Turn on thread page Beta
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    But... but... cats are awesome :/ Seriously though, it's good that you've had that moment of ultimate crystalising clarity :yep:

    There are amazing aspects to both careers, it's what each individual makes of it imo. At a mixed practice I worked at, there was this Australian vet that just worked in different countries every 6 months, and got to see the world and be a vet. And both degrees can earn you a place into research, which am considering at the moment, but who knows :dontknow:

    It's an all-you-can-eat buffet so stuff your face ;D
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    I don't think you can possibly compare the two degrees in terms of which is of greater value to society. The veterinary and medical professions go hand in hand to safeguard public health. It is the vets who are at the front line to monitor food-borne disease in abattoirs and it will be the vets who first go out to investigate cases of possibly zoonotic diseases in animals. Veterinary parasitologists help to research vector borne diseases and in many of our lectures we have been made very aware of the human implications of many parasitic diseases both worldwide and within the UK. Also, the study of animal infectious diseases may shed light on similiar human diseases. A large percentage of human infectious diseases are infact zoonotic so you can't ignore the fact that the two professions should be in communication.

    Then you have to consider how a veterinary degree can be used to directly help people. For example, charities such as the Brooke send out vets to foreign countries to treat working animals which can then go on to lead healthier more productive lives which has a positive knock-on effect on the community as a whole. A doctor can treat the sick people in the community which is obviously the most important thing but the working animals form the backbone of the economy and a doctor can't treat them, can he/she?

    Of course, at the end of the day, medicine is devoted to safeguarding human health and human lives the same way the primary concern of a working vet should be to treat any animal in his or her care. That is not debatable but the two professions are supposed to be interlinked. We study two modules on public health this year which shows you that part of a vet's job is to be very aware of the safety of the populations' health. So I suppose it's all a matter of perspective really. If you are only interested in human health, good on you, become a doctor and you will help many people. However, don't write-off a vet as an "animal doctor"; they are so much more than that and as I progress in my degree, I'm becoming so much more aware of how important vets are to both animals and people.

    Anywayyy, that's just my opinion. I'm tired of people trying to say that our degree is less valuable because human life is more important. I think some people have this misconception that if you're a vet student you're probably an extreme animal rights activist.

    Can I just finish with saying that I am in no way criticising Shockley's post- I was just giving my opinion in response. Congratulations, Shockley, on your chosen vocation, it's really admirable and I wish you luck for your future .
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
Turn on thread page Beta
Updated: March 24, 2009

University open days

  • Brunel University London
    Postgraduate Open Evening Postgraduate
    Wed, 23 Jan '19
  • University of the West of England, Bristol
    Undergraduate Open Afternoon - Frenchay Campus Undergraduate
    Wed, 23 Jan '19
  • University of East London
    Postgraduate Open Evening Postgraduate
    Wed, 23 Jan '19
Poll
Are you chained to your phone?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.