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    (Original post by Gerald DGrilla)
    Thanks guys, all good advice.

    I am going to the 2nd July Open Day, which hopefully will lead to a final choice but I agree, they are all good.

    I did try to research the teaching staff on the internet but it got a bit confusing, one source said 4 tutors, others said 6 - and then the names were different... I looked at the Oxford website, the colleges' own websites and the prospectuses... quite a lot of variance... very odd. Do the tutors/fellows move around a lot?
    There's a fair degree of movement of more junior academics (usually those holding posts that aren't fellowships like lecturer or non-stipendiary lecturer) as their appointments tend to be shorter term for various reasons. Fellows and those holding senior faculty positions move around less, but you do sometimes see generational shifts where a College may have all of its existing fellows in a particular subject move on within a smallish period of time.
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    (Original post by jenkinsear)
    There's a fair degree of movement of more junior academics (usually those holding posts that aren't fellowships like lecturer or non-stipendiary lecturer) as their appointments tend to be shorter term for various reasons. Fellows and those holding senior faculty positions move around less, but you do sometimes see generational shifts where a College may have all of its existing fellows in a particular subject move on within a smallish period of time.
    Great.
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    (Original post by Gerald DGrilla)
    Yes, that makes sense. But, how is one supposed to get a feel for the number, experience and specialist areas of the tutors who will play such an important part in one's life?

    If one had a particular interest in, say Latin Comedy or Greek Tragedy, one might apply at to a certain college which appeared to have a renowned expert in the field. But what if she has moved on and the tutors there now were specialists in quite different fields, say Augustan Poetry or the Oxyrhynchus Papyri Project? How unfortunate.
    Basically all you can do is go on who is currently there. It is likely that when you turn up on day one they will still be there. If they are not you will still have access to someone who is an expert in the area you're interested in, they may just be based at a different college. For you as a student the only real difference is that you have to go to a different college for a tutorial; they are still "your" tutor and I always found they were just as keen to support and advise you even if you were from a different College.

    (Original post by Gerald DGrilla)
    This is not supposed to be a criticism, but it would be helpful to know the best way to research these pivotal characters in one's career.

    Perhaps the great attraction to our subject is its diversity and range, but is this also our biggest risk, to be matched to the wrong expert?

    Or, does it not matter at all, as it all falls out in the wash at Faculty level.
    (As a general comment- I don't do Classics) When it comes to optional topics, you're into faculty level. Where the expert is doesn't really matter; you go to them. With core subjects, who you has it determined by which Colleges you are at for the most part but you're all taught the same thing as the course is identical.

    (Original post by Gerald DGrilla)
    And, if it is a problem at Oxford, what of turning up at Durham to find that the star teacher who was your reason for applying, is there no more. Have the lesser universities (apologies, I do not mean to be condescending, I might be there myself) got the depth to make up for it.

    Maybe I should get back to the books, and just apply to the college I feel comfortable in; stop over analysing and just get on and enjoy the whole experience!?!
    I think you should take your own advice really- it's good you're thinking everything through and taking it seriously, but ultimately wherever you end up you'll be fine. It's not easy to judge how good someone is as a tutor until you actually have them as a tutor. I was surprised sometimes to find those who had the least experience/reputation were often much better tutors. Best thing I can advise is to book on the open day at a College you like, go to the Classics subject talk and have a chat with the tutors. That's as much of an idea about them as you can get besides looking them up online I think.
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    (Original post by Gerald DGrilla)
    Yes, that makes sense. But, how is one supposed to get a feel for the number, experience and specialist areas of the tutors who will play such an important part in one's life?

    If one had a particular interest in, say Latin Comedy or Greek Tragedy, one might apply at to a certain college which appeared to have a renowned expert in the field. But what if she has moved on and the tutors there now were specialists in quite different fields, say Augustan Poetry or the Oxyrhynchus Papyri Project? How unfortunate.

    This is not supposed to be a criticism, but it would be helpful to know the best way to research these pivotal characters in one's career.

    Perhaps the great attraction to our subject is its diversity and range, but is this also our biggest risk, to be matched to the wrong expert?

    Or, does it not matter at all, as it all falls out in the wash at Faculty level.

    And, if it is a problem at Oxford, what of turning up at Durham to find that the star teacher who was your reason for applying, is there no more. Have the lesser universities (apologies, I do not mean to be condescending, I might be there myself) got the depth to make up for it.

    Maybe I should get back to the books, and just apply to the college I feel comfortable in; stop over analysing and just get on and enjoy the whole experience!?!
    All very good advice from Jenkinsear!

    The way it works with Classics, is that in the first year you take the same topics as every other Classics student and this will be taught by the tutors in your college as they are general papers. Then as you get further through your degree you start choosing papers yourself. If these can be taught in your college they will be, but if not then your tutor will organise for you to go to a different college where there is another tutor who is a specialist in it. For example, next term I'm studying a philosophy paper - none of the Classics tutors at Univ teach philosophy, so I'm going to Christ Church for it.

    Classics tutors don't move around that much from what I know. By all means look at the college websites and Classics faculty list - but it's much better in my opinion to base your decision on the feel of the college and other practical matters. Unless you took a particular dislike to a certain tutor on an open day (unlikely!).

    Any other queries just let me know
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    (Original post by jenkinsear)
    Basically all you can do is go on who is currently there. It is likely that when you turn up on day one they will still be there. If they are not you will still have access to someone who is an expert in the area you're interested in, they may just be based at a different college. For you as a student the only real difference is that you have to go to a different college for a tutorial; they are still "your" tutor and I always found they were just as keen to support and advise you even if you were from a different College.



    (As a general comment- I don't do Classics) When it comes to optional topics, you're into faculty level. Where the expert is doesn't really matter; you go to them. With core subjects, who you has it determined by which Colleges you are at for the most part but you're all taught the same thing as the course is identical.



    I think you should take your own advice really- it's good you're thinking everything through and taking it seriously, but ultimately wherever you end up you'll be fine. It's not easy to judge how good someone is as a tutor until you actually have them as a tutor. I was surprised sometimes to find those who had the least experience/reputation were often much better tutors. Best thing I can advise is to book on the open day at a College you like, go to the Classics subject talk and have a chat with the tutors. That's as much of an idea about them as you can get besides looking them up online I think.


    That is brilliant, really helpful. Thanks
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    (Original post by Lucilou101)
    All very good advice from Jenkinsear!

    The way it works with Classics, is that in the first year you take the same topics as every other Classics student and this will be taught by the tutors in your college as they are general papers. Then as you get further through your degree you start choosing papers yourself. If these can be taught in your college they will be, but if not then your tutor will organise for you to go to a different college where there is another tutor who is a specialist in it. For example, next term I'm studying a philosophy paper - none of the Classics tutors at Univ teach philosophy, so I'm going to Christ Church for it.

    Classics tutors don't move around that much from what I know. By all means look at the college websites and Classics faculty list - but it's much better in my opinion to base your decision on the feel of the college and other practical matters. Unless you took a particular dislike to a certain tutor on an open day (unlikely!).

    Any other queries just let me know
    Also extremely helpful, I feel much happier now. Thanks.
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    Hey guys,

    For anyone looking to get some genuine experience of what it'd be like to live and study in one of the colleges (specifically Queen's), check out these 'Little Open Days' running throughout this term, so there are loads of spaces for anyone who would like a place:

    http://www.queens.ox.ac.uk/admission...ach/open-days/

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    (Original post by personage)
    Interesting Correlation between number of fIRST CLASS degrees and college wealth --is that because good food and accomodation makes for more productive students. Or is it that he wealthier colleges are more popular with applicants, so they can cherry pick candidates?
    Any thoughts anyone?
    Colleges (and universities in general) gain status and reputation by being world leading in research and producing cohorts with high academic ability. They get money through alumni and government funding. This reputation builds up and applicants want to go to such places. Colleges then have a wider range of applications to choose from. Therefore, they can produce better graduates and build a larger reputation and wealth. This leads to more prospective applicants. I would go with your second statement: 'Or is it that he wealthier colleges are more popular with applicants, so they can cherry pick candidates?'
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    (Original post by Reu2015)
    Colleges (and universities in general) gain status and reputation by being world leading in research and producing cohorts with high academic ability. They get money through alumni and government funding. This reputation builds up and applicants want to go to such places. Colleges then have a wider range of applications to choose from. Therefore, they can produce better graduates and build a larger reputation and wealth. This leads to more prospective applicants. I would go with your second statement: 'Or is it that he wealthier colleges are more popular with applicants, so they can cherry pick candidates?'
    Worcester is (well was- I think they've raised not far off £75 million in the last year) incredibly poor but did very well in Norrington last year and the year before. Seems to call into question the suggestion that wealthy colleges do better. Applicant numbers are also high at places like Worcester (second to BNC most years) despite them being poor as hell.
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    Any prospective geographers - you might be interested in the open day on the 15th of June! I found it really good: you get a couple of mini-lectures at the department, and also get a bit of a look round Oxford and one of the colleges (PS if you book and can't decide on a college to have lunch at I hear Hertford is pretty amazing)
    http://www.geog.ox.ac.uk/undergraduate/opendays.html
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    (Original post by AKell17)
    Any prospective geographers - you might be interested in the open day on the 15th of June! I found it really good: you get a couple of mini-lectures at the department, and also get a bit of a look round Oxford and one of the colleges (PS if you book and can't decide on a college to have lunch at I hear Hertford is pretty amazing)
    http://www.geog.ox.ac.uk/undergraduate/opendays.html
    Thanks would you recommend it over the complete Oxford open day or not? I don't think I can get to both


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    Anyone going to the 1st/2nd of July Open Day?
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    (Original post by Oakflame)
    Anyone going to the 1st/2nd of July Open Day?
    Meeeee! The 1st

    Ok, so I keep on meaning to post:

    GCSEs: 9A*s, 2As (Music, RS), 1B (Latin twilight)

    A Levels: English, History, Philosophy and Economics (predicted A, A, A, A/B respectively). Planning to drop Econ at the end of the year and do an EPQ next year :O

    Course: History!

    College: Narrowed it down to Balliol, Wadham or Univ........

    Anyone else wanting to do History out there?! Good luck all!!


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    (Original post by lifescomplexity)
    Meeeee! The 1st

    Ok, so I keep on meaning to post:

    GCSEs: 9A*s, 2As (Music, RS), 1B (Latin twilight)

    A Levels: English, History, Philosophy and Economics (predicted A, A, A, A/B respectively). Planning to drop Econ at the end of the year and do an EPQ next year :O

    Course: History!

    College: Narrowed it down to Balliol, Wadham or Univ........

    Anyone else wanting to do History out there?! Good luck all!!


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    Going too, but the 2nd Booked my flights yesterday! Interested in PPE though... How did you narrow it down with the colleges? I find it really hard
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    (Original post by Oakflame)
    Going too, but the 2nd Booked my flights yesterday! Interested in PPE though... How did you narrow it down with the colleges? I find it really hard
    I went for the one at Open Day with a free breakfast!

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    LMH ! x
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    (Original post by aasvogel)
    I went for the one at Open Day with a free breakfast!

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    Hahaha Sounds good! I'm going to travel London -> Oxford in the morning, so I'm aiming for eating lunch at one of the colleges
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    (Original post by Oakflame)
    Going too, but the 2nd Booked my flights yesterday! Interested in PPE though... How did you narrow it down with the colleges? I find it really hard
    Wow, flights, you must be international! Cool! Where are you from? Haha I live in London so feel horrendously well-connected, I am humbled that you have to fly while I can just get the Oxford Tube (takes 90 mins!!).

    Yeah PPE interesting, just knew History was always the one for me As for colleges, just went through them forever and ever just narrowing it down... Try and and think of what you want from a college: near the centre? Old? High % state school? Do you want accommodation for all 3 years? Do you want quite a traditional college with lots of formals and gown-wearing? Or not? And there are other features that might interest you - eg Balliol is the only college with a student run bar (i think!), Wadham has its own music festival and its JCR is actually a union, Magdalen has a deer park and has a famous choir etc. Each college has distinctive features To get a starting point I would recommend this site:

    http://www.chooseoxfordcollege.co.uk

    You can rank the colleges according to what's important to you, it's really useful! Also, you can use the Alternative Prospectus, written by students so you get a good insight into the differences between the colleges a lot of colleges have their own alternative prospectuses too. Here's the uni-wide one:

    http://issuu.com/ousu/docs/ap2014-16?e=0/7242535

    Hope this eases your pain slightly... good luck!


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    (Original post by lifescomplexity)
    Wow, flights, you must be international! Cool! Where are you from? Haha I live in London so feel horrendously well-connected, I am humbled that you have to fly while I can just get the Oxford Tube (takes 90 mins!!).

    Yeah PPE interesting, just knew History was always the one for me As for colleges, just went through them forever and ever just narrowing it down... Try and and think of what you want from a college: near the centre? Old? High % state school? Do you want accommodation for all 3 years? Do you want quite a traditional college with lots of formals and gown-wearing? Or not? And there are other features that might interest you - eg Balliol is the only college with a student run bar (i think!), Wadham has its own music festival and its JCR is actually a union, Magdalen has a deer park and has a famous choir etc. Each college has distinctive features To get a starting point I would recommend this site:

    http://www.chooseoxfordcollege.co.uk

    You can rank the colleges according to what's important to you, it's really useful! Also, you can use the Alternative Prospectus, written by students so you get a good insight into the differences between the colleges a lot of colleges have their own alternative prospectuses too. Here's the uni-wide one:

    http://issuu.com/ousu/docs/ap2014-16?e=0/7242535

    Hope this eases your pain slightly... good luck!


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    I'm from Sweden, so it's not that far Also, I am going to the Open Day at LSE the 1st, and then Oxford the 2nd, so at least I don't have to travel twice

    Do you know how difficult/easy it is to travel from central London to Oxford? I have heard someone recommended the X90 (100 mins, Victoria Station-> Oxford) But maybe there are other alternatives? Hard for me to know as I'm not from the area

    It's so hard with colleges! I'm not very picky, and would probably be ecstatic with whichever, as long as I got in So unfortunately the site where you can rank them wasn't for me - Isn't really bothered by any of the options! However, the alternative prospectus is great. It make sit easier to get an overlook on all colleges. Also found it great that it mentioned kitchen facilities, because that's probably one of the few things that I REALLY would like to have access to

    Thank you for the advice!
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    (Original post by Oakflame)
    I'm from Sweden, so it's not that far Also, I am going to the Open Day at LSE the 1st, and then Oxford the 2nd, so at least I don't have to travel twice

    Do you know how difficult/easy it is to travel from central London to Oxford? I have heard someone recommended the X90 (100 mins, Victoria Station-> Oxford) But maybe there are other alternatives? Hard for me to know as I'm not from the area

    It's so hard with colleges! I'm not very picky, and would probably be ecstatic with whichever, as long as I got in So unfortunately the site where you can rank them wasn't for me - Isn't really bothered by any of the options! However, the alternative prospectus is great. It make sit easier to get an overlook on all colleges. Also found it great that it mentioned kitchen facilities, because that's probably one of the few things that I REALLY would like to have access to

    Thank you for the advice!
    Glad it helped! You can always submit an open application, where you are just assigned a college and don't have to pick one - it doesn't disadvantage your application or anything

    Ah that is good you're going to LSE too - a busy few days then! Sweden is awesome your English is incredible too btw!
    It's very easy to get to Oxford - the cheapest (and still quite quick) way is to get the Oxford Tube. It's a coach service that runs regularly between London and Oxford and a young person's return ticket is only £13 - cheaper than the train by far! You can catch it from London Victoria, Notting Hill Gate and a few other places in London, and it gets you to Oxford in 1hr40 mins Here's the site:

    http://www.oxfordtube.com

    I have caught it a couple of times when I've been to Oxford for subject open days and it's really efficient and easy to use. The X90 is a similar service although as I understand it the Oxford Tube is more popular



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