Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
x Turn on thread page Beta

Edexcel FP3 - 27th June, 2016 watch

  • View Poll Results: How did you find the Edexcel FP3 exam?
    Very hard
    41
    8.40%
    Hard
    69
    14.14%
    Normal
    156
    31.97%
    Easy
    165
    33.81%
    Very easy
    57
    11.68%

    Offline

    4
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by thatapanydude)
    Can someone give my a hand, cant see where I'm going wrong! Question is from the Mixed Exercise of FP3 on Differentiation.
    I cant find where you've gone wrong but I believe it's somewhere in the stages of finding d2y/dx2, you didn't write a lot down with the differentiation, the substitution and the rearranging all done in one step, you've most likely made an error there, try splitting it up a bit.

    Suggestion is, if you cant find the differential of something one way, try doing it with another method like quotient rule. When you have y = 1/coshx, use quotient rule twice and it gives you a reasonably nice thing that works to give you the solution.
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Craig1998)
    I cant find where you've gone wrong but I believe it's somewhere in the stages of finding d2y/dx2, you didn't write a lot down with the differentiation, the substitution and the rearranging all done in one step, you've most likely made an error there, try splitting it up a bit.

    Suggestion is, if you cant find the differential of something one way, try doing it with another method like quotient rule. When you have y = 1/coshx, use quotient rule twice and it gives you a reasonably nice thing that works to give you the solution.
    Thanks mate for the response. I agree it's probably easier to use quotient rather than implicit differentiation, I shall see how that goes. thanks again!
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by oShahpo)
    If line L belongs to plane pi, then it must be perpendicular to its normal n. If it also belongs to plane pi 2, then it must also be perpendicular to its normal n2. Therefore, it is parallel to the common perpendicular to the two normals. You find the common perpendicular using the cross product.
    (Original post by physicsmaths)
    Imagine two pieces of paper meeting each other. See the two vectors as the directions of each plane. The cross product is the normal to these(which is parralel to the line through intersections clearly). A diagram helps.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Ah I see! So the direction vector of the line is perpendicular to the normals of the two planes?
    i.e. let the direction vector of the line be d, so d = n1 x n2

    How do they find a point on the line after?
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Name:  ImageUploadedByStudent Room1465691237.231094.jpg
Views: 155
Size:  32.2 KB
    How do I solve this to get these equations to get the Eigenvector values, I get all equal to zero and its wrong. Thanks


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    4
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by jkhan9625)
    Name:  ImageUploadedByStudent Room1465691237.231094.jpg
Views: 155
Size:  32.2 KB
    How do I solve this to get these equations to get the Eigenvector values, I get all equal to zero and its wrong. Thanks


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Try rearranging the middle equation to get one in terms of x, then substituting this into the 3rd equation. This gives you ay=bz (where a and b are integers). Which you should be able to use.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by physicsmaths)
    Imagine two pieces of paper meeting each other. See the two vectors as the directions of each plane. The cross product is the normal to these(which is parralel to the line through intersections clearly). A diagram helps.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Hi im just wondering how they found the point on the line?? Also, did you sit STEP I today ... if so, i hope it went well!
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Not a lot of people sitting FP3 this year, it would seem...
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Craig1998)
    Try rearranging the middle equation to get one in terms of x, then substituting this into the 3rd equation. This gives you ay=bz (where a and b are integers). Which you should be able to use.
    Thanks got it


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    I hope this year's paper isn't like the previous 2 years...but judging by the difficulty of the FP2 paper that came up it may as well be...
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    For the edexcel further maths A2 what is required for an A*. I am doing M2, M3, M4, S2, FP1, FP2, FP3. Do you have to get an average of over 90% in your best 3 A2 modules and must this include either FP2 or FP3 or could it just be M2 M3 and M4 for example??
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by federer98)
    For the edexcel further maths A2 what is required for an A*. I am doing M2, M3, M4, S2, FP1, FP2, FP3. Do you have to get an average of over 90% in your best 3 A2 modules and must this include either FP2 or FP3 or could it just be M2 M3 and M4 for example??
    Any 3 A2 modules. Could even be M2 S2 M3.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    I've put FP3 on hold for like 2-3 weeks, and S2 for around a month maybe more. A lot to do after M2 tomorrow :cry2:

    I don't think I'll be revising for C3 and C4..
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by edothero)
    I've put FP3 on hold for like 2-3 weeks, and S2 for around a month maybe more. A lot to do after M2 tomorrow :cry2:

    I don't think I'll be revising for C3 and C4..
    The beauty of studying FP2 and FP3 is that C3 and C4 are pretty much in the bag. There's just a few things like the binomial expansion, Rcos(x-alpha), rates of change, etc. that don't appear in FP2 and FP3 and need recapped.

    C3 and C4 are like baby maths after studying FP2 and FP3*

    * famous last words
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by oinkk)
    The beauty of studying FP2 and FP3 is that C3 and C4 are pretty much in the bag. There's just a few things like the binomial expansion, Rcos(x-alpha), rates of change, etc. that don't appear in FP2 and FP3 and need recapped.

    C3 and C4 are like baby maths after studying FP2 and FP3*

    * famous last words
    Haha yeah I'm pretty much banking on my existing knowledge :yy:
    Might do a past paper the night before or something..
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    Name:  maths.png
Views: 138
Size:  14.8 KB

    Can anyone explain to me where the mark scheme gets the \sqrt 5 from on the second line please?
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by MattOGrady)
    Name:  maths.png
Views: 138
Size:  14.8 KB

    Can anyone explain to me where the mark scheme gets the \sqrt 5 from on the second line please?
    arsinhx = ln(x + root(x^2 + 1))
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    If less people are sitting the exam then that is bad. More people=more chances for lower boundaries. Guess the only way is to actually prepare for it :borat:
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    Time to kick start this mofo again.

    Name:  123.jpg
Views: 123
Size:  52.0 KB

    Help! Somebody!
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Inges)
    Time to kick start this mofo again.

    Name:  123.jpg
Views: 123
Size:  52.0 KB

    Help! Somebody!
    Figure out some lines, then connect them with your equations.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by 130398)
    If less people are sitting the exam then that is bad. More people=more chances for lower boundaries. Guess the only way is to actually prepare for it :borat:
    This is so unfortunate tbh.

    Not sure what's the cause of drop in FP3.
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
Turn on thread page Beta
Updated: August 20, 2016
Poll
Do you like carrot cake?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.