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    (Original post by Saracen's Fez)
    What is going on in one industry is not a matter for the trade union representing an entirely different industry. Striking should fundamentally be to represent the interests of one's own profession, not to make a more general political point.
    Hear Hear
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    (Original post by Saracen's Fez)
    What is going on in one industry is not a matter for the trade union representing an entirely different industry. Striking should fundamentally be to represent the interests of one's own profession, not to make a more general political point.
    That is simply ludicrous. Having the right to secondary strikes give the unions essential bargaining power which is needed to help get a fair wage and tackle inequality. In the 1970s when union powers were at their height there was less inequality and this speaks for itself. I urge you to consider the fact that strikes arent a political action however an action to safeguard workers rights.
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    (Original post by Markt1998)
    That is simply ludicrous. Having the right to secondary strikes give the unions essential bargaining power which is needed to help get a fair wage and tackle inequality. In the 1970s when union powers were at their height there was less inequality and this speaks for itself. I urge you to consider the fact that strikes arent a political action however an action to safeguard workers rights.
    When the strike is unrelated to the industry, then it is a broader political action. Surely you don't seriously favour a return to 1970s levels of striking though?
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    (Original post by Saracen's Fez)
    When the strike is unrelated to the industry, then it is a broader political action. Surely you don't seriously favour a return to 1970s levels of striking though?
    Although i wouldnt like a return to the winter of discontent, i'd argue that unions should have the right to protect workers rights via action incorporating more than 1 sector both because of the precedent an unpopular decision being allowed to happen would set for all industries and because bargaining power must be as strong as possible to get a fair deal.
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    (Original post by Nigel Farage MEP)
    Solidarity, I would like to know if you support reverse solidarity; solidarity of employers, where one employer can spite its workers by disciplining them to show support for another employer, in another sector who is disciplining a worker for being under the influence on the job. As you support equality you should support this type of solidarity where the wrongdoing of one worker can lead to punishment of other workers in different sectors, but you do not which demonstrates you do not support equality, rather you support privilege but for the perceived proletariat; very hypocritical.
    Strikes are not, however, a means of disciplinary actions: they are collective action to negotiate for better terms of employment, which of course employers have the right to change already with very little in the way of restriction or regulation.
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    (Original post by Green_Pink)
    Strikes are not, however, a means of disciplinary actions: they are collective action to negotiate for better terms of employment, which of course employers have the right to change already with very little in the way of restriction or regulation.
    A strike can be compared to disciplinary action against the employer as the employer takes a dent in revenue, the employer takes a dent in productivity, and the employer may take a further dent if it meets the demands of the strikers. Strikes are always about a way to get back at an employer when the employer does something the workers do not support; it is a way of punishing the employer.
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    (Original post by Nigel Farage MEP)
    A strike can be compared to disciplinary action against the employer as the employer takes a dent in revenue, the employer takes a dent in productivity, and the employer may take a further dent if it meets the demands of the strikers. Strikes are always about a way to get back at an employer when the employer does something the workers do not support; it is a way of punishing the employer.
    Although strikes do have the side effect of punishing the employer the main objective is to secure the best deal for the workers and ensure their rights arent infringed. Disciplinary action however is solely a punishment.
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    (Original post by Nigel Farage MEP)
    A strike can be compared to disciplinary action against the employer as the employer takes a dent in revenue, the employer takes a dent in productivity, and the employer may take a further dent if it meets the demands of the strikers. Strikes are always about a way to get back at an employer when the employer does something the workers do not support; it is a way of punishing the employer.
    I would reject it's "punishment" simply because they aren't removing anything the employer was previously entitled to: notably, they aren't entitled to your labour in the first place, it is offered to them in exchange for financial compensation. It's a similar argument to saying that the Government is "punishing" benefit claimants by changing the terms of their benefits: it is only really punishment if something that you are entitled to in the first place is removed as a consequence of a breach of an implied or explicit contract.
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    (Original post by Green_Pink)
    I would reject it's "punishment" simply because they aren't removing anything the employer was previously entitled to: notably, they aren't entitled to your labour in the first place, it is offered to them in exchange for financial compensation. It's a similar argument to saying that the Government is "punishing" benefit claimants by changing the terms of their benefits: it is only really punishment if something that you are entitled to in the first place is removed as a consequence of a breach of an implied or explicit contract.
    I would define punishment as the purposeful infliction of a penalty in response to an action without entitlement being important. It would not be similar to saying the government is punishing benefit claimants because the government changes are in response to the national accounts, not an action of a claimant. The punishment argument can be set aside in favour of using damages, where the strikes cause damage to the employers and the employer changes cause damages to the workers. If a person is in favour of allowing other sectors to join in causing damage against an employer using the solidarity argument, the person must also support employers in other sectors to cause damage against their workers for no reasons other than solidarity.
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    I'd like to take this opportunity to pledge my support for solidarity... solidarity with all those humble workers just going about their day and faced with disruption due to a strike they didn't want and don't support.
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    I'd like to pledge my support for workers who take the difficult, unpopular decision to strike in support of fellow professionals, at the expense of their own pay, to continue the tradition that has brought the benefits current workers take for granted.
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    (Original post by Rakas21)
    I'd like to take this opportunity to pledge my support for solidarity... solidarity with all those humble workers just going about their day and faced with disruption due to a strike they didn't want and don't support.
    I feel sorry for all those people who are unfairly dismissed, who see the pay checks decrease, over time fall or working conditions decline because the employer took advantage of a workforce where strikes wouldn't exist. Where they suffer with no news coverage, so debate, no chance of rebuttals.
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    (Original post by Rakas21)
    I'd like to take this opportunity to pledge my support for solidarity... solidarity with all those humble workers just going about their day and faced with disruption due to a strike they didn't want and don't support.
    Continuing on from the multiverse conversation in the Bar, I pledge my support to those living in another universe where we have never had an organised and politicised labour movement to pressure us into such disastrous things as weekends, 8-hour days, and protections against unsafe working conditions - and those in other countries who still don't enjoy many of these rights.
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    Tory and damn right proud!
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    (Original post by jelmes96)
    Tory and damn right proud!
    Go to the Tory thread then.
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    (Original post by RayApparently)
    Go to the Tory thread then.
    why? quick question, when do you think Labour will next be in government? oh, also, why do you guys support Labour?
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    (Original post by jelmes96)
    why? quick question, when do you think Labour will next be in government? oh, also, why do you guys support Labour?
    Why? Because that wasn't a question for the TSR Labour Party or a request to join us (see thread title) it was a declaration of support for the Tories, I'm sure they'd love to hear it.

    That first question is tricky to answer without even knowing who the leader will be and therefore what kind of campaign the party will be running. Obviously as a Labourite I hope 2020.

    I support Labour because I believe in the values it was founded on and the values it stands for - ideas of tolerance, solidarity and equality. Its past achievements have been glorious (the NHS being the pinnacle but labour market reforms such as the minimum wage, democratic reforms with regards to the House of Lords and devolution for example also having a huge effect on our society) and I anticipate glorious things in its future. It remains the only party that can stand up against a callous and detached Conservative party on behalf of ordinary people and as long as it continues to make the arguments I believe in I'll remain loyal to it. I'll let my fellow TSR party members speak for themselves.
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    (Original post by RayApparently)
    Why? Because that wasn't a question for the TSR Labour Party or a request to join us (see thread title) it was a declaration of support for the Tories, I'm sure they'd love to hear it..
    We tend to prefer dignity in expression of support, not harassing other the threads of other parties, so I believe.
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    (Original post by thehistorybore)
    We tend to prefer dignity in expression of support, not harassing other the threads of other parties, so I believe.
    I assume there's a typo somewhere because I don't understand what you mean. Are you stating that you don't support harassment?
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    (Original post by RayApparently)
    I assume there's a typo somewhere because I don't understand what you mean. Are you stating that you don't support harassment?
    Sorry, not really sure what I'm saying. Celebrating exams ending, prime minister, so I barely know who I am.

    What I meant to say is, the Conservative Party does not support exclamations of support on the threads of other parties.
 
 
 
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