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    (Original post by K-Roam)
    I'm not actually at University yet but when i do go, i thought i was going to study Psychology. I've since been told that about every other student in Britain is doing it and there will be no jobs at the end! Now i've read this and it's put me off even more! Should i just give up and find something else to study or is psychology actually worth it?
    Its really competitive , especially getting on a clinical course, the more graduate the more competitive it becomes.
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    (Original post by K-Roam)
    I'm not actually at University yet but when i do go, i thought i was going to study Psychology. I've since been told that about every other student in Britain is doing it and there will be no jobs at the end! Now i've read this and it's put me off even more! Should i just give up and find something else to study or is psychology actually worth it?
    Somehow I doubt that 50% of the UK's current undergrads are Psych undergrads. Yes, there are a lot of us, but definetly not that high.
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    (Original post by xhelen1989x)
    I really do enjoy it, but no one told me whilst I was applying that to actually become a psychologist and get onto a professional course after it is like 10 places for 500 applicants or something
    However luckily that fact is screamed everywhere across the information about clinical psychology on the internet; so in theory, no-one should need to have told you
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    (Original post by questionmark)
    I had these thoughts. And sad to say I do regret doing Psychology. However, in the 3rd year you get to choose your modules so it does improve. I just wish I knew I had to had a PHD in order to be psychologist before I took this degree.
    what do you mean 'i wish i knew i had to have a pHD?'.thanks
    quote me
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    (Original post by feed-me-shoes)
    what do you mean 'i wish i knew i had to have a pHD?'.thanks
    quote me
    You need further qualifications/a lot of experience to be classed as a 'chartered psychologist'
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    (Original post by xKTx)
    You need further qualifications/a lot of experience to be classed as a 'chartered psychologist'

    What's the standard pathway to becoming a chartered Psychologist? If there is a standard? Or one way in become a chartered Psychologist?

    And do you really need experience or just the qualifications?

    If you need experience as well, how many experience do you need/
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    (Original post by KadeK)
    What's the standard pathway to becoming a chartered Psychologist? If there is a standard? Or one way in become a chartered Psychologist?

    And do you really need experience or just the qualifications?

    If you need experience as well, how many experience do you need/
    It depends on what kind of Psychologist you want to be; i.e. Clinical, Educational, Forensic, Occupational etc etc.. Take a look at:
    http://www.bps.org.uk/careers/what-d...areas_home.cfm

    Generally, it consists of Undergrad (3yrs) + a lot of work experience (few years possibly) + doctorate (3 years).
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    I was thinking of doing an undergraduate degree, MSc, then a doctorate.

    And within that gain sufficient experience.
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    (Original post by KadeK)
    I was thinking of doing an undergraduate degree, MSc, then a doctorate.

    And within that gain sufficient experience.
    Easier said than done :p:
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    (Original post by GodspeedGehenna)
    Easier said than done :p:
    She could always save up, grow old and then apply for the Counselling Psych Doctorate.
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    (Original post by GodspeedGehenna)
    Easier said than done :p:

    But define "sufficient experience"? Two years? three years? Four?
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    (Original post by KadeK)
    But define "sufficient experience"? Two years? three years? Four?
    Its not necessarily a case of time, its also relevancy.
    If you are doing something not entierly relevant then obviosuly its going to take longer. As was mentioned, its alot easier said then done getting appropriate experience.

    I know someone who graduated with a good 2.1 from a top 10 university 3 years ago and is still having trouble securing relevant placements in the clinical field (which is what she wants to pursue)

    I think officially is either 1/2 years minimum for a clinical docterate, but sometimes it takes considerably longer.
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    (Original post by timetokill)
    Its not necessarily a case of time, its also relevancy.
    If you are doing something not entierly relevant then obviosuly its going to take longer. As was mentioned, its alot easier said then done getting appropriate experience.

    I know someone who graduated with a good 2.1 from a top 10 university 3 years ago and is still having trouble securing relevant placements in the clinical field (which is what she wants to pursue)

    I think officially is either 1/2 years minimum for a clinical docterate, but sometimes it takes considerably longer.
    Try 3 years. Or 4-5 in some places part time where if you're not learning or on placement you're working for the NHS.
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    (Original post by smellslikemarmite)
    Try 3 years. Or 4-5 in some places part time where if you're not learning or on placement you're working for the NHS.
    We got handouts in my clincal psych lectures that said 1-2 years is the minimum that would be considered.
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    Im finding it all so boring...! On the surface, the topics seem so interesting, but psychology has a habit of nit-picking (is that a word??) at everything - being too analytical about everything that It just takes the interest out of it all!
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    I don't blame most of you.

    I had lots of doubts back when I was studying undergraduate psychology. I found bachelors was pitched at a very basic level, I could get 2:1s without even trying and 1sts in essays if you put a bit of extra work in. The theories seemed fairly far fetched, and quite abstract to the real world. Much of the work we covered wasn't really that interesting.

    I spent most of my time doing wider reading, and during those three years I probably spent more time reading English lit, philosophy from the undergrads and doing drama.

    For me it really didn't come alive until I did my Phd. Then it got good. I picked up a fantastic appreciation of the scientific method, epistemology, research methods. I learned to use MRI scanners, interpret neural function, brain structure, administer and interpret neuropsychological tests. I published my findings, became a peer reviewer, gave lectures. More imporantly I felt I had actually learned something that gave me some expert knowledge and mastery over a given area.

    Then I did my clinical training and it went from something that was "quite cool" to being something that radically changed the way I thought about things. I can honestly say it was one of the most amazing things I have ever done. It went from being very intellectually driven, to being very personal, about bringing something from within yourself to make a difference in someone else's life.

    I guess what I am trying to say is that your undergraduate days are really not representative of what psychology can offer. Psychology is definitely not for everyone, but it is far more than what you are force-fed at BSc.
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    Currently third year psych student on placement in neuropsychiatry. Absolutely loving it problem is that I find what psychologists do is not as exciting or as hands on as the doctors. The way I see it as a psychologist your limited to cog tests,basic patient assessments,talking therapies and research. Only the research and therapies interest me, cog testing gets so repetative, are slow to administer and can be extremely painful with some.

    I now have my eyes fixed on studying medicine as it's what I personally would enjoy more.

    The psych course itself is not representative of what is involved in the field, until you experience it you won't know what's really involved.
    In regards to becoming a clincal psych, people just say you need experience but the fact is it's so competative to get onto a doctorate course you will be applying again and again every year in some cases. From what I have been told the best chances to get onto a course is by doing a phd.
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    (Original post by Jimbu)
    Currently third year psych student on placement in neuropsychiatry.
    Out of curiosity; are you paid for your year's placement?
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    (Original post by GodspeedGehenna)
    Out of curiosity; are you paid for your year's placement?
    No, I think it's quite rare to find a placement in clinical settings that will pay you. The majority are volunteer, you might get a little compensation on research placements but otherwise no. You do however have access to free nhs training courses for extra skill which is great.
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    Would anyone who is doing a psychology degree/has done one think its more competitive than medicine?
 
 
 
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