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    (Original post by Unregistered)
    That Lord preaches like he's about 20, but really he hasnt even done his GCSEs yet.
    Just shows how intelligent he is, i.e. extremely.

    (Original post by Tek)
    Just shows how intelligent he is, i.e. extremely.
    Not intelligent, arrogant.
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    (Original post by Unregistered)
    Not intelligent, arrogant.
    So it's arrogant to talk about careers when you haven't done your GCSEs is it? What about people who never bother taking the exams? Are they arrogant just because they talk about getting jobs, yet they lack any formal qualifications?

    Or how about you stfu and leave him alone?
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    (Original post by Tek)
    So it's arrogant to talk about careers when you haven't done your GCSEs is it? What about people who never bother taking the exams? Are they arrogant just because they talk about getting jobs, yet they lack any formal qualifications?

    Or how about you stfu and leave him alone?
    This may come in handy, unreg, http://acronymsearch.com/
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    (Original post by king of swords)
    This may come in handy, unreg, http://acronymsearch.com/
    Yes, unreg may need to look up the term 'GCSE'.
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    LoL
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    (Original post by Unregistered)
    An absolutely crap list Lord Huntroyde

    You might as well do a:

    Law degree
    Accountancy Degree
    Management Degree

    A Classics degree doesn't 'put' you into any career. Which may or may not be a good thing, depending on what your interests are and how sure you are of any possible careers you want to do. It does however show that you are an artisic, creative person who can write essays and is a good linguist.
    Many see law as a post grad subject now, and you are at no disadvantage doing the conversion.

    There are no prerequisites for accountancy qualifications, so there is no reason why you should do accountancy.

    I do not like management degrees, they are incredibly vague and, as vienna has said before, only of any real value when they are specific to a particular industry.

    There are many degrees such as classics which are not vocational, and they often open the most doors.
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    (Original post by Unregistered)
    what kind of careers can u go into with a classics degree? i can only think of 2:
    museum work
    teaching
    Those are the main two (apart from academic research) where a classics degree might be essential, but there are plenty of other jobs -- I keep on reading that around 40% of graduate jobs are degree non-specific.

    Almost all graduate careers do require some post-graduate education (be it formal or "on the job"), even for people who have done supposedly "useful" degrees.

    I asked about what previous Classics grads from my school had done: one is now a journalist, another is working for the World Bank in the Balkans, another is in a publishing company, one converted to law, one is writing a PhD, and yes one is a teacher. Also Classics is apparently very good for computing and accountancy. For myself I am not sure, but I am thinking about trying to become a diplomat, a career for which a Classics degree would be very sound. Of my schoolmates who are applying for Classics, one wants to work for the UN and another wants either to become an army officer or convert to law.

    It is of course possible to do a law, accountancy, computer science, or journalism degree to start with -- but doing something totally non-vocational beforehand provides a training which employers value, and it is also interesting and thus makes you a more interesting person.

    (Original post by Tek)
    Yes, unreg may need to look up the term 'GCSE'.
    Im sure I wont. I did fine in mine thank you very much. Getting your GCSE results a few months ago must have been nerve wracking Tek. How old r u? 16?
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    (Original post by Alexander)
    I asked about what previous Classics grads from my school had done: one is now a journalist, another is working for the World Bank in the Balkans, another is in a publishing company, one converted to law, one is writing a PhD, and yes one is a teacher. Also Classics is apparently very good for computing and accountancy. For myself I am not sure, but I am thinking about trying to become a diplomat, a career for which a Classics degree would be very sound. Of my schoolmates who are applying for Classics, one wants to work for the UN and another wants either to become an army officer or convert to law.
    Wish your friend good luck with his MPhil in International Relations then. Also, aren't modern langauges more important for the diplomatic service? Notwithstanding the fact that English and French are the two languages that you *must* speak for a career with them.
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    (Original post by Tek)
    Wish your friend good luck with his MPhil in International Relations then. Also, aren't modern langauges more important for the diplomatic service? Notwithstanding the fact that English and French are the two languages that you *must* speak for a career with them.
    Diplomats may need to learn an obscure language as they could be posted anywhere in the world, thus modern languages aren't really necessary. Having learnt the classical languages, this ought to be good training for learning more. You are correct the French is still, to a certain extent, the language of diplomacy, but I did it up to AS and I could take it up again.
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    (Original post by Alexander)
    Diplomats may need to learn an obscure language as they could be posted anywhere in the world, thus modern languages aren't really necessary. Having learnt the classical languages, this ought to be good training for learning more. You are correct the French is still, to a certain extent, the language of diplomacy, but I did it up to AS and I could take it up again.
    I would have thought that learning modern foreign languages would be better training to learn an obscure language than classics would be.
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    (Original post by Toffee)
    I would have thought that learning modern foreign languages would be better training to learn an obscure language than classics would be.
    I would say about equal. However Classics is considerably broader in the education it gives than a modern language, as it includes history, anthropology, and often philosophy.
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    (Original post by Alexander)
    I would say about equal. However Classics is considerably broader in the education it gives than a modern language, as it includes history, anthropology, and often philosophy.
    Yes, but at least you can go abroad and speak the modern languages
    And, imho, being able to speak French, German and English is more useful than Latin, Greek and English, especially for a career abroad.
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    (Original post by Tek)
    Yes, but at least you can go abroad and speak the modern languages
    But this only really worthwhile if you can speak fluently or good enough to actually live somewhere, otherwise there isn't really too much point, as basic language can often be enough.
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    (Original post by theone)
    But this only really worthwhile if you can speak fluently or good enough to actually live somewhere, otherwise there isn't really too much point, as basic language can often be enough.
    Studying a modern language to A2 is usually enough to be able to speak it abroad quite comfortably.

    (Original post by Tek)
    Studying a modern language to A2 is usually enough to be able to speak it abroad quite comfortably.
    Are you joking ... a grade E in A level French would not enable you to speak comfortably in France.

    (Original post by Lord Huntroyde)
    And it's probably the easiest way of getting into Oxbridge
    Classics is one of the least demanding subjects (academically that is) to get into at Oxbridge. Not only is the ratio of applicants to places very low but the requirements are also low. In Cambridge they require Latin or Greek at AS level and overall AAB. No STEP!!P.
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    (Original post by Unregistered)
    I didnt say they werent employable, I was just making a mockery of Lord Whatshisnames 'list' of possible careers for a classics postgrad - as they were all post graduate training programmes that any graduate could do!

    That Lord preaches like he's about 20, but really he hasnt even done his GCSEs yet.
    so anyone who hasn't done gcses can't give advice? riiight.... and all the jobs he stated are perfectly possible for someone with a classics degree.... may i just ask - do you have a glass stomach? as it must be difficult for you to see to type with your head so far up your arse
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    (Original post by Unregistered)
    wto jobs could do if i took history or classics, french, biology and pe at a level and has any1 taken pe a level, if so wots it like?

    everone seems to have neglected the other career options you have. biology+pe = physiotherapy- always a job going in that field. frankly i think every alevel has equal value, i don't do pe but i know people who do and it should be respected just like classics maths english etc are. the people i know who do it don't find it hugely demanding, but then these are people who are academically very good anyway, even at the 'traditional' subjects they take.

    if you took history theres a possible gateway into law there, a lot of unis like to have that as a prefferred subject, well either that or politics. and french is a brilliant subject to take as an alevel- loads of unis operate placements abroad on many courses, and if you have the alevel in it, you'd be able to take part in that, which would be great work experience for whatever you choose to end uo doing.
 
 
 
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