Turn on thread page Beta

Jobs & Their Salaries... watch

Announcements
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Kingbradley6)
    So I was just wondering what everyone's views our on this...

    1) How much does one have to earn before you consider what they earn as "decent" or "good"?

    2) How much does money matter to you in a job? Would you be happy if you got paid hardly anything but loved your job? Or would you be prepared to slug it out every day doing something you don't exactly like but you're earning relatively loads? Or do you like a balance, if so, define your "balance".

    3) Would you be prepared to do a longer degree or training if it meant you earnt more in the latter part of the job (age 40+)? Or earn more in the starting stages in life but have a lower cap on salary (i.e. the maximum salary is lower).

    4) Would you rather earn £40,000p/a and get married or earn £200,000 and never get married (NB: This doesn't mean you aren't happy, just you never get married)?

    5) What our your views, on my views: Is it worth doing a long, arduous degree that your best friend is doing just to earn lots in life and perhaps be with your best friend longer?

    I just want different opinions to see what the majority view is on the money matter.

    Thanks.
    1. £80,000+ :awesome:

    2. Money is important. I wouldn't love my job if I earned hardly anything, i'd just feel like what's the point? So i'm happy to have a hard job/longer hours for more pay.

    3. Yeah I don't care how long the degree is if it means a good paying job later on.

    4. £200 000 for sure, I can still be happy and have a family and partner but not be technically married.

    5. I wouldn't do a degree in a subject I hated just because my best friend was doing it.
    • CV Helper
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    CV Helper
    (Original post by dramaminedreams)
    You are forgetting that TSR comprises of more hard-working, grades orientated people.
    Unfortunately, grades won't earn you money. Neither does being hard-working and grades orientated mean that you're even aiming for a high-paid job...
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    1) About 20K. 30K with children.

    2) I don't mind if I don't get paid much, I want to enjoy my job though. And I need to be able to afford a house, a car and children.

    3) I wouldn't mind to study longer for more money in the long run.

    4) Married. It's very important to me.

    5) No. Doing something because someone else does it is always a bad idea. You can still be "with" your best friend even if you live apart from each other.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    Amazing how most people want a 50-100k+ salary. Here's the fact- 90% of people on TSR won't live to see a paycheck higher than £45000. It's utter nonsense to say "Oh, I won't be happy if I don't get 50k+" because YOU never will.

    Personally, I'd be happy with just enough money to pay the bills, put food on the table, save a bit and bit of luxury.

    It amazes me at the amount of idiots (in my school as well) who think that they'll be earning upwards of 100k. These people are utter dossers, and they think life will drop a nice big salary into their lap.
    Retards.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by la fille danse)
    Unfortunately, grades won't earn you money. Neither does being hard-working and grades orientated mean that you're even aiming for a high-paid job...
    OK, let me elaborate a bit... you get good grades by working hard, you get into a good university because of these grades. You work hard and graduate with a good degree. You use this good degree to get a good job that pays well. Now where exactly is the flaw? Also most people on TSR are much more ambitious than your average student (Have a look how many people on here want to do IB or go to Oxbridge... much higher than the natural average.)
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    1) I want to have a combined income of £100 k when I start having children. I see this as being 70k me and 30k my boyfriend. I don't think this is unrealistic as this is just a newly qualified actuary's salary. I would prefer my boyfriend to be earning more though so that I can work part time.

    2) Money doesn't matter that much to me but I do have expensive tastes! I would love to earn enough money to have one winter holiday and one summer holiday a year, 2 kids and to own my own house.

    3) I am doing 3 years of training after my degree. I am prepared to do it for a job I love.

    4) £40,000 and be married, I really want children and i want to be married first.

    5) I think you should do a degree for you, but I do think you should be a little career focused as well otherwise there's not much point in doing the degree.
    • CV Helper
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    CV Helper
    (Original post by dramaminedreams)
    OK, let me elaborate a bit... you get good grades by working hard, you get into a good university because of these grades. You work hard and graduate with a good degree. You use this good degree to get a good job that pays well. Now where exactly is the flaw? Also most people on TSR are much more ambitious than your average student (Have a look how many people on here want to do IB or go to Oxbridge... much higher than the natural average.)
    The flaw is that not all good jobs pay well. Good graduates do not necessarily aim to get the highest paid job they can. Most people aim to get a job in a field that interests them. High pay is a bonus.
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by la fille danse)
    90% of people in full-time employment who have been in the same job for more than a year earn less than £49,923 annually.
    75% of them earn less than £35,479.
    50% earn less than £25,123.

    People should keep realism in mind when determining their "expectations". Most people on TSR live in a dreamworld in these regards.
    Your stats are of course right and personally I would have said 25K is a 'good' salary.

    My starting salary was 28K with clear progression to 45K in 4-5 years.
    Thats my dreamworld :P
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by jaz_jaz)
    how the hell is 13-20 a good salary?
    it would be a struggle to live on that in london!
    I'm not planning to live in London so that's not an issue for me, if I was I would agree that it's not a good salary.
    As I said, I would only be happy with 13k for a couple of years as depending on circumstances I'd struggle to live on that anywhere in the country.
    Personally I could live on 18-20k (assuming prices don't rise too far above wages) and so to me that's a good salary.
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Rogue275)
    Personally I could live on 18-20k (assuming prices don't rise too far above wages) and so to me that's a good salary.
    But what would you live on when your 80?
    A good wage wouldn't leave you pennyless in old age.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Quady)
    But what would you live on when your 80?
    A good wage wouldn't leave you pennyless in old age.
    Well there's always the state pension so I wouldn't be penniless.
    With £18-20k I could save a lot towards my pension. I save about 50% of my wage now, which is only £5k-ish, but then I am still living at home. But with a joint income we could afford to rent or get a small place.
    I don't have a particularly expensive lifestyle.
    I realise there's also council tax and utility bills and everything else but my definition of a decent wage was one that you could live on. £18-20 might only give you a basic lifestyle but you could definitely live on it.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by la fille danse)
    The flaw is that not all good jobs pay well. Good graduates do not necessarily aim to get the highest paid job they can. Most people aim to get a job in a field that interests them. High pay is a bonus.
    I don't think that is completely true. I know I would be willing to compromise some interests for a much more money, and I am sure that is the case with many others. Also, the majority of the people on here are interested in subjects that will inevitably lead to high paying jobs if they are good at the subject, and the fact is that most people on here are very good (at least well above the national average) at their particular field of interest suggests that they will get good jobs.
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Rogue275)
    Well there's always the state pension so I wouldn't be penniless.
    With £18-20k I could save a lot towards my pension. I save about 50% of my wage now, which is only £5k-ish, but then I am still living at home. But with a joint income we could afford to rent or get a small place.
    I don't have a particularly expensive lifestyle.
    I realise there's also council tax and utility bills and everything else but my definition of a decent wage was one that you could live on. £18-20 might only give you a basic lifestyle but you could definitely live on it.
    I didn't suggest you couldn't live on 18-20k. You can live alright on 14K in Henley (I did) but you'd never get a house so living on 7k in retirement wouldn't be comfortable.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Quady)
    I didn't suggest you couldn't live on 18-20k. You can live alright on 14K in Henley (I did) but you'd never get a house so living on 7k in retirement wouldn't be comfortable.
    I could afford a house on £20k as long as it was only about £80,000 at most.
    Maybe I should be clearer. I think 18-20k is a decent wage if you can join it with someone elses which I have always planned on doing. If my boyfriend earns £20k too then we have £40k together and can definitely afford a house and save for better pensions too.
    Even if I was on my own I would save more than 7k for my retirement.
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Rogue275)
    Even if I was on my own I would save more than 7k for my retirement.
    That wasn't saving that was the state pension.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Quady)
    That wasn't saving that was the state pension.
    I know, I meant I would save for my own pension and so not have to live off the state pension.
    Offline

    8
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Kingbradley6)
    So I was just wondering what everyone's views our on this...

    1) How much does one have to earn before you consider what they earn as "decent" or "good"?

    2) How much does money matter to you in a job? Would you be happy if you got paid hardly anything but loved your job? Or would you be prepared to slug it out every day doing something you don't exactly like but you're earning relatively loads? Or do you like a balance, if so, define your "balance".

    3) Would you be prepared to do a longer degree or training if it meant you earnt more in the latter part of the job (age 40+)? Or earn more in the starting stages in life but have a lower cap on salary (i.e. the maximum salary is lower).

    4) Would you rather earn £40,000p/a and get married or earn £200,000 and never get married (NB: This doesn't mean you aren't happy, just you never get married)?

    5) What our your views, on my views: Is it worth doing a long, arduous degree that your best friend is doing just to earn lots in life and perhaps be with your best friend longer?

    I just want different opinions to see what the majority view is on the money matter.

    Thanks.
    Slightly random survery, but ok, here goes...
    1. Decent = 18K as a newly qualified graduate 30K later in life.
    Good = 24K+ as a newly qualified graduate, 45K+ later in life.

    2. I'd much rather have a job I love. Obviously you need money to survive, so I wouldn't work for, say, less than about £14K a year (maybe less if I was married and my partner had a decent wage.) But I don't see the point in doing a job where you dread going to work every day, just because it pays you £100K. I guess a balance would be nice, or finding a high-paying job that I loved doing!

    3. Yes, if I enjoyed the job. I would not, for example, have been suited to doing medicine or dentistry. If a masters would improve my wage earning later in life, and I thought I would enjoy it, I'd happily do one.

    4. Well if I could do the same amount of work/enjoy the jobs equally, I would go for the 200K and not being married (as I'd be happy to live with a long term partner.) I assume you're making the distinction between high-paying jobs that don't give you much time for a love life, and 'normal' jobs, in which case I'd probably go for the 'normal' job with a good work-life balance.

    5. NO. Do a degree you will enjoy, it doesn't matter whether or not it is vocational, there are plenty of job-paths that just want a 'graduate'. Doing something just for the money is a bad idea if you're going to hate it, and doing it to be with your best friend is, whilst a nice thought, unlikely to work out. People grow apart at uni, and you make lots of new friends. If you're that determined to stay with your friend, why not apply to the same uni, but for a course that you actually WANT to study.
 
 
 
Poll
Were you ever put in isolation at school?
Useful resources

Articles and guides:

Hands typing

Degrees without fees

Discover more about degree-level apprenticeships.

A-Z of careers Advice on choosing a careerHow to become an online tutorCV writing helpCovering letter helpInterview tips

Featured recruiter profiles:

CGI logo

CGI is open for applications

"Offering a range of apprentice and sponsored degree positions."

Deutsche Bank logo

Deutsche Bank is recruiting

"Thrive in an international banking environment"

ICAEW logo

Merck

"Merck is a global leader in specialized pharma & chemicals – join us!"

Army logo

The Army is recruiting now

"With hundreds of roles available, there’s more than one way to be the best."

Bianca Miller, runner-up on The Apprentice

Handle your digital footprint

What would an employer find out about you on Google? Find out how to take control.

Quick links:

Unanswered career sector and employment threads

Groups associated with this forum:

View associated groups

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.