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    He's made changes, and some things that are quite difficult for the party's core support, but it's nothing in comparison to the Clause IV moments in the evolution of the Labour Party. He definitely represents a difference in style though.

    One of the interesting things is how Cameron has largely papered over the cracks in the Tory Party: he has basically ignored some of the traditionally divisive issues in the party, and people have kept relatively quiet on this issues simply out of a general sense of optimism and a willingness to get into government. As such, I reckon a good victory in a general election would be a pyrrhic victory for Cameron: once the party gets comfortable, he'll probably get torn apart.
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    I agree on the papering over the cracks thing. If I were a Tory, I'd be really worried if a Euro-debate starts up again. With Clarke back on the front bench, and the traditional small business Tories becoming increasingly ****** by currency fluctuations, there's going to be a sizeable number of pro-Euro Tories - certainly enough to cause an unpleasant looking public spat if the party's forced to debate the issue.
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    He declared an end to Thatcherism, how is that not comparable with the scrapping of C4?
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    (Original post by Tory Dan)
    Well that is his job as leader of Her Majesty's Official Opposition.
    The job of the opposition is not to flap their mouth with pointless criticism but to provide an alternative. Has he provided any realistic alternatives, for example, in dealing with the so-called "credit crunch"?
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    (Original post by ForeverIsMyName)
    He declared an end to Thatcherism, how is that not comparable with the scrapping of C4?
    Thatcherite policies worked, which is why no major party wants to wholly reverse them. Her remit was to reverese the UK's relative economic decline, and i would say it's been accomplished.

    As for Cameron, well I'd like to see from him a more cohesive economic policy. He should be saying how New Labour went wrong under Blair and Brown, how to get the UK out of the recession, and how to manage the UK economy after the recession ends.

    Judging by his actions in this recession, he would make a poor PM. IMO, part of being a leader is being authoritative and decisive, and he has not been in this recession. A leader should bring forth confidence, and he hasn't at all shown that thus far.
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    I do have some doubts about him. He's moved the party 'slightly' to the left which hasn't really bugged me. The backbenchers are behind him in public, but no doubt they are weary. But if he becomes PM I honestly believe he will grow into a strong leader.
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    (Original post by Simmons1234)
    As Barack Obama rightfully said, David Cameron is a lightweight. He's a shamelessly opportunistic, populist, inexperienced and out of touch politician. It's a real shame that he will probably be appointed to Number 10 in just over a year.
    Where did he say this?

    I need a manuscript as this will piss off my tory friend,who I always argue with.
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    (Original post by rajandkwameali)
    Thatcherite policies worked, which is why no major party wants to wholly reverse them. Her remit was to reverese the UK's relative economic decline, and i would say it's been accomplished.
    True, but people want public services now. It's electoral suicide to maintain that public services didn't need more funding than Thatcher gave then, hence the reason that Cameron has promised no tax cuts and a committment to public services at the level that they are provided now.
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    (Original post by Alasdair)
    No doubt about it. There's been a boundary re-draw that gives the Tories Kenilworth and Southam as a safe seat, and it's increased his notional majority by around ~5000. Your numpty Chris White will have to wait some time before he gets to take his seat in parliament, and thank god for it, he's a prime eejit.
    sorry to disappiont you but I live about 2 miles north of the new NLS building and will have Jeremy Wright as my MP.
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    (Original post by meenu89)
    sorry to disappiont you but I live about 2 miles north of the new NLS building and will have Jeremy Wright as my MP.
    He's a numpty and all - he once opined that widening University participation was a good thing because it allows the lower classes to mix with their betters...
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    (Original post by Alasdair)
    He's a numpty and all - he once opined that widening University participation was a good thing because it allows the lower classes to mix with their betters...

    just glad to have a Tory MP after 12 years tbh
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    (Original post by meenu89)
    just glad to have a Tory MP after 12 years tbh
    Was Andy King a bad MP then?
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    (Original post by Alasdair)
    Was Andy King a bad MP then?
    he wasn't my MP. I live the bit of the current Leamington constitutency that will be part of Kenilworth and Southam come 2010
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    (Original post by meenu89)
    he wasn't my MP. I live the bit of the current Leamington constitutency that will be part of Kenilworth and Southam come 2010
    Ah, right, I see. And was James Plaskitt particularly unpleasant about one of your constituency issues was he?
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    (Original post by numb3rb0y)
    How exactly can one be both populist and out of touch at the same time?
    I think it's imaginable - basing policy upon what you think people want to hear. A populist method, so to speak, without accurate data for him to act upon.
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    (Original post by Alasdair)
    Ah, right, I see. And was James Plaskitt particularly unpleasant about one of your constituency issues was he?

    don't think Dad forgave him for getting rid of Sir Dudley Smith, him and Dad been friends for ages. Plaskitt didn't know about Countryside issues mainly. e.g hunting ban and other stuff
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    I'd be far more worried if Cameron DID reveal his policies - that would be the political equivalent of shooting yourself in the foot. If he reveals his policies too soon before an election, it gives Labour the chance to attack them (because there is never a 'correct' policy, only what one perceives to be 'correct').

    He often cries for an election, and I can see why. I am not DC's biggest supporter, and he has failed to really make the most of the disastrous Brown era; however, all policies will be revealed, when it is too late for Brown to do much about it.

    His job is to oppose, not propose.
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    (Original post by Sammyted1)
    I'd be far more worried if Cameron DID reveal his policies - that would be the political equivalent of shooting yourself in the foot. If he reveals his policies too soon before an election, it gives Labour the chance to attack them (because there is never a 'correct' policy, only what one perceives to be 'correct').

    He often cries for an election, and I can see why. I am not DC's biggest supporter, and he has failed to really make the most of the disastrous Brown era; however, all policies will be revealed, when it is too late for Brown to do much about it.

    His job is to oppose, not propose.
    You can't possibly oppose properly without proposing things. And realistically Cameron's Conservatives have put forward quite a lot. If one is worried about their policies being attacked by the other party, I wonder whether they are solid policies!
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    It is not a case of one being worried about the policies themselves, but as you say, being worried that they would be attacked, whether for right or for wrong - there are two sides to every policy. The point of opposition is to highlight the government's weaknesses, as they are in power, ultimately. The last thing the Conservatives want to do is feed the Labour Party with early policies - the worst attack then is the label of the "do nothing" party, which has been overused by Brown and is rather flimsy.
 
 
 
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