Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I am having to move regardless, as my nearest providers are too far away...

    I think I'm applying to Durham, Sheffield and probably Shef Hallam or Manchester
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Are most people staying home to do their PGCEs? I'm wanting to move somewhere far away for a change but by the sounds of it most people are staying at home, am I missing something?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    It could be best to think about where you would like to work. If you get a job in your placement school etc. That, and saving so much money. I'd also say that it is important to have a support network around you as it's a tough year.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    I would like to be able to live at home but there is only one provider I could do that with realistically, unless I drove at least 2 hours everyday for another one. Trying not to get my hopes up too much but it would be great to save some money and probably be a lot less stressed!
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    I'm trying to get a place somewhere so that I could live at home, as I want to save money and not focus on moving out. The only place for this would be Edge Hill really, as even if I went to Man Met (which is quite close) I still think I'd have to move out, seeing as my placement could be anywhere around there and it would be a hectic commute.

    The only place I know for sure I'm applying for it Edge Hill. The other two are up in the air. I was thinking maybe Sheffield Hallam because I go to uni in Sheffield atm and so I know the city well if I need to move there, and the other is between Cumbria, Liverpool Hope and Schools Direct. I'd put SD down in an instant, but there is only one place available which makes me hesitant!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    The placement fields at universities are large, a lot larger than people think. I live in Leeds and want to do my PGCE at Manchester Met and Leeds is a pretty close area in the placement scheme of things.

    I'd rather have the ability to drive than have to move to my provider. I think it would save a lot of time and save me from having to get up ridiculously early and not get back until late because of the stupid routes transport methods take.
    I couldn't afford to both drive and live somewhere else, so it's either one or the other.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by neonlj)
    The placement fields at universities are large, a lot larger than people think. I live in Leeds and want to do my PGCE at Manchester Met and Leeds is a pretty close area in the placement scheme of things.

    I'd rather have the ability to drive than have to move to my provider. I think it would save a lot of time and save me from having to get up ridiculously early and not get back until late because of the stupid routes transport methods take.
    I couldn't afford to both drive and live somewhere else, so it's either one or the other.
    This worries me even more now. I'm from Bradford and go to uni in Hull but I was considering moving down south to do my PGCE because the prospect of jobs seems much better down there. And I'd like to leave Yorkshire, do you think it will be difficult to move away so far to do a PGCE? :confused:
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Louzilla)
    This worries me even more now. I'm from Bradford and go to uni in Hull but I was considering moving down south to do my PGCE because the prospect of jobs seems much better down there. And I'd like to leave Yorkshire, do you think it will be difficult to move away so far to do a PGCE? :confused:
    I'm moving from Manchester to hull for my PGCE. Hull is great for teacher training because the closest other providers are York and Leeds. Therefore, jobs wise, you've got a big area with less competition (in terms of concentration anyway.)
    Moving down south would open up many doors, but you'd have to factor in higher costs of... Pretty much everything.
    Best of luck

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Hi everyone,
    I'm new to the thread and my decision to go into teaching is fairly recent, during my final year of uni. However, as it was my final year I didn't have time to research a lot and focused on my degree. I was hoping for some advice.

    I've been talking to a Headteacher for a primary school near me and it's likely that I will be getting some school experience starting in September. I haven't had any previous experience before and I am hoping to apply for a PGCE in Primary Education. I was wondering if I continuously volunteered 2/3 days a week starting from mid September, would this be enough?

    I have graduated with a 2.1 in Criminology, would this affect my applications? I have searched some institutions and they have said they want a degree in a 'relevant subject'. I'm getting pretty worried as I really feel like this is a good career option for myself and becoming a teacher is something I want.

    Thank you
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by AnuNaj)
    Hi everyone,
    I'm new to the thread and my decision to go into teaching is fairly recent, during my final year of uni. However, as it was my final year I didn't have time to research a lot and focused on my degree. I was hoping for some advice.

    I've been talking to a Headteacher for a primary school near me and it's likely that I will be getting some school experience starting in September. I haven't had any previous experience before and I am hoping to apply for a PGCE in Primary Education. I was wondering if I continuously volunteered 2/3 days a week starting from mid September, would this be enough?

    I have graduated with a 2.1 in Criminology, would this affect my applications? I have searched some institutions and they have said they want a degree in a 'relevant subject'. I'm getting pretty worried as I really feel like this is a good career option for myself and becoming a teacher is something I want.

    Thank you
    You should have two weeks experience by November if you do that, so it should be fine. The most important thing is what you draw from your experiences and how you communicate that in your PS/interview.
    Normally, they expect you to show some sort of relevant to the national curriculum with your degree. Did you do any modules to do with children? Anything maths/history/geography/etc related? Try to link it if you can.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Shelly_x)
    You should have two weeks experience by November if you do that, so it should be fine. The most important thing is what you draw from your experiences and how you communicate that in your PS/interview.
    Normally, they expect you to show some sort of relevant to the national curriculum with your degree. Did you do any modules to do with children? Anything maths/history/geography/etc related? Try to link it if you can.
    That's good then.
    Well I've done a fair bit of sociology in my degree...which I'm not sure counts as a national curriculum subject. I've done children and the law (family law) and my degree has focused around youth (and my dissertation).
    I spoke to the Teaching Line and they have said some course requirements may change...how should I be prepared at the moment?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by AnuNaj)
    That's good then.
    Well I've done a fair bit of sociology in my degree...which I'm not sure counts as a national curriculum subject. I've done children and the law (family law) and my degree has focused around youth (and my dissertation).
    I spoke to the Teaching Line and they have said some course requirements may change...how should I be prepared at the moment?
    If things do change everyone else will be in the same boat as you. They can't expect people to jump through hoops when they haven't put them in place. Check and contact the providers you'd like to go with, as it is them who make the decisions.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I was wondering: if I got an offer and accepted, would I then be able to decide not to do a PGCE anymore or would me acceping be binding? Like, would I be forced to pay??
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by FrancescaDB)
    I was wondering: if I got an offer and accepted, would I then be able to decide not to do a PGCE anymore or would me acceping be binding? Like, would I be forced to pay??
    When you register for your course, that's when you have to pay, either through student finance or out of your own pocket

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Billton)
    When you register for your course, that's when you have to pay, either through student finance or out of your own pocket

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    So does that mean if I accepted I could still retire without paying? Sorry I'm a bit confused
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by FrancescaDB)
    So does that mean if I accepted I could still retire without paying? Sorry I'm a bit confused
    You only pay for the terms in which you are enrolled.

    So if you accepted but then decide to leave before the course starts, you won't be required to pay anything.

    I will say this though. These courses are competitive and a lot of people become broken-hearted not getting on, getting onto a courses is a multiple year process for some people and it can be a case of blood sweat and tears yet still no results.
    If you're not sure if you want to take that place before even applying, I'd do more in-schools experience. Someone may have really wanted that place you weren't sure about and not getting it could have caused a lot of heartache. If I was this person and found out that someone quit before they even started, it would be a huge kick in the balls to me as I'm sure it would be to others.

    Make sure you really want this place before applying. Save yourself the time and someone else the potential heartache.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by neonlj)
    You only pay for the terms in which you are enrolled.

    So if you accepted but then decide to leave before the course starts, you won't be required to pay anything.

    I will say this though. These courses are competitive and a lot of people become broken-hearted not getting on, getting onto a courses is a multiple year process for some people and it can be a case of blood sweat and tears yet still no results.
    If you're not sure if you want to take that place before even applying, I'd do more in-schools experience. Someone may have really wanted that place you weren't sure about and not getting it could have caused a lot of heartache. If I was this person and found out that someone quit before they even started, it would be a huge kick in the balls to me as I'm sure it would be to others.

    Make sure you really want this place before applying. Save yourself the time and someone else the potential heartache.
    Of course. You see, my problem is money not being unsure of what I want I will be working like crazy to save enough money to be able to pay accomodation and living in general but you never know...
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I was going to apply this year, however, due to there being only 2 universities near me who I can potentially apply to,I want to gather more experience working in schools and see if it's really for me. Most unis near me want a certain amount of experience in ks1 and ks2 and a national curriculum degree (which I don't have) so I'm going to give it another year....is this a wise choice? Will I be considered as a possible candidate if I wait another year? I'm graduating this November.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by FrancescaDB)
    Of course. You see, my problem is money not being unsure of what I want I will be working like crazy to save enough money to be able to pay accomodation and living in general but you never know...
    If you get a student overdraft for whilst you're on your course you will easily pay it off during your firs year in teaching.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    So I here the QTS study guides are very useful but do they bring an edition out every year, if so when will this years be released?
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Brexit voters: Do you stand by your vote?
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Write a reply...
    Reply
    Hide
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.