know recommended 5x5, or RossTraining, or Crossfit, or 3x5?

When has a PT recommended 1000s of crunches, 4x12-15 of all the weights machines in the gym, lots of isolation exercises, bodypart splits for beginners? A huge amount of times. Stay on the forum long enough and you will see the 'excellent' routines that PTs have recommended.
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Xtrm2Matt
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#27
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#27
(Original post by Runner)
No. Long runs at a slow 'steady state' are very effective for burning fat.
How would you define a long run? 30 minutes? 1 hour? Or distance?
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Runner
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#28
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#28
(Original post by ch0c0h01ic)


I love your sarcasm, I can see us one day becoming bosom buddies.

Yes, there are lots of 'good'/well equipped gyms out there, but only a handful have 'knowledgeable' people who can, and do, give good advice. At home for example, I know of only one proper lifting gym where I could go to to get good advice in 10+ miles. Sure, we have lots of well equipped health centres, Next Generation, Bannatynes, etc, but places where you can get good advice are few and far between.

Better than students? How many PTs do you know who are studying degrees which cover physiology, nutrition, anatomy, biochemistry, etc. I'd say I'm quite a bit more qualified than your PT down at the gym who gained his qualification through attending a few evening classes, or even someone who went to the effort of getting a sports science degree. Plus there is all of the background reading, and personal training experience, that I have as well. Sure, sometimes I get PTs and other 'experts' trying to give me advice, needless to say I know better and I ignore them.

Again, since when has a PT you know recommended 5x5, or RossTraining, or Crossfit, or 3x5?

When has a PT recommended 1000s of crunches, 4x12-15 of all the weights machines in the gym, lots of isolation exercises, bodypart splits for beginners? A huge amount of times. Stay on the forum long enough and you will see the 'excellent' routines that PTs have recommended.
I have always found personal trainers to give good advice. I never commented on the quality of any advice received by students in general (although one piece of advice was off above - which isn't doing much for your cause!). And advice is best given for your specific body type and physique. I have never heard of PTs recommending that - if so, I wouldn't believe they were proper trainers; those myths are the first debunked to anyone with a mile of the fitness community (look for the qualifications in the article below). I don't know what gyms you're talking about. However, what I have said is perfectly reasonable. I've been training for 9 years - I've never heard such derogatory responses to something like that. I have quite a few professional bodybuilders and athletes in my family - and they would certainly agree that asking personal trainers are the best way forward.

http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/ivan7.htm
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Runner
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#29
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#29
(Original post by Xtrm2Matt)
How would you define a long run? 30 minutes? 1 hour? Or distance?
About 30-45 minutes. No more. I advise reading Tom Venuto's book, 'Burn the fat', which will explain far better than I or any other members of this forum. It's widely regarded to be one of the best intro books on the market. You can download it for free if you look hard enough.
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RawJoh1
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#30
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#30
(Original post by Runner)
I have always found personal trainers to give good advice. I never commented on the quality of any advice received by students in general (although one piece of advice was off above - which isn't doing much for your cause!). And advice is best given for your specific body type and physique. I have never heard of PTs recommending that - if so, I wouldn't believe they were proper trainers; those myths are the first debunked to anyone with a mile of the fitness community (look for the qualifications in the article below). I don't know what gyms you're talking about. However, what I have said is perfectly reasonable. I've been training for 9 years - I've never heard such derogatory responses to something like that. I have quite a few professional bodybuilders and athletes in my family - and they would certainly agree that asking personal trainers are the best way forward.

http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/ivan7.htm
I think chocoholic's right. If a skinny guy goes to a gym and tells them he wants to bulk up, he'll be designed a split routine involving lots of isolations and lots of machines. He won't be told to get squatting and drink lots of milk.

I think that's probably true for 9/10 gyms, tbh.
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Bebbs
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#31
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#31
Gyms which give good advice are proper powerlifting gyms, where everything is iron and barbell and any of the crossfit affiliates. I don't trust advice from people that I know don't know what they are talking about.

Take the average personal trainer, how many years will they have been PTing for? On average I would guess several. Now look at the average PT, how strong is he? On average I would say not very. How big is he, again on average I would say not very.

Considering its not unheard of from people to go from untrained -> Competeting in PL comps in a years time. I would wonder why the personal trainers cannot take some of their own excellent advice.


Just so you cannot pick me up on semantics, I am talking about my experience of PTs, as well as accounts from other people on different forums. I am more than happy to admit that certain Personal Trainers are knowledgable about their jobs. On the majority, they are not. I would imagine if you went into a Drs office with a broken arm, and the DR gave you similarly crap advice, their would be a lawsuit. I will probably never understand why personal trainers are allowed to have such lax controls on their qualifications.
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Sandhu
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#32
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#32
Lulz
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ch0c0h01ic
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#33
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#33
(Original post by Runner)
I have always found personal trainers to give good advice. I never commented on the quality of any advice received by students in general (although one piece of advice was off above - which isn't doing much for your cause!). And advice is best given for your specific body type and physique. I have never heard of PTs recommending that - if so, I wouldn't believe they were proper trainers; those myths are the first debunked to anyone with a mile of the fitness community (look for the qualifications in the article below). I don't know what gyms you're talking about. However, what I have said is perfectly reasonable. I've been training for 9 years - I've never heard such derogatory responses to something like that. I have quite a few professional bodybuilders and athletes in my family - and they would certainly agree that asking personal trainers are the best way forward.

http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/ivan7.htm
Talking from my experience (I've been in a fair few gyms) and my experience on this forum, gym PTs on the whole are a waste of time. At the gym I use currently I have watched their 'trainers' do a lot of stupid, if not dangerous things and give out some very generic and crap advice. On the forum we get people coming in week in, week out with really crap routines that their 'personal trainer' devised.

Let's be realistic, anyone can become a PT. It is very loosely regulated if at all. With a few evening classes that my local gym offered, and a bit of on the job experience I could rebrand myself as a personal trainer.

Sure, there are some experienced, excellent operators out there, but they're a small minority. Sure, for the inexperienced and unknowledgeable going to a good trainer would be a good idea, but put enough work in and you get to the stage that you effectively become your own personal trainer.

Again, yes, some students are wrong, that is why you go by reputation and accept the advice of someone who is much more experienced, just as you would with a personal trainer.
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Xtrm2Matt
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#34
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#34
(Original post by Runner)
About 30-45 minutes. No more. I advise reading Tom Venuto's book, 'Burn the fat', which will explain far better than I or any other members of this forum. It's widely regarded to be one of the best intro books on the market. You can download it for free if you look hard enough.
Ta dude. I usually do 30 minutes anyways but I'll see if I can find said book and give it a read.
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