Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
x Turn on thread page Beta

What were your "wow we're poor" or "wow we are well off" moments when you were a kid? watch

    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by SophieSmall)
    Can't really say the same about ours we moved house because we couldn't afford the heating and there were MAJOR mold problems on the walls and coming up through the floors. Moved to the new house and for the first while it seemed better as heating bills went down (could still barely afford it but could put it on maybe an hour a day in winter) but then our new house started to bleed mold, so much stuff got ruined. A lot of council houses just seem to be in disrepair and landlords basically told us there is sod all they can do about it. Doesn't help I have asthma so I get sick constantly in the wet months.
    Oh dear! See, we have the opposite situation (the inverse to what you just said). See, we live in a private rent house which has had hardly any repairs done to it (because our landlord is too greedy and useless to sign anything) and we have moldiness too. My sister is asthmatic so thanks to the mold in her bedroom, she's had 3 chest infections in about 3 months. My sister has not had it easy. Maybe she's not a child but it's a bit wrong when she has asthma problems and chest infections because of her bedroom, has an extractor fan nearly fall on her head and nearly have her sibling (me) become hospitalised by having our dining room door fall off its hinge a minute after I left the dining table. If I'd sat there an extra minute I'd be concussed. And it smashed a crack in the table (it's glass). We had no loft insulation, (that's one thing the landlord did repair), our main fuse box that powered the whole house didn't meet standard/legal requirements and didn't even have enough amps to work the shower, (power cuts!), there's the £60 a week thing I mentioned before and our house has been infested with ants and flies and it's been burgled (we live in a street with druggies too). Yet our landlord has the nerve to ask us to stay as tenants. **** him! He only wants our money.

    But the new house is more spacious, clean, adequate and nice, it's owned by the council, it's in a friendly neighbourhood (we've spoke to the neighbours already!), in a lower-crime-rate-area, and it's only an extra 14 miles to college by car anyway and the town centre is massive, laden with shops, has stuff going on and is nicer than here, so we're sorted. My (ex) bf is on about moving there too because he's from there and I was obviously excited, but we're not together anymore so I guess I'll just "see him around" and be cool-headed about it. Meh. But everything else is great! We'll be saving at least £100 a month, (and the rest), and we'll be safer and happier.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Rainbow Student)
    Oh dear! See, we have the opposite situation (the inverse to what you just said). See, we live in a private rent house which has had hardly any repairs done to it (because our landlord is too greedy and useless to sign anything) and we have moldiness too. My sister is asthmatic so thanks to the mold in her bedroom, she's had 3 chest infections in about 3 months. My sister has not had it easy. Maybe she's not a child but it's a bit wrong when she has asthma problems and chest infections because of her bedroom, has an extractor fan nearly fall on her head and nearly have her sibling (me) become hospitalised by having our dining room door fall off its hinge a minute after I left the dining table. If I'd sat there an extra minute I'd be concussed. And it smashed a crack in the table (it's glass). We had no loft insulation, (that's one thing the landlord did repair), our main fuse box that powered the whole house didn't meet standard/legal requirements and didn't even have enough amps to work the shower, (power cuts!), there's the £60 a week thing I mentioned before and our house has been infested with ants and flies and it's been burgled (we live in a street with druggies too). Yet our landlord has the nerve to ask us to stay as tenants. **** him! He only wants our money.

    But the new house is more spacious, clean, adequate and nice, it's owned by the council, it's in a friendly neighbourhood (we've spoke to the neighbours already!), in a lower-crime-rate-area, and it's only an extra 14 miles to college by car anyway and the town centre is massive, laden with shops, has stuff going on and is nicer than here, so we're sorted. My (ex) bf is on about moving there too because he's from there and I was obviously excited, but we're not together anymore so I guess I'll just "see him around" and be cool-headed about it. Meh. But everything else is great! We'll be saving at least £100 a month, (and the rest), and we'll be safer and happier.
    Well I'm glad it worked out for you.
    Offline

    4
    ReputationRep:
    I can't afford new shoes and saw my dad's bank account with 100 quid in. Never had a "we're well off moment", been poor since I was 14.
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by SophieSmall)
    Well I'm glad it worked out for you.
    Thanks
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Yakob)
    I can't afford new shoes and saw my dad's bank account with 100 quid in. Never had a "we're well off moment", been poor since I was 14.
    I'm sorry I know the feeling, we had some weeks where we had to choose between food and bills. It sucks.
    Offline

    4
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by SophieSmall)
    I'm sorry I know the feeling, we had some weeks where we had to choose between food and bills. It sucks.


    I remember I had a job as an apprentice, my sister asked me to buy her new tights as she was ashamed to ask our dad because we both knew he has no money.

    Plus my dad and mum asking their friends to borrow money to help fix the family car. My parents jobs literally depend on the family car.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Yakob)


    I remember I had a job as an apprentice, my sister asked me to buy her new tights as she was ashamed to ask our dad because we both knew he has no money.

    Plus my dad and mum asking their friends to borrow money to help fix the family car. My parents jobs literally depend on the family car.
    It's a tough world we live in not everyone can be well off
    Offline

    4
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by SophieSmall)
    It's a tough world we live in not everyone can be well off
    Its this country. I hate it, I question why so many foreigners come here or why even my mum came here.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    Eating bread and butter sandwiches for a good week because dads business was doing pretty badly, firms that owed money to him went bust.

    Realising this and feeling bad for not asking for anything since then, compiled with not being able to find any employment it meant I wore the same clothes for about 5 years, managed to afford a phone when I was 18 through saving up for a number of years, even then it was a crappy brick.

    Getting shouted at for not eating food as we couldn't enough food anyway.

    Eating two meals a day because that's all we could afford.

    Having never gone on holiday. A trip to the park was the closest we got to the holiday.

    Pound shop was the go to shop for EVERYTHING.

    In hindsight, it taught me a number of valuable lessons about life, financial management and being grateful what you have.


    Thankfully though parents are now doing very well financially as am I so money is not really an issue anymore.
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    Well apparently when I wad about 3 we went on holiday to center parks and after looking around the house or cabin or whatever I demanded to know where our pool was...
    I'd never been on a holiday anywhere which wasn't a villa with a private pool before that! What a spoilt little kid I was. My parents still find it hilarious now.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Yakob)
    Its this country. I hate it, I question why so many foreigners come here or why even my mum came here.
    Ehh I'm not even sure what I think about this country, but I'm glad we at least have the NHS
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by SophieSmall)
    For me there were a few things that made it plainly obvious we were struggling financially top ones would probably be.

    - When my mum had to work Christmas eve and Christmas day when we were kids because she couldn't afford not to take the shifts.

    -When my packed lunches were bread and butter (before they started offering us free school lunches).

    -Most of my clothes were second hand or hand me downs, own clothes days at school were just a recipe for bullying.

    -When a pack of biscuits or crisps was a major treat

    - the look of confusion and pity on friends faces when they asked me what I got for Christmas or birthdays, that one was probably one the worst.

    -hearing my mum cry at night on the phone about money, that's when I realised mainly and stopped asking for things.

    -never using the heating

    Despite all that I had a great childhood my mum always took great care of us and despite being poor we hardly ever felt it as children.
    Although my family definitely wouldn't be considered 'rich', we'd be considered 'well-off' as money has never really been a problem. I've always though myself really lucky in this sense and despite having the money to do stuff like go one holiday each year and I've always been extremely grateful
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    "Wow we're poor" realisation - getting something new and not second-hand is a moment to remember, hearing things about how it was growing up, like living in just a room with a mattress, depending on the hospitality of other people… however all I remember is a rosy, fun-filled childhood so no complaints

    This may be cheesy but from my experience it just goes to show money isn't everything, you can still be happy, but you always need some.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by pink pineapple)
    Although my family definitely wouldn't be considered 'rich', we'd be considered 'well-off' as money has never really been a problem. I've always though myself really lucky in this sense and despite having the money to do stuff like go one holiday each year and I've always been extremely grateful
    Appreciation is the most important thing
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by SophieSmall)
    For me there were a few things that made it plainly obvious we were struggling financially top ones would probably be.

    - When my mum had to work Christmas eve and Christmas day when we were kids because she couldn't afford not to take the shifts.

    -When my packed lunches were bread and butter (before they started offering us free school lunches).

    -Most of my clothes were second hand or hand me downs, own clothes days at school were just a recipe for bullying.

    -When a pack of biscuits or crisps was a major treat

    - the look of confusion and pity on friends faces when they asked me what I got for Christmas or birthdays, that one was probably one the worst.

    -hearing my mum cry at night on the phone about money, that's when I realised mainly and stopped asking for things.

    -never using the heating

    Despite all that I had a great childhood my mum always took great care of us and despite being poor we hardly ever felt it as children.
    Once I read your post I knew we were better orf!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    You know you've made it when you own a saloon car
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    I wouldn't say my family is rich, although that does seem to be the standard opener of rich families; but we are certainly comfortable, as in we were never wanting for food or other necessities. I always, well from a reasonably young age, knew I was in a well-off family but it was only aged fifteen that I really understood that I was well-off. My work experience (medicine) really rammed home just how lucky I was, and am, in my background.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    #RichLifeFTW
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I distinctly remember in primary school, having such poor lunches that one of my friends got concerned and brought me crisps- there were long periods of time where I had only one sandwich for lunch. I can't really think of anything else- got a slide up phone at 11, never been out of the UK or been on a plane, but I've been to Bath a few times to visit my Auntie.

    I also wasn't in the best school in yr 7/8 but thankfully was able to move to a great comprehensive the next town along, and I'm hopefully going to go to a awesome 6th form in September, so I count myself lucky. (I originally moved to Wales at 7 from England after my mum's job at a company went bust, although she's now got a really good job in the NHS now ) Other than that, I've got it better than many others, so I'm counting my blessings
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I wonder how many of the people that are slyly bragging about their families wealth are actually 'well off'. I mean, I know people who's parents scrub supermarket floors for a living and live in three story houses and drive Audis.

    Are you sure it isn't just the banker loaning them money that is well off? I'd define someone as "well off" if they own their house. If they have a mortgage I'd hardly call them 'well off'.
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
Turn on thread page Beta
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Updated: November 20, 2014
Poll
Are you going to a festival?
Useful resources
AtCTs

Ask the Community Team

Got a question about the site content or our moderation? Ask here.

Welcome Lounge

Welcome Lounge

We're a friendly bunch. Post here if you're new to TSR.

Groups associated with this forum:

View associated groups

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.