Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

Which graduates are most likely to make 50k+ in their careers? Watch

    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by 19cvabn)
    how would you know about this thing? Are you a dentist? (Dont think so) Im sorry youre speaking with 0.5 years of experience assuming that individual just graduated from university. 0.5 years of experience = 60k, wow, lets be realistic ok.
    Its a year experience, not 0.5. Go look at government figures if you want, thats how i know. Not to mention my uncle is a dentist who trains foundation dentists
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by 19cvabn)
    I have a question, if you reach 50k+ salary benchmark, do you proclaim yourself as rich?
    I'd consider myself totally unhappy with where I am, and would want to just work hard in silence up until £65k. At £80k I'll feel and be middle-class and 'rich' enough to buy the things I want, albeit over a long time. After £110k, I'll feel 'rich' (in terms of the money you get after tax with that, which is about £66k). Anything over £110k is great, and I'd work for it, but I wouldn't be pressed or upset if I fail to get beyond it.

    You can always juggle multiple jobs and overtime of course.

    My perspective on what amount of money would make me content would change if I got a City job however, as I'd then have the potential to make tons more.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    The happy graduates are most likely to earn 50K+ in their career.
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by lllllllllll)
    The happy graduates are most likely to earn 50K+ in their career.
    Wait, what? As in the only ones that are happy are the ones that know they'll get 50+ cos of their degree, university, contacts or social and economic capital/you're only gonna be happy (as a graduate) if you become moderately well-off (50k isn't 'rich', at all)? Or as in if you're happy in what you do, you'll get over 50 anyhow?

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    People who are seriously money driven will rarely be happy with how much they earn, as soon as you're earning your "target salary" the boundaries just get moved up.
    • Political Ambassador
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Wisefire)
    Lol exactly, you need to just pass the specific accounting exams. Would you say it's therefore better to do something more general like an economics or maths degree, than a finance or accounting one?

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Obviously, since Accounting and Finance is generally seen as a pushover degree (having looked at the content it's not particularly surprising). According to my dad, it does however mean you might get some exceptions as far as the specific exams go when looking for a job, but a more challenging degree I believe is much better, especially given it leaves more doors easily opened if you do well, given you will likely do it to prove your competence.
    • Political Ambassador
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by 19cvabn)
    I have a question, if you reach 50k+ salary benchmark, do you proclaim yourself as rich?
    Even in 2014 GBP, not really. Moderately well off, maybe, but far from rich.
    Offline

    5
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Wisefire)
    OK, thanks for this, but what about career progression from £50k? Is it more than possible to get towards £80k with this sort of degree after 10 or so years? So, senior/executive/directorial roles or just better paid jobs?

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Well the next stage is mid senior to senior management (around 90-100k, then 100-150k excl bonuses where I work (ive seen the payroll figures)

    It isn't so defined however, as most cases it comes down to how good you are and if you have the leadership skills to manage a team.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    5
    ReputationRep:
    5 of my colleagues at work in my specific team did A&F, all in managerial roles.

    Really depends more on the person, I absolutely cannot stress that enough.

    Your degree merely pushes you past the acceptance line, the rest you have to do for yourself ie work experience, personality.

    Not enough people in this thread realise this. A degree and a notional path doesn't do squat unless you can build on other softer aspects as well as experience.

    Let's say, you bury your head in books for 3 years at uni. You have gained no practical experience, you will barely get past grad scheme first stage.

    If your attitude stinks, and a potential employer doesn't feel like your personality 'fits' despite you having grades or even experience in many cases, then bye bye job...

    In the same way, even if you do manage to do amazingly in exams and your first entry level role, you will always be looked over for management roles as you don't have leadership skills. You're a liability if you can't inspire/bring the best out of your team.

    So you'll be forever capped at the lower end of the salary scale but never the dizzying heights of £100k.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    LLB Law & also Business Economics from Russell Group Uni's.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    I think the conclusion I can reach from reading all the replies here is no degree except medicine or dentistry will guarantee you making 50k.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Pipsico)
    5 of my colleagues at work in my specific team did A&F, all in managerial roles.

    Really depends more on the person, I absolutely cannot stress that enough.

    Your degree merely pushes you past the acceptance line, the rest you have to do for yourself ie work experience, personality.

    Not enough people in this thread realise this. A degree and a notional path doesn't do squat unless you can build on other softer aspects as well as experience.

    Let's say, you bury your head in books for 3 years at uni. You have gained no practical experience, you will barely get past grad scheme first stage.

    If your attitude stinks, and a potential employer doesn't feel like your personality 'fits' despite you having grades or even experience in many cases, then bye bye job...

    In the same way, even if you do manage to do amazingly in exams and your first entry level role, you will always be looked over for management roles as you don't have leadership skills. You're a liability if you can't inspire/bring the best out of your team.

    So you'll be forever capped at the lower end of the salary scale but never the dizzying heights of £100k.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    So, apart from making it apparent you really are highly enthusiastic about being successful/having a successful (and I suppose somewhat lucrative) job, and leading a successful team, what can someone do, in terms of work experience, to show they possess 'leadership skills' at an early age (i.e now, as a 17 year old like I am)? What can I do now to bolster my experiences/competencies/'qualifications' in leadership (as I'm fully aware you need to clearly show evidence of what you say you are in your CV)? Any suggestions, anyone?

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Wisefire)
    So, apart from making it apparent you really are highly enthusiastic about being successful/having a successful (and I suppose somewhat lucrative) job, and leading a successful team, what can someone do, in terms of work experience, to show they possess 'leadership skills' at an early age (i.e now, as a 17 year old like I am)? What can I do now to bolster my experiences/competencies/'qualifications' in leadership (as I'm fully aware you need to clearly show evidence of what you say you are in your CV)? Any suggestions, anyone?

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    DofE? Captaining a sports team?
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by stirkee)
    DofE? Captaining a sports team?
    Right, thanks. I'll try and do DofE in year 13/next year. I've never done anything in sports within schools (not to say I'm not sporty lol, I like cycling. A lot), so I'll see if I can do something significant in sports within university.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by stirkee)
    DofE? Captaining a sports team?
    You dont need to have these programs to emphasize that you have leadership skills, but if you managed to get one. Thats great!
    Offline

    5
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Wisefire)
    So, apart from making it apparent you really are highly enthusiastic about being successful/having a successful (and I suppose somewhat lucrative) job, and leading a successful team, what can someone do, in terms of work experience, to show they possess 'leadership skills' at an early age (i.e now, as a 17 year old like I am)? What can I do now to bolster my experiences/competencies/'qualifications' in leadership (as I'm fully aware you need to clearly show evidence of what you say you are in your CV)? Any suggestions, anyone?

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    By being the head of some society at uni, or the treasurer
    Be a student ambassador
    Volunteering for a charity and doing some fundraising - shows you have some public speaking skills and can work who people.

    All these are fairly easy to obtain whilst at uni. Of course, it would be even better if you could demonstrate it in the working world eg being a supervisor in retail. But that isn't entirely necessary.

    What is even more important is that you work on your relationship with people. What I've read from your posts so far makes you seem like an unsociable hermit. Nows the time to get out there and engage with people, and improve your social skills.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by trustmeimlying1)
    what job do you have your sights on

    I completely agree but if youre gonna be in the higher tax brand you may as well make it worthwhile and earn a good bit
    My life goal has always been to be an exhibiting and commercially successful visual artist. Other fields that would probably suit me are being a therapist, psychologist, or counsellor of some kind. I wouldn't mind being a social worker or working for social services in such a way that would be of interest to me and positively benefit people's lives. I wouldn't mind museum conservation work or curating for a while. Though I'm told I should become a poet . I'm just going to do what I love and see where it takes me to be fair.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Temporality)
    My life goal has always been to be an exhibiting and commercially successful visual artist. Other fields that would probably suit me are being a therapist, psychologist, or counsellor of some kind. I wouldn't mind being a social worker or working for social services in such a way that would be of interest to me and positively benefit people's lives. I wouldn't mind museum conservation work or curating for a while. Though I'm told I should become a poet . I'm just going to do what I love and see where it takes me to be fair.
    not a bad way to live..I just hope yeh get a job...
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    The figures for associate dentists earning 60k is including part time dentists too. If you prefer to work more than 9-5 80-90k is attainable as an associate. The reason why the pay is so high is because you earn money based on how much you work, you're not paid a salary. If you're an incompetent dentist and it takes you ages to do anything, its going to be hard to even make 50k.
    Bear in mind dentists take 6 years to train, big time IBs and Lawyers can earn that type of money earlier and they have MUCH higher ceilings.
    Offline

    8
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by andbegin)
    The figures for associate dentists earning 60k is including part time dentists too. If you prefer to work more than 9-5 80-90k is attainable as an associate. The reason why the pay is so high is because you earn money based on how much you work, you're not paid a salary. If you're an incompetent dentist and it takes you ages to do anything, its going to be hard to even make 50k.
    Bear in mind dentists take 6 years to train, big time IBs and Lawyers can earn that type of money earlier and they have MUCH higher ceilings.
    Not many lawyers earn that kind of money within 6 years of starting their degree though.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Did TEF Bronze Award affect your UCAS choices?
    Useful resources

    Articles and guides:

    Hands typing

    Degrees without fees

    Discover more about degree-level apprenticeships.

    A-Z of careers Advice on choosing a careerCV writing helpCovering letter helpInterview tips

    Featured recruiter profiles:

    CGI logo

    CGI is open for applications

    "Offering a range of apprentice and sponsored degree positions."

    Deutsche Bank logo

    Deutsche Bank is recruiting

    "Thrive in an international banking environment"

    ICAEW logo

    Merck

    "Merck is a global leader in specialized pharma & chemicals – join us!"

    Army logo

    The Army is recruiting now

    "With hundreds of roles available, there’s more than one way to be the best."

    Bianca Miller, runner-up on The Apprentice

    Handle your digital footprint

    What would an employer find out about you on Google? Find out how to take control.

    Quick links:

    Unanswered career sector and employment threads

    Groups associated with this forum:

    View associated groups
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.