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    (Original post by Lord Huntroyde)
    But they are interested in books you've read and you could talk about those books in your interview.
    No, that sort of question wasn't asked.
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    (Original post by Unregistered)
    No, that sort of question wasn't asked.
    It may not be asked, but I know people who told the interviewers what books they rea and then the topic turned to what the books meant, their relevance/importance etc.
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    (Original post by Unregistered)
    If it's Oxford you are applying to, from what I know, most of the interviews tend to be centred round the written work submitted. It's more important that you can answer questions on those. Carr et al form part of a historiography module once there.
    No..I shall be applying to Cambridge, and, from what I've been told, they like candidates to have a sound knowledge of the theory of History.
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    Here's some useful information on historiography (from Wikipedia):

    Historiography is writing about rather than of history. Historiography is meta-analysis of descriptions of the past. The analysis usually focuses on the narrative, interpretations, worldview, use of evidence, or method of presentation of other historians.

    An example
    A person living at a time witnesses events. If she writes about the events she witnessed she has created a primary source. When a historian uses the primary source (to discuss events witnessed) in another text we now have a secondary source. When another historian argues that the secondary source misuses (or correctly uses) the primary source, we have historiography.

    Some of the basic questions considered in historiography are:

    • Who wrote the source (primary or secondary)?
    • For primary sources, we look at the person in her or his society, for secondary sources, we consider the theoretical orientation of the approach for example, Marxist or Annales School, ( "total history"), political history, etc.
    • What was the view of history when the source was written?
    • Was history supposed to provide moral lessons?
    • What or who was the intended audience?
    • What sources were privileged or ignored in the narrative?

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    (Original post by kildare)
    “In Pursuit of History” is a solid, modern look at History as an academic subject. It’s a very readable work, and gives a broad introduction to the most pertinent questions faced by any student of history. I think one of its greatest strengths is Tosh’s even handed, apolitical look at issues of history.

    Collingwood’s book is a great read for anyone (such as myself) who is interested in both history and philosophy and the interplay between the two subjects. While you may not agree with his stance that “all history is the history of ideas” I don’t think you would be able to read him without finding his arguments intellectually stimulating.

    I’ll post an opinion on “In Defence of History” once I get around to reading it:P
    Thank you very much!!!
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    (Original post by Tek)
    That is the role of the Historian, to collect all the facts available to him and to produce a version of events which he feels are most relevant. Historical facts are facts which have influenced or shaped the world and which have affected more than a few individuals, for example the shooting of Arch Duke Ferdinand was one of the chance causes of World War I, and should be recorded as a historical fact becase it affected so many people, but the chance shooting of a British 'tommy' during World War I had little impact except to a few of his relatives, and consequently it would not be recorded as a historical fact, but it is a fact nonetheless.

    My my, you have been reading your Dr. Carr! I'd be careful with that book, i mentioned I agreed with what he says about the role of society upon history and the historian but my form tutor says they all hate the book! I think he raises some interesting points, if a bit outdated now. Some good books i've read on Philosophy Of History are:
    J.Tosh 'The Purpose of History'
    'What is History Now?'
    All of these are pretty good but are dodgy in parts, but help you to form your own opinions about it all. Well, they've certainly helped me!
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    (Original post by Tek)
    No..I shall be applying to Cambridge, and, from what I've been told, they like candidates to have a sound knowledge of the theory of History.
    I had a mock interview @ peterhouse and they asked me 'What is history?' and asked me what I could learn about the 19th Century from Dickens , and the limitation of him as a historian. They wouldn't take the dramatic licence he uses distorting facts as an acceptable answer.
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    (Original post by Parand)
    OK, but how can you determine which facts have influenced or shaped the world. Tony Blair's parents meeting have 'shaped the world' as has everything in his life which lead to him becoming Prime Minister. It is impossible to file events into important/ quite important/ irrelevent. Every event has an infinate number of causes, all of equal importance. Ignore Carr.
    I see your point, but still I'd say that some facts are more important in shaping the course of history than others. I agree with Carr in that historical "facts" need to be subordinated in order to be able to keep an overview of them. Tony Blair's parents' meeting was obviously important, otherwise he wouldn't be here to be Prime Minister, but e.g. the day he joined the Labour Party is far more important historically (in my opinion) because this has started his political career. Also, for instance, the birth of Julius Caesar was far more important than the birth of, say, a Roman slave. Surely, without slavery the Roman upper class would not have been as wealthy and powerful, but nevertheless Caesar has made much more of a mark on history than that slave.

    I also believe that the causes for events are not all of the same importance and that it is possible to establish a certain "rank" in them. This would certainly be controversial, with people each stressing different causes and factors. For example, I believe that social and economic factors were more important than the role of Bismarck in the unification of Germany because without a strong economy, Bismarck would not have been able to carry out the unification, no matter how clever he was. Ok, this is all open for debate, I'm just using it as an example.
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    Try Arthur Marwick - a great writer on historiography. Are you doing the AEA in history? I did it and books like Marwick's and Tosh's are great preparation. If you are very interested in the philosophy of history you could try reading Hegel, but its not easy!!!!

    The best writer to investigate though is definitely Marwick.

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    Just pause for thought and wonder what kind of teenagers spend their weekends discussing history on an internet forum about education.
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    (Original post by Parand)
    OK, but how can you determine which facts have influenced or shaped the world. Tony Blair's parents meeting have 'shaped the world' as has everything in his life which lead to him becoming Prime Minister. It is impossible to file events into important/ quite important/ irrelevent. Every event has an infinate number of causes, all of equal importance. Ignore Carr.
    I disagree. Whilst his parents meeting was important, it did not shape the history of the world in any way. It merely created the potential for someone to change the world; this happens during any moment of contraception the world over. It wasn't an important historical fact at all because it had no direct impact on anyone. Events such as Tony Blair joining the Labour Party have had much more impact because they are a lot more relevent and have affected a great many people. If you're going to be too pedantic and take things back to peoples' parents having sex, then you need to go back to their parents having sex, etc, until you find the very root of history. Not only that, but talking about peoples' births is completely irrelevent to their historical importance as it, in itself, has no relevence to anything whatsoever, other than making the parents happy at having conceived a child. It's quite unhistorical.
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    (Original post by Pleasure)
    Just pause for thought and wonder what kind of teenagers spend their weekends discussing history on an internet forum about education.
    Just pause for thought and wonder how many other teenagers spend their weekends lying in bed playing computer games, wasting their lives and killing their brain cells. At least this is interesting.
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    Taking drugs, having meaningless sex, it's part of life, but you'd rather spend your saturday night on the internet
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    (Original post by Pleasure)
    Taking drugs, having meaningless sex, it's part of life, but you'd rather spend your saturday night on the internet
    Its only 5pm; time for hedonism (or theology essays) :-( later.

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    (Original post by Pleasure)
    Taking drugs, having meaningless sex, it's part of life, but you'd rather spend your saturday night on the internet
    Anyone else spot the irony?
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    History is history.
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    "God is dead" - Nietzche

    "Nietzche is dead" - God

    This joke is enshrined on the wall of the girls' loos in the Rad Cam and made me chuckle.

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    (Original post by Toffee)
    History is history.
    Yes, but what is history?
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    History is the study of the past events and attempts to provide a philosophical explanation for them.
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    every day create your history
    every path you take you're leaving you're legacy
    Every soldier dies in glory
    Every legend tells of conquest and liberty.

    (Michael Jackon).

    Next week: Jacko puts a 21st Century spin on the pressing question 'What is Englightenment?'.
 
 
 
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