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    (Original post by raspberryice)
    same question for you, how are you finding the maths in your course?
    I would say that for Oxford an A at A-level maths is essential. As for the few who get in without it I get the strong impression the tutors thought were capable of getting that, even if they didn't actually take the subject. You'll have no chance of following physical chemistry unless you are comfortable with calculus. My very first lecture there was the thermodynamics introduction, which assumes knowledge of differential equations. Quantum mechanics and statistical mechanics requires a bit beyond A-level maths. You'll also need to pick up matrices for the second and third year inorganic exams.

    A quarter of the first year is spent on plain maths. While this does start by covering some A-level maths, it's more geared at covering the material that's needed on top of that for the main course. There's also a maths exam at the end of first year which you have to pass to reach second year. That's the end of exams specifically on maths, but you'll need the knowledge for physical and inorganic for the rest of the course.

    I'm not sure how chemistry elsewhere compares in terms of maths content. I can't see how you could do any physical chemistry course without most of A-level maths, but maybe it would be covered at a slower pace, and without assuming so much mathss knowledge.
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    (Original post by MrCynical)
    I would say that for Oxford an A at A-level maths is essential. As for the few who get in without it I get the strong impression the tutors thought were capable of getting that, even if they didn't actually take the subject. You'll have no chance of following physical chemistry unless you are comfortable with calculus. My very first lecture there was the thermodynamics introduction, which assumes knowledge of differential equations. Quantum mechanics and statistical mechanics requires a bit beyond A-level maths. You'll also need to pick up matrices for the second and third year inorganic exams.

    A quarter of the first year is spent on plain maths. While this does start by covering some A-level maths, it's more geared at covering the material that's needed on top of that for the main course. There's also a maths exam at the end of first year which you have to pass to reach second year. That's the end of exams specifically on maths, but you'll need the knowledge for physical and inorganic for the rest of the course.

    I'm not sure how chemistry elsewhere compares in terms of maths content. I can't see how you could do any physical chemistry course without most of A-level maths, but maybe it would be covered at a slower pace, and without assuming so much mathss knowledge.
    Well, you don't really need to know about matrices for group theory - you can apply it perfectly happily without caring how it works, and they'll never ask anything that mathematical in Inorganic IA or IB.

    Anyway, soon there'll be a short second year maths course as well, and that'll just make things worse :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by MrCynical)
    I would say that for Oxford an A at A-level maths is essential. As for the few who get in without it I get the strong impression the tutors thought were capable of getting that, even if they didn't actually take the subject. You'll have no chance of following physical chemistry unless you are comfortable with calculus. My very first lecture there was the thermodynamics introduction, which assumes knowledge of differential equations. Quantum mechanics and statistical mechanics requires a bit beyond A-level maths. You'll also need to pick up matrices for the second and third year inorganic exams.

    A quarter of the first year is spent on plain maths. While this does start by covering some A-level maths, it's more geared at covering the material that's needed on top of that for the main course. There's also a maths exam at the end of first year which you have to pass to reach second year. That's the end of exams specifically on maths, but you'll need the knowledge for physical and inorganic for the rest of the course.

    I'm not sure how chemistry elsewhere compares in terms of maths content. I can't see how you could do any physical chemistry course without most of A-level maths, but maybe it would be covered at a slower pace, and without assuming so much mathss knowledge.
    thanks for that, but i'm certainly not looking at oxford! where did everyone get that idea??....well it is TSR isn't it :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by raspberryice)
    Well done, how are you finding the maths side of the course?
    I dont like maths so its not great. However I am managing to keep up ok with it and can understand most of it.
    At Reading you have to do a maths module in your first year if you dont have A-level maths which is designed to give you the maths which you will use in chemistry. This did help quite a lot and I have never regretted not taking A-level maths.
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    (Original post by Dstbgre)
    I dont like maths so its not great. However I am managing to keep up ok with it and can understand most of it.
    At Reading you have to do a maths module in your first year if you dont have A-level maths which is designed to give you the maths which you will use in chemistry. This did help quite a lot and I have never regretted not taking A-level maths.
    That s very interesting! I haven't heard anyone say that before..
 
 
 
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