To all the non-EMAers Watch

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laurenlodge
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#21
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#21
(Original post by orionmoo)
EMA. A grant of (upto-) £30 a week from the government to support your studies in college or further training (even if that may go towards booze).

Non-EMA people just see it as "free money" and they claim that their parents do not give them £30/week. In CASH, that may be so, but what non-EMA people fail to notice is all those goodies that their parents buy them. New clothes, all their college stuff, car insurance, booze, a car, big birthday parties, expensive 2 week holidays/cruises to the Caribbean.They always forget those things and just see it is, you get £30 a week for nothing. I don't. -is jealous-.

Perhaps you non-EMA-ers should just stop and think for a second. What do your parents get you. I know for certain that my friends who don't receive EMA all go on big holidays, they get a car and insurance and driving lessons paid for them from their parents, if they lose their bus pass or their coat gets ripped or something, their parents will go out that night with them/the next day and buy them a new £50 coat (and I don't live in s posh southern city either - I live near liverpool!) I receive £30 EMA and I need it. It paid for my driving lessons last year, it pays for my lunch in college, all the folders, pens (which run out VERY quickly and cost a fiver for 3! [those gel impact ones from partners/rymans]). When do I get new clothes? In the summer, and one coat at Christmas in winter. If I lose it or ruin it, I have to go with my thin hoodies - very cold! My family had over £6k in Halifax shares; worth about £200 now. All savings gone down the drain. What about your families? Each parent earns about £25-30,000? Big house? I thought so.

Those are just the tips of the iceberg of what non-EMA-ers forget about. So next time you criticise us for getting free money because our parents aren't as well off as yours even if you don't receive £30 in cash each week, just think how much you get each week in sundries.
All the stuff I've highlighted in bold I pay for MYSELF. Without EMA.
That's car stuff (I'm about to start), stationary, clothes, bus travel, etc etc.
So maybe you should just stop and think for a second before making stupid generalisations.
Oh, and buy cheaper pens if you're going to moan about them.
This sounds like a "poor me" sympathy thread, if you ask me, and I really don't take kindly to people who feel sorry for themselves all the time.
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ToryGirl
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#22
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#22
I don't think I have ever read such rubbish. I don't get EMA, and my mum (a single parent who earns enough to not entitle me to any EMA and works extremely hard in the NHS for it) and I don't get any money from my mum for college, clothes etc. I have to pay for it all myself as she cant afford to-ie. she has to pay for the house etc, and so I have to have a job to pay for everything. I haven't even learnt to drive yet because I can't afford to. Yet my friends who get £30 a week, and arguably their families have much more disposable income than my mum, use their EMA for saving up for holidays, driving etc. and don't have to have a job to survive (it takes me nearly 2 months of wages just to pay for my annual bus pass to get to college). I think you should stop being so close minded!
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DisgruntledMoth
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#23
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#23
By this logic, are people who don't get EMA and don't get anything from their parents or even live in a nice house allowed to complain?

The assumption is on par with the assumption that every EMA-getter spends it on alcohol.

In short, everyone just shut the **** up about ******* EMA.
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Zoe1986
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#24
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#24
LOL, when I was at 6th Form EMA didn't even exist so count yourselves lucky!
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paperclip
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#25
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#25
I wouldn't've been able to afford to stay in college without ema
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emily24316329
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#26
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#26
I wouldn't agree with what you have said under normal circumstances but even if i did don't you think the situation has changed slightly though what with the current economic climate i mean many 'non EMAers' like myself aren't as well off as you think before the recession but now are worse off...
Dad works for a bank and his wages decreased etc and savings have also.
I mean since I got my cash machine card I have had to pay for stuff and so now have a part time job to pay for driving and insurance on my dad's car etc so never did get too many extras from my parents anyway
now we are really economising due to risk of him losing his job etc...
so people who get EMA aren't the only people who aren't getting too many extras etc from parents....
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chairboy1
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#27
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#27
that post was complete and utter ********, out of the people i know on EMA, 4 are atleast twice as rich as me, 3 richer, 2 same, only 1 poorer, i don't get £30 from parents for ****

i have to work myself to earn cash to go out, if i don't work, i don't go out, simple really, it's just free cash for 80% of the people who are on it
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halbeth
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#28
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#28
(Original post by orionmoo)
EMA. A grant of (upto-) £30 a week from the government to support your studies in college or further training (even if that may go towards booze).

Non-EMA people just see it as "free money" and they claim that their parents do not give them £30/week. In CASH, that may be so, but what non-EMA people fail to notice is all those goodies that their parents buy them. New clothes, all their college stuff, car insurance, booze, a car, big birthday parties, expensive 2 week holidays/cruises to the Caribbean.
They always forget those things and just see it is, you get £30 a week for nothing. I don't. -is jealous-.

Perhaps you non-EMA-ers should just stop and think for a second. What do your parents get you. I know for certain that my friends who don't receive EMA all go on big holidays, they get a car and insurance and driving lessons paid for them from their parents, if they lose their bus pass or their coat gets ripped or something, their parents will go out that night with them/the next day and buy them a new £50 coat (and I don't live in s posh southern city either - I live near liverpool!) I receive £30 EMA and I need it. It paid for my driving lessons last year, it pays for my lunch in college, all the folders, pens (which run out VERY quickly and cost a fiver for 3! [those gel impact ones from partners/rymans]). When do I get new clothes? In the summer, and one coat at Christmas in winter. If I lose it or ruin it, I have to go with my thin hoodies - very cold! My family had over £6k in Halifax shares; worth about £200 now. All savings gone down the drain. What about your families? Each parent earns about £25-30,000? Big house? I thought so.

Those are just the tips of the iceberg of what non-EMA-ers forget about. So next time you criticise us for getting free money because our parents aren't as well off as yours even if you don't receive £30 in cash each week, just think how much you get each week in sundries.
I don't get EMA and I pay for an awful lot of my stuff through my part-time job. Agreed, my parents will buy me things, and I'm not against EMA, but don't tar us all with the same brush. Especially as I see an awful lot of people use their EMA for nothing more than the stuff I'd get through money I earn with a part-time job.
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Cowtipper
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#29
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#29
I don't get EMA. My parents could afford to give me £30 a week, but they do not. I would never expect them to do so, because I am capable of funding my own ventures, not being a lazy, tax-dodging *******.
When I was in college, the people who received EMA were almost without question completely uninterested in education. They were there for the money and so would disrupt the class as a way to entertain themselves, subsquently lowering the standard for the rest of us.
The ones who did not feel the need to disrupt us used their EMA money to get drunk every night and quite often fell asleep in class.

Go sponge off the state some more.
thejadedwords
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#30
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#30
You get free pens in banks.
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Jacinta
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#31
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#31
Uhmmm excuse me, but a 30 grand a year job (the benchmark for EMA) doesn't buy you a nice 5 bedroom semi, flash car, carribean holidays and nice little sundries so you don't have to work for anything

I don't get EMA, but I'm not 'jealous' as I have a job!
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NiceWeatherForAirstrikes
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#32
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#32
To summarise, your thread is complete b******s. Congratulations.
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blue4euro
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#33
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#33
Thats rubbish what your saying, because my parents have worked in their lives and made a ok living and i mean OK, i shouldnt get EMA its stupid. My parents contribute to the government more than families who dont and they are the ones who get EMA, its basically just income support and the benefits the government give out but for teenagers. Its idiotic, people i know go to college just for the money yet they are in no way putting the same effort as me in, yet im the one who suffers? wrong i say, if it were me i would prefer them to scrap the whole thing and let those people who want to sponge that £30 a week of the government go and work in macdonalds for the rest of their lives, just let whats going to happen to happen.
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Samj91
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#34
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#34
This post irritates me.
I get no EMA. I go to college Monday to Friday, and work 6 hours a day at the weekend, to pay for clothes, college stuff, driving lessons, etc. I also live in a terraced house, and if I want to go abroad, I have to pay for it out of my wages.
Please don't stereotype, as I know there are many people in the same position as I am.
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Liquidus Zeromus
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#35
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#35
EMA is not always spent properly. We should offer all students up to the age of 19(inclusive) discount cards and cash vouchers, and also more heavily subsidised travel, instead of EMA. Discount cards and vouchers which can only be used at book stores, some media stores(some each week, more in a monthly bonus on condition of good attendance and behaviour), food outlets, and so on. Things we want students to have, not transferrable for alcohol spending except in supermarkets.
There should then be a better system to support all undergrad uni students, too, but with cash instead, as they can usually spend more responsibly.
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Lara C.
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#36
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#36
(Original post by Cowtipper)
When I was in college, the people who received EMA were almost without question completely uninterested in education. They were there for the money and so would disrupt the class as a way to entertain themselves, subsquently lowering the standard for the rest of us.
The ones who did not feel the need to disrupt us used their EMA money to get drunk every night and quite often fell asleep in class.

Go sponge off the state some more.
strange how all those EMA people behave in that manner, almost as if EMA were a sign on their heads telling to do act that way!
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Rock n Roll
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#37
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#37
(Original post by paperclip)
I wouldn't've been able to afford to stay in college without ema
Get a job? One day a week would cover it! I'm not saying you shouldn't claim ema but it really annoys me when people say they couldn't live without it when they just need to get off their arse!
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bean87
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#38
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#38
i took ALG (same as EMA but for 19+) because it was on offer. but im totally against it. its complete ********. i would be much happier if no-one had it

my cousin for example doesnt get EMA. but he doesnt get anything worth NEARLY £30 a week from his parents. they arent rich. he gets £20 a month allowance the poor kiddo
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daftndirekt
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#39
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#39
(Original post by orionmoo)
EMA. A grant of (upto-) £30 a week from the government to support your studies in college or further training (even if that may go towards booze).

Non-EMA people just see it as "free money" and they claim that their parents do not give them £30/week. In CASH, that may be so, but what non-EMA people fail to notice is all those goodies that their parents buy them. New clothes, all their college stuff, car insurance, booze, a car, big birthday parties, expensive 2 week holidays/cruises to the Caribbean.
They always forget those things and just see it is, you get £30 a week for nothing. I don't. -is jealous-.

Perhaps you non-EMA-ers should just stop and think for a second. What do your parents get you. I know for certain that my friends who don't receive EMA all go on big holidays, they get a car and insurance and driving lessons paid for them from their parents, if they lose their bus pass or their coat gets ripped or something, their parents will go out that night with them/the next day and buy them a new £50 coat (and I don't live in s posh southern city either - I live near liverpool!) I receive £30 EMA and I need it. It paid for my driving lessons last year, it pays for my lunch in college, all the folders, pens (which run out VERY quickly and cost a fiver for 3! [those gel impact ones from partners/rymans]). When do I get new clothes? In the summer, and one coat at Christmas in winter. If I lose it or ruin it, I have to go with my thin hoodies - very cold! My family had over £6k in Halifax shares; worth about £200 now. All savings gone down the drain. What about your families? Each parent earns about £25-30,000? Big house? I thought so.

Those are just the tips of the iceberg of what non-EMA-ers forget about. So next time you criticise us for getting free money because our parents aren't as well off as yours even if you don't receive £30 in cash each week, just think how much you get each week in sundries.
Roiiigghht- Where do I start?
My parents earn arounda bout 50k a year together and I get very little to nothing. Firstly I have not been on holiday to the Carribean PERIOD and have not been on holiday in the past 6 years. I have to pay for all of my clothes-even my underwear and socks with the money I earn with my job. I have to pay for all of my art supplies and stationary, which can get bloody expensive oh and I have been saving for the past two years with money off of my relatives and spare money from my part time job for a car and car insurance. My parents physically could not afford to pay for that. I also resent the fact that you think that just because my parents worked hard and actaully succeeded in life that I (a non-qualifying EMA'er) leach off of my parents and have a rich lifestyle where cars, alcohol, parties and holidays are all paid for.

Ohh and yes I do live in a large house but with that large house comes an incredibly large mortgage which takes up nearly all of my parents incomes. Final point is savings? What savings? my family doesn't have any money saved in somme bank account.

So before you start to generalise think you bitter pain in the arse.
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Annaconda
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#40
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#40
(Original post by orionmoo)
EMA. A grant of (upto-) £30 a week from the government to support your studies in college or further training (even if that may go towards booze).

Non-EMA people just see it as "free money" and they claim that their parents do not give them £30/week. In CASH, that may be so, but what non-EMA people fail to notice is all those goodies that their parents buy them. New clothes, all their college stuff, car insurance, booze, a car, big birthday parties, expensive 2 week holidays/cruises to the Caribbean.
They always forget those things and just see it is, you get £30 a week for nothing. I don't. -is jealous-.

Perhaps you non-EMA-ers should just stop and think for a second. What do your parents get you. I know for certain that my friends who don't receive EMA all go on big holidays, they get a car and insurance and driving lessons paid for them from their parents, if they lose their bus pass or their coat gets ripped or something, their parents will go out that night with them/the next day and buy them a new £50 coat (and I don't live in s posh southern city either - I live near liverpool!) I receive £30 EMA and I need it. It paid for my driving lessons last year, it pays for my lunch in college, all the folders, pens (which run out VERY quickly and cost a fiver for 3! [those gel impact ones from partners/rymans]). When do I get new clothes? In the summer, and one coat at Christmas in winter. If I lose it or ruin it, I have to go with my thin hoodies - very cold! My family had over £6k in Halifax shares; worth about £200 now. All savings gone down the drain. What about your families? Each parent earns about £25-30,000? Big house? I thought so.

Those are just the tips of the iceberg of what non-EMA-ers forget about. So next time you criticise us for getting free money because our parents aren't as well off as yours even if you don't receive £30 in cash each week, just think how much you get each week in sundries.
get better pens?
dont complain about spending £5 on pens that run out quickly when you can get long lasting pens free easily.
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