What's the essential piece of advice you'd give to someone starting their A-levels?

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    (Original post by AdeptDz)
    Thanks I'll keep that in mind


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    Good luck for the future.
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    (Original post by B_9710)
    Good luck for the future.
    Thanks, you too


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    (Original post by jaihooshmand)
    Working smart is more important than working hard.
    THIS. No point in doing endless hours of reading a textbook or completely filling revision cards and calling that 'revision'.
    Effective revision is the key, 1-2 hours of past paper questions and revision based around that, with short breaks in between are more efficient.

    It lets you be more relaxed with a-levels and not stress out as much as everyone else.
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    Make sure you understand as you go along and keep up to date instead of leaving everything to the last minute and waiting till revision time to understand what you were taught.
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    (Original post by The Empire Odyssey)
    I think the two main important things I would personally say is do not pick A-level subjects because you were good at them during your GCSEs. It will make no difference if you got an A* at Maths GCSE, but only pick A-level Maths 'cause you were simply "good at it". You need to enjoy the subject, to be able to appreciate and understand it. You will be more willing to learn about the subject if you genuinely enjoy it.

    Also, don't pick A-level subjects because you've been told by your parents it's a good A-level or because they want you to do a certain degree. Don't pick it because your teachers say "you'll be good at it" and do not pick a subject just because your friend will be doing it. These are all the wrong reasons for picking your A-level subjects.

    You need to really consider your future and whether the subjects you wish to study at A-level are needed for Higher Education or future employment. If you want to choose Pharmacology; then make sure you pick at least two sciences, etc. It's fun to pick subjects at the time when you enjoy them, but at the same time, you should start thinking about what career you'd want to go into and so forth.
    Couldn't have put it better myself!
    And the fact that although you're probably only taking 3 subjects at A2, it may seem like easy work but it's far from it! The amount of content you'll find is probably even more than quadruple the amount of content you'd get at GCSE - and 5 times harder!
    So although it is so much better studying 4x less subjects, you have to be committed and keep on top of it all
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    I beg of you. If you fail badly at something at AS despite GENUINLEY working hard at it DO NOT continue with it at A2. You wll be gutted and kick yourself for not continuing with the subjects you were good at to try and improve one you weren't so good at.
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    (Original post by AdeptDz)
    Maths, Further Mathematics, Economics and Biology


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    For maths and further maths examsolutions.co.uk is THE best website for maths revision it makes a lot of sense
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    I have three equally important pieces:

    1) Read
    2) Do the homework
    3) Don't forget to socialise
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    The best piece of advice I can give you is this: expect to do worse than you normally would have in the past! You're going to have to accept the straight Ds for a while until you can get used to the massive workload and harder content. But it's okay. Don't cry yourself to sleep because you got one bad mark. It will all turn out fine in the end! I went from an A star student at GCSE to practically failing but I just got my AS results and I've pulled it back up to A's.Also, actually do your homework. I made the mistake of pretending to do half of it and it doesn't work out well for you.And finally, my golden nugget of information for you newbies: it's not a competition!! For a long time, I put far too much pressure on myself to keep up with everyone else. Think of it like this: GCSEs might have been all about who can collect the most A stars, but A levels are all about you and your next step in life - all you have to do is get the grades YOU need for uni, nothing more than that. Don't think because you didn't get the same as your friend, that you're suddenly a failure.If you do all this, trust me, you'll be fine 😉
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    My advice:

    If you think that you will not do well in one of your options but are picking it because you 'like it' - drop it now. Do not take it. Seriously you will fail. (I did this for a subject and dropped it after 3 hours.)
    Pick subjects that your uni course requires. Please :/
    Don't pick essay subjects if you won't read the books...and also, English Literature is not that bad if you are able to interpret what you read in more ways that one (in case you were contemplating taking it)
    Make notes from before the lesson has begun. Trust me, I had done this for Sociology and then during the lessons I barely paid attention at all because it was just repetition of what I already know (Don't worry, I came out with an A for AS).
    Use your frees wisely. If you're like me and can't revise during frees that I have to be in school for, do homework during it or read examiner reports/look through past papers/make notes. I had done this towards the end of the year and saved all my revision for home where I work best and I had no homework or lack of notes in the way.
    Buy a **** tonne of notepads from now if you're doing essay subjects. No joke.
    You will hate your mocks but when exams come will be thankful for every single one.
    ALWAYS aim for an A. Never aim for anything less because if you aim for a B you will probably end up with a C etc. etc.

    Finally, don't be afraid to revise when nobody else is. This is one skill I had learnt towards the end of AS when I had revised during form time and had gotten so many looks and giggles as I was 'supposed to be relaxing' during that time. If you have nothing to do and feel mentally ready to learn/go over information - do it. It will benefit you and show in your results, I promise.
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    Make notes early! Revise from them so that you can condense them into four five pages for each exam, I found this extremely helpful this year.

    Also, try to review what you've learnt after each lesson to make sure you understand it

    One of the most important things I'd to listen to your teacher when they tell you to start revising in mid Feb/March, they know what they're talking about

    You don't need to be constantly revising from September to exam period because you're likely to tire out quickly and end up not properly revising

    If you find a subject more difficult then spend more time on it, but try not to neglect your other subjects (this is what I did and I managed to get an A in econ (which was my difficult subject) but only managed a B in Religious Studies, even though I was better at it
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    There's honestly no point doing more than 3 A-levels past AS.
    Even if you're interested in that many subjects, just learn it online for fun.
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    (Original post by ninjass)
    Ok here is my advice

    1) dont fall behind. It is very easy to do so and you dont want to add to your stress come exam period. Make sure if you miss a lesson you catch up.
    2) always keep ticking over with revisiom. For example you may learn unit 1 my december and then unit 2 after then. After december every now and then you should be ticking over unit 1 so its fresh in your mind. HOW MANY people telling me in april "oh i havemt touched unit 4 chem in 3 months i forgotnit all'. Make sure you are not one of them
    3) Long term plan should be made. This means that plan what you want done by next week maybe instead of wvery day. A good example is "my next week i want to be solid in the content of kinetics and nmr"
    4) be specifc in your targets. Its no good saying "ill do 2 hours of revisiom". What revsiom do you mean? A better mentality is "today ill attempt an m2 paper and do some polar equation questions from fp2" - this way you know exactly what you are doing
    5) know your progress for all modules. For example i was fine in every maths module and chem u4 bit was weak in chem u5 and econ u3 and u4. Therefore i knew i needed to work more in these modules.
    6) do harder questions and TOPIC question. This is important. How many times have you heard people say after an exam "oh that exam was so hard". You have to be prepared for worst case sceanario and harder questions helps your understanding. Topic questions are the boss as they help you know which topics you need to work on
    7) do stuff beyond the classroom. This is so important if you want an A*. The teavhers can only guide you and teach you the content but end of the day its up to you to take resposibility. So what if you havent been taught c4?why cant you learn it at home? This way its easier to get back to it when they teach it to you
    Thats all for now!!!
    Very good set of points, and I would recommend anybody who hasn't already read them. It surprised me how few people I saw in my school who did not do this. If I may add to some of the points:

    1) If you do find yourself falling behind, try not to panic, because (unless it is just before exams) there is usually time to catch up if you work hard enough and focus on the subject. Of course, do try not to fall behind, but panicking will only make it worse and it's all about knowing how much time you actually have and being able to manage it well.
    5) Specifications are your best friend. Go through the specifications even as you are first being taught the subject (and don't just use the half-specs the teachers give you where you have to either write a smiley face, a straight face, or a frowney face next to each part of the topic. They tell you to do it even before you have started covering it in class, so anybody who hasn't previously covered it at home is not going to have anything but frowney faces, and I just hate that because I don't think that's very good for learning...).
    6) Understand the topics. Again, they are not really going to ask anything outside of the specification, so if you understand all the topics in the specification then you should be able to answer the questions even if the question is approached from a direction you have not seen before. (That does not stop some exams being hard, but it makes you better able to handle the hard exams.)

    I can't believe how many times I have heard people saying things like 2) and 7). It should be obvious, especially at A level. It's YOUR life, YOUR grades, so YOU are the one who has to put the work in, in order for you to get where you want to go.

    Again, good list.
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    Always try your best and always seek help if you are unsure about anything or need help. Sort out your time management skill and it will help a lot in , supporting you to achieve the grades you want to achieve
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    Flashcards will become your best friend. Literally, as you're going to have no social life - at all.
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    Revise early, stay on top of work and if you miss a lesson make sure you get the work and do it straight away - do not leave until last minute. Don't let the stress become too much, reach out to friends/teachers and family if you feel you're struggling.
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    I haven't started A Levels yet but I have been told to pick the ones I know I will enjoy and that will help me into getting to do the course I want to at University!
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    (Original post by LenniesRabbit)
    My advice:

    If you think that you will not do well in one of your options but are picking it because you 'like it' - drop it now. Do not take it. Seriously you will fail. (I did this for a subject and dropped it after 3 hours.)
    Pick subjects that your uni course requires. Please :/
    Don't pick essay subjects if you won't read the books...and also, English Literature is not that bad if you are able to interpret what you read in more ways that one (in case you were contemplating taking it)
    Make notes from before the lesson has begun. Trust me, I had done this for Sociology and then during the lessons I barely paid attention at all because it was just repetition of what I already know (Don't worry, I came out with an A for AS).
    Use your frees wisely. If you're like me and can't revise during frees that I have to be in school for, do homework during it or read examiner reports/look through past papers/make notes. I had done this towards the end of the year and saved all my revision for home where I work best and I had no homework or lack of notes in the way.
    Buy a **** tonne of notepads from now if you're doing essay subjects. No joke.
    You will hate your mocks but when exams come will be thankful for every single one.
    ALWAYS aim for an A. Never aim for anything less because if you aim for a B you will probably end up with a C etc. etc.

    Finally, don't be afraid to revise when nobody else is. This is one skill I had learnt towards the end of AS when I had revised during form time and had gotten so many looks and giggles as I was 'supposed to be relaxing' during that time. If you have nothing to do and feel mentally ready to learn/go over information - do it. It will benefit you and show in your results, I promise.
    Great advice - I 100% agree especially when revising when nobody else does. You will be glad you did it come results day
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    (Original post by bioeng98)
    Very good set of points, and I would recommend anybody who hasn't already read them. It surprised me how few people I saw in my school who did not do this. If I may add to some of the points:

    1) If you do find yourself falling behind, try not to panic, because (unless it is just before exams) there is usually time to catch up if you work hard enough and focus on the subject. Of course, do try not to fall behind, but panicking will only make it worse and it's all about knowing how much time you actually have and being able to manage it well.
    5) Specifications are your best friend. Go through the specifications even as you are first being taught the subject (and don't just use the half-specs the teachers give you where you have to either write a smiley face, a straight face, or a frowney face next to each part of the topic. They tell you to do it even before you have started covering it in class, so anybody who hasn't previously covered it at home is not going to have anything but frowney faces, and I just hate that because I don't think that's very good for learning...).
    6) Understand the topics. Again, they are not really going to ask anything outside of the specification, so if you understand all the topics in the specification then you should be able to answer the questions even if the question is approached from a direction you have not seen before. (That does not stop some exams being hard, but it makes you better able to handle the hard exams.)

    I can't believe how many times I have heard people saying things like 2) and 7). It should be obvious, especially at A level. It's YOUR life, YOUR grades, so YOU are the one who has to put the work in, in order for you to get where you want to go.

    Again, good list.
    Thanks for adding my points - I agree with all the added suggestions )
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    Keep a decent balance, Don't study 24/7, you will get worn out and crumble. Take breaks to eat, and eat healthily. Go outside, meet up with friends. And don't mess up your sleep schedules.
 
 
 
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