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    (Original post by Red Lightning)
    Do you guys reckon its a good idea writing a bit of reflection after each lesson I teach?
    We have to do this. There's a small space at the bottom of our lesson plans for an evaluation of our teaching and an evaluation of the children's learning. Plus a space for next steps. We've been told that just one or two bullet points each time will suffice, but it's good practice.


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    (Original post by Red Lightning)
    Do you guys reckon its a good idea writing a bit of reflection after each lesson I teach?
    If you really want to, write an official one for each official observed lesson because you can use these to evidence your standards later. So if you have to be officially observed twice a week then write one twice a week. However, for your other lessons just keep a little notebook to jot down things that didn't work so well or how you could improve for next time.
    Writing a reflection after each lesson is extremely time consuming and you'll find yourself a lot more stressed as it eats into time when you could be marking or doing lesson plans.
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    (Original post by Shelly_x)
    However, for your other lessons just keep a little notebook to jot down things that didn't work so well or how you could improve for next time.

    Thanks, I like the notebook idea.That way, I can easily I remember all the feedback I have been given.
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    I know it's a big topic to open up - but does anyone feel (going into secondary) that primary would have been better suited for them?

    Not saying it's 'easier' but for me at least a) subject knowledge isn't the strongest and I feel I have double the work learning stuff and planning, creating resources at the same time b) I've been in both environments and lower school children usually stop misbehaving at the most with a shout (though that's not even needed) but not for me specifically though with other teachers i've seen some have an attitude and try to humiliate the teacher - with some, if they hold a grudge that's it the teacher has had it.

    I have heard though that once you get QTS you can teach primary or any other subject for that matter - this is true right?
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    (Original post by Red Lightning)
    Do you guys reckon its a good idea writing a bit of reflection after each lesson I teach?
    I am only a TA, but applying for the PGCE, before this I worked at a children's centre.
    At the cc we had to reflect ALL the time. It was incredibly useful. I was shocked when starting in a school that there isn't always any team reflection (in early years we are all based at seperate locations etc).
    I personally have a notebook. I began writing in it like a diary but now it's just when I get chance....really need to increase it again. I write things that go well and those that don't and what I think should be changed.

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    (Original post by Sam89)
    I know it's a big topic to open up - but does anyone feel (going into secondary) that primary would have been better suited for them?

    Not saying it's 'easier' but for me at least a) subject knowledge isn't the strongest and I feel I have double the work learning stuff and planning, creating resources at the same time b) I've been in both environments and lower school children usually stop misbehaving at the most with a shout (though that's not even needed) but not for me specifically though with other teachers i've seen some have an attitude and try to humiliate the teacher - with some, if they hold a grudge that's it the teacher has had it.

    I have heard though that once you get QTS you can teach primary or any other subject for that matter - this is true right?
    Haha I'm a little worried about this. I have to do some primary experience soon and so far I'm loving the year 7 and 8s, so maybe I will prefer primary!

    You technically can teach primary with a secondary pgce but it's unlikely to happen. You've trained in a secondary school and there's loads of primary pgce students applying for those jobs. From the school point of view, there is little reason to hire us!

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    Taught my first solo lessons today...

    it didn't go bad, but it also didn't go well...

    I feel so out of my depth right now. I know it will get easier and I can't expect to be good when I've never taught anything before, but, I just feel so stressed and upset.

    I'm really struggling to plan lessons and for a particular lesson, there is nothing on TES :/
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    (Original post by Red Lightning)
    Thanks, I like the notebook idea.That way, I can easily I remember all the feedback I have been given.
    As well as making you a better teacher the reflection will help you with observations- it's easier to deal with criticism if you've already identified that area for improvement yourself I find!

    (Original post by Sam89)
    I know it's a big topic to open up - but does anyone feel (going into secondary) that primary would have been better suited for them?

    Not saying it's 'easier' but for me at least a) subject knowledge isn't the strongest and I feel I have double the work learning stuff and planning, creating resources at the same time b) I've been in both environments and lower school children usually stop misbehaving at the most with a shout (though that's not even needed) but not for me specifically though with other teachers i've seen some have an attitude and try to humiliate the teacher - with some, if they hold a grudge that's it the teacher has had it.

    I have heard though that once you get QTS you can teach primary or any other subject for that matter - this is true right?
    You can legally teach 3-18 with QTS. As already said it's obviously harder to get a job in a different age group to the one you initially trained for. They will want to know why you're switching, as well as seeing evidence you have the skills needed (if you really decide you'd prefer primary start collecting little bits of this). Things like pastoral work, coordinating everything for one child (IEPs, assessment in all subjects etc), working with the same children all the time, teaching things you know next to nothing about before research.

    It's not unheard of. I have met people who've gone both ways, though I think a lot also depends on lucky circumstances of finding the right post and school!

    Maybe starting with some outreach stuff with local primaries would be a good start, once you're qualified. Or maybe see if there's a summer opportunity in primary.

    xxx
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    (Original post by Mr CS)
    That's my first lesson done and dusted. Now to go plan a load more.
    First is definitely the hardest. I'm on my third today and it gets easier. Would help if I didn't see my mentor the day before though... he's in the habit of adding some sort of activity that requires lots of new resources for a ten minute activity.

    (Original post by Samus2)
    Taught my first solo lessons today...

    it didn't go bad, but it also didn't go well...

    I feel so out of my depth right now. I know it will get easier and I can't expect to be good when I've never taught anything before, but, I just feel so stressed and upset.

    I'm really struggling to plan lessons and for a particular lesson, there is nothing on TES :/
    You've done your first one and that is definitely the hardest one. There will still be difficult ones but nothing like that first time in the classroom. You've survived and you probably noted bits that need work but also things that went well.

    Focus on the positives and work on everything else bit by bit. You're a trainee at the very start of training, you aren't meant to be brilliant or even good yet!

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    So I'm into my 3rd week of placement.

    In the 2 weeks before half term we were observing lessons and getting used to the school. Since coming back I now have 2 classes that I have responsibility for and I'm really starting to feel the pressure. I know that 5 hours teaching a week is nothing compared to NQT etc. but I'm finding it really tough. My planning is slow because i am constantly striving for perfection whilst struggling with resources.

    I've also suffered from anxiety in the past and am relying more and more on beta blockers in the more difficult classes I observe in which is worrying me. But I'm not really sure what to do about it :/ or whether I should tell anyone or just get on with it...
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    Had another awful lesson today :awesome: . In fact, I've never had a good lesson. To be honest I'm feeling so negative about the whole thing now that I don't even care when I come out of a bad lesson. I'm used to it by now :lol: . Hmm.
    (Original post by GooglyEyedMonster)
    So I'm into my 3rd week of placement.

    In the 2 weeks before half term we were observing lessons and getting used to the school. Since coming back I now have 2 classes that I have responsibility for and I'm really starting to feel the pressure. I know that 5 hours teaching a week is nothing compared to NQT etc. but I'm finding it really tough. My planning is slow because i am constantly striving for perfection whilst struggling with resources.

    I've also suffered from anxiety in the past and am relying more and more on beta blockers in the more difficult classes I observe in which is worrying me. But I'm not really sure what to do about it :/ or whether I should tell anyone or just get on with it...
    Hey. I totally know how you feel. I have 7 hours a week (well will do when it builds up to it in a week or two), and it feels pathetic moaning about it considering it's such a small fraction of a real teaching timetable, but I guess it's all relative.

    I suffer from anxiety and depression and I am always wondering whether I should tell someone, but then I think, why? I don't really know what anyone would do about it apart from probably judge me or something (I don't care what people say, mental health is still stigmatised). I declared it on my occupational health but never told uni or school. I have weekly counselling sessions with the NHS which were only available in the daytime, so my mentor has let me go on a morning I don't have lessons, but gladly she's never asked what it's for, which I'm grateful about. I've never taken beta blockers. I have benzodiazepines but they are pretty extreme and also addictive so I can't take them often. Do you find the beta blockers help?
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    (Original post by GooglyEyedMonster)
    So I'm into my 3rd week of placement.

    In the 2 weeks before half term we were observing lessons and getting used to the school. Since coming back I now have 2 classes that I have responsibility for and I'm really starting to feel the pressure. I know that 5 hours teaching a week is nothing compared to NQT etc. but I'm finding it really tough. My planning is slow because i am constantly striving for perfection whilst struggling with resources.

    I've also suffered from anxiety in the past and am relying more and more on beta blockers in the more difficult classes I observe in which is worrying me. But I'm not really sure what to do about it :/ or whether I should tell anyone or just get on with it...

    (Original post by Airfairy)
    Had another awful lesson today :awesome: . In fact, I've never had a good lesson. To be honest I'm feeling so negative about the whole thing now that I don't even care when I come out of a bad lesson. I'm used to it by now :lol: . Hmm.


    Hey. I totally know how you feel. I have 7 hours a week (well will do when it builds up to it in a week or two), and it feels pathetic moaning about it considering it's such a small fraction of a real teaching timetable, but I guess it's all relative.

    I suffer from anxiety and depression and I am always wondering whether I should tell someone, but then I think, why? I don't really know what anyone would do about it apart from probably judge me or something (I don't care what people say, mental health is still stigmatised). I declared it on my occupational health but never told uni or school. I have weekly counselling sessions with the NHS which were only available in the daytime, so my mentor has let me go on a morning I don't have lessons, but gladly she's never asked what it's for, which I'm grateful about. I've never taken beta blockers. I have benzodiazepines but they are pretty extreme and also addictive so I can't take them often. Do you find the beta blockers help?

    It's really a very personal decision as to whether to tell the uni. In the situation I think I would have told my mentor because we got on very well and all my tutors were so supportive. I had a heart condition which, at the time, could have occurred during school. I was really worried they'd say I couldn't do stuff but actually it never even came up apart from when I needed time off which they were very supportive about. But it depends on your relationship with your tutors and how you feel personally about your health. Although they might not be able to support you more directly it could help if you feel they know a bit more about the issues you're facing so can be more understanding.

    I know exactly the feeling with the hours thing. I remember thinking "As a full tine teacher I will have to teach 5x this!!!" And thinking there aren't enough hours. It obviously is time consuming, but the extra teaching time is balanced with an increase in speed through getting more practice, having more ideas, having resources ready made, knowing children better etc. Plus having no assignments and less professional development to worry about helps it take a similar amount of time to now when you're fully fledged.

    Also, regarding observations- you do get more used to it as time passes. I was terrified when I started but you get a lot more confident. I can't speak from experience regarding anxiety but in general it does become a bit like second nature to have someone in with you. Plus it's better the more you get to know the observer.

    Xxx

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    First official lesson observation tomorrow - not too nervous yet but saying that, i probably won't sleep!
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    I had my first observation today. Obviously I had some areas of development but overall it went really well and my tutor was very impressed. Such a relief...I might be able to sleep tonight!!
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    My differentiation sucks. I asked another teacher in my department as she's teaching the same content to another group of year 7 students and she said she'd struggle to differentiate too.

    *grumbles*

    It's so hard working within the limits of a piece of software - there's only so much I can show the brilliant students without excluding the others or making it so that the smart ones have additional work. Surely additional work isn't a good thing and they're smart enough to realise that doing well = more work? And leveled worksheets won't work as if they steam ahead with the content, they'll have to go back to it when the others catch up anyway so that'll just lead to boredom
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    Yayy, my first observation went well!
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    (Original post by ParadoxSocks)
    My differentiation sucks. I asked another teacher in my department as she's teaching the same content to another group of year 7 students and she said she'd struggle to differentiate too.

    *grumbles*

    It's so hard working within the limits of a piece of software - there's only so much I can show the brilliant students without excluding the others or making it so that the smart ones have additional work. Surely additional work isn't a good thing and they're smart enough to realise that doing well = more work? And leveled worksheets won't work as if they steam ahead with the content, they'll have to go back to it when the others catch up anyway so that'll just lead to boredom
    How about setting separate tasks from the off? You could give an intro to the concepts then set tasks, then ask a group to stay with you to talk for longer and set them a different but related task. This could be a chance to explain more in depth concepts to your "haps" or a chance to go over something which a group needs more support on.

    Consider getting the pupils to self assess which task they need to do as well. After a little practice they are pretty good at it! Obviously some guidance is needed, especially at first or if you have a pupil with confidence issues. Use the ends of lessons at first to reflect on their choices.

    Then the final part of your lesson can involve sharing ideas about what they learnt or something related to the overall concept that they should all have learnt.

    Try not to think of it as a linear journey of learning 1, 2, 3, 4 with some pupils "further ahead". Think of it as you are teaching a topic and all pupils have different prior knowledge/skills so each of them is going to have a different outcome by the end of the topic.

    Xxx

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    (Original post by kpwxx)
    How about setting separate tasks from the off? You could give an intro to the concepts then set tasks, then ask a group to stay with you to talk for longer and set them a different but related task. This could be a chance to explain more in depth concepts to your "haps" or a chance to go over something which a group needs more support on.

    Consider getting the pupils to self assess which task they need to do as well. After a little practice they are pretty good at it! Obviously some guidance is needed, especially at first or if you have a pupil with confidence issues. Use the ends of lessons at first to reflect on their choices.

    Then the final part of your lesson can involve sharing ideas about what they learnt or something related to the overall concept that they should all have learnt.

    Try not to think of it as a linear journey of learning 1, 2, 3, 4 with some pupils "further ahead". Think of it as you are teaching a topic and all pupils have different prior knowledge/skills so each of them is going to have a different outcome by the end of the topic.

    Xxx

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    Thank you for your advice. My issue is that I'm skills based so my pupils do need to go through 4 and 5 to get to 6. It's incredibly frustrating. All I can think of doing is going off syllabus with some of them. They're already pushing at the ceiling of the module.

    Had a good lesson in the end though. My differentiation was awful at the top end as I expected but with feedback I have a bit of hope for next week's lesson. There's apparently no way to avoid going over the stuff more than once so I'll use your advice about small groups staying to learn a bit more and then letting them get on with it when I teach the others later.

    I've also gone from supporting a new unit to a year 9 class to teaching the whole thing. I think I'm worried about higher years

    So next week I'm teaching 3 classes, doing a pupil pursuit, sitting in on an English class or two and I'm becoming a form tutor.

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    Hey.
    I am aware this probably isn't the right thread to post in but I have a primary pgce interview next week and I just wondered if anybody would like to give me any advice about interviews and personal experience you may have encountered!
    Good luck to all those trainee teachers BTW, I am sure you are doing an amazing job!! Xxx

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    (Original post by swarfliam)
    Yayy, my first observation went well!
    Well done! Xx

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