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    Exams are - or should be - to test the ability of a person completing a range of tasks in an allocated period of time compared to the rest of the population. As a person who is eligible for extra time and uses it (if it's offered to me then I may as well utilise it), I personally believe that giving extra time to those who are mentally slow at processing completely removes the purpose of having the exams - otherwise you may as well give everyone an unlimited amount of time.I do believe extra time should be permitted for people who have a physical disability, where it may take them longer to write, but people who are just slow at processing (the category of 'disability' I fit into) should not be given extra time. At the very least, penalty marks should be deducted for using more than the regular amount of time, or the individual given a different type of qualification.
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    As someone with dyslexia I have extra time at University in my exams. However out of all my exams I used it once... Only because I like to be the same as others.

    Someone with a learning disability should have ever right to have extra time.
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    (Original post by Gaya Ramanathan)
    It's a perfectly valid reason actually.
    "It's a perfectly valid reason actually" only if it affects your ability to be able to complete the exam in the set time limit. If every single person with autism was allowed to have extra time this would give them an unfair advantage over other candidates. Someone with Autism could be just as perfectly capable of completing the exam in the set time limit as someone without autism. Why should they be given extra time and not the other candidate? Gaining extra time just on the basis of a disability and using it as a grade booster is not fair and a clear exploitation of the disability. A disability should not be a direct passport to extra time difficulties associated that prevent you from completing the exam in the set time limit should.
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    (Original post by urbanlocations)
    As someone with dyslexia I have extra time at University in my exams. However out of all my exams I used it once... Only because I like to be the same as others.

    Someone with a learning disability should have ever right to have extra time.
    :yes:

    That's correct. Those people need it, as they are reading and writing slower as others. But kudos for you that you did not use your advantage so often. Was it hard for you?
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    (Original post by Tinka99)
    "It's a perfectly valid reason actually" only if it affects your ability to be able to complete the exam in the set time limit. If every single person with autism was allowed to have extra time this would give them an unfair advantage over other candidates. Someone with Autism could be just as perfectly capable of completing the exam in the set time limit as someone without autism. Why should they be given extra time and not the other candidate? Gaining extra time just on the basis of a disability and using it as a grade booster is not fair and a clear exploitation of the disability. A disability should not be a direct passport to extra time difficulties associated that prevent you from completing the exam in the set time limit should.
    If a person with a disability is capable of finishing exams in the standard time, they won't get extra time. However, if their disability prevents them, then they will, and there's nothing wrong with that.

    What's funny is, everyone is quick to say giving extra time to these people (with dyslexia, autism or anything preventing them from processing information or writing fast enough) is putting them at advantage - but we are at advantage for being clinically normal, lol.

    It's really not that deep.
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    (Original post by annieprincess)
    If a person with a disability is capable of finishing exams in the standard time, they won't get extra time. However, if their disability prevents them, then they will, and there's nothing wrong with that.

    What's funny is, everyone is quick to say giving extra time to these people (with dyslexia, autism or anything preventing them from processing information or writing fast enough) is putting them at advantage - but we are at advantage for being clinically normal, lol.

    It's really not that deep.
    To begin with, extra time is literally handed out to a huge amount people. From my experiences, I'd say a large percentage of people who qualify for extra time would in fact easily achieve a C grade or above without utilising the extended time period.
    To top that all off, anyone can also easily get extra time by simply faking the eligibility tests and acting dumb (although I think the ruling has recently changed to combat this).

    The idea of an examination is to actually test the mental capability of the person. If someone is unable to finish in the specified time, then they've failed the test. Everyone in agreement with extra time is under the impression that everyone should have the 'right' to pass the exams and that it's a matter of fairness and equality, when in actual fact, an exam is there to filter the mentally capable people from the slow and uneducated ones.
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    I am in year 10 and I have never heard of this thing, how do you qualify for this? lolz seems like a bait way to make GCSE's easier
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    (Original post by RaptorStar)
    I am in year 10 and I have never heard of this thing, how do you qualify for this? lolz seems like a bait way to make GCSE's easier
    I believe to qualify you have to have a registered mental or physical disorder, and then you have to take a short 30-minute test to see how fast you can read, process information and then write.

    Unfortunately, many mental conditions such as ADHD and mild cases of autism are over-diagnosed, which leads to way too many people being eligible for the extended examination time, giving many an unfair advantage (myself included - but I'm not going to decline the offering).
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    (Original post by ab2468)
    no, as someone said above, after finishing education you don't get extra time so why should you get it at school. Also lots of people with extra time really don't need and as the tests for it are easy to fail on purpose.
    Firstly, its not easy to apply for extra time. theres a fairly rigorous process to getting extra time and its hard to cheat on. maybe like 1% of people wrongly get extra time but for the most part it is necessary (I just made uo that statistic to clarify what i mean).

    Not being given extra time after education isnt always the case, and even if it is the case then what's the problem? They just wont get the job...

    Let's imagine an absolute genius and potential Nobel Peace price winner has medically slow cognition. By preventing him extra time, you have prevented him from doing that course at Cambridge. By doing that, you have denied him his right to that certain education, and his oppurtunity to be able to do that groundbreaking research (in his own time - research has less time constraints).

    You might think this is an exxagerated example, but Ive used it to illustrate the point that not everything is about time. The playing field should be level during education so everyone has equal opportunities after education. After education is a different matter like you said, but you can leave the filtering til then.
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    Of course it's fair. What's unfair is that nature has put some people at a disadvantage in the first place. Extra time just equalises that.
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    (Original post by FJ13)
    No.

    Plenty of people in my school have absolutely no learning difficulties whatsoever yet can easily "qualify" for free time.
    where's your medical degree?
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    (Original post by Tinka99)
    "It's a perfectly valid reason actually" only if it affects your ability to be able to complete the exam in the set time limit. If every single person with autism was allowed to have extra time this would give them an unfair advantage over other candidates. Someone with Autism could be just as perfectly capable of completing the exam in the set time limit as someone without autism. Why should they be given extra time and not the other candidate? Gaining extra time just on the basis of a disability and using it as a grade booster is not fair and a clear exploitation of the disability. A disability should not be a direct passport to extra time difficulties associated that prevent you from completing the exam in the set time limit should.
    I don't think you got what I was saying. You implied that autism alone shouldn't warrant extra time, right? So I am saying that there are some people with autism that do need extra time (as it is a spectrum) due to it affecting their performance. Not all but some.
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    (Original post by GeorgeBushDid911)
    I believe to qualify you have to have a registered mental or physical disorder, and then you have to take a short 30-minute test to see how fast you can read, process information and then write.
    No you don't always have to undergo a test. Well, I didn't. And if you have something like Dyslexia, it's written in your report how much extra time you should have.
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    It is, but nowadays it's been heavily abused. I knew a guy who didn't need extra time throughout GCSE's and AS and now we hit A2 all of a sudden he needs 'extra time'. Now that I don't rate...
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    I cannot claim to know the difficulties of anybody I know to have extra time, at least not to a sufficient standard to deduce if it puts them at an advantage or not, because I am not them, and I have limited understanding of the sorts of issues that lead to extra time. In general, I like to give people the benefit of the doubt. So if someone seems quick-witted and fast at working in general, and gets insanely good marks, but they also get extra time, I'm not going to get all jealous and think "they're cheating the system!" cos frankly I have no idea if they are cheating the system and the odds are surely that they aren't anyway.

    However I often wonder if I could have got extra time as I've suspected I have some degree of Asperger's for a while and in the early parts of exams I set off like a snail it seems, being very slow to understand and answer the questions (obviously this can have more of an effect in the shorter exam), but then the longer it goes I get more into it. Maybe that's just normal, I dunno. Also my handwriting is right on the precipice of being illegible and I've been told multiple times it could royally screw me (not exactly in those terms) in exams. It hasn't yet, but this term I think my writing has been particularly bad, so we'll see what my results say..
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    (Original post by GeorgeBushDid911)
    To begin with, extra time is literally handed out to a huge amount people. From my experiences, I'd say a large percentage of people who qualify for extra time would in fact easily achieve a C grade or above without utilising the extended time period.
    To top that all off, anyone can also easily get extra time by simply faking the eligibility tests and acting dumb (although I think the ruling has recently changed to combat this).

    The idea of an examination is to actually test the mental capability of the person. If someone is unable to finish in the specified time, then they've failed the test. Everyone in agreement with extra time is under the impression that everyone should have the 'right' to pass the exams and that it's a matter of fairness and equality, when in actual fact, an exam is there to filter the mentally capable people from the slow and uneducated ones.
    I understand some people who get extra time don't need it, but also it's not as simple as just acting dumb. There's a difference between processing information slowly or writing slowly to just being dumb. There may be some people who do get extra time without actually needing it, but then there's people who can claim benefits without actually needing it, or get surgery on the NHS without needing it but to rule it out completely would be setting up those who don't at disadvantage. The issue here with people not needing it is at the hands of the people carrying out assessments.

    All in all, though, extra time is completely fair. It's not like there's more people who use extra time and don't need it, than those who do.

    And you're completely wrong about everyone in agreement with extra time. Having extra time isn't ensuring that someone will pass or not. If they haven't revised enough, no matter the time they get, they won't pass. And honestly, that's silly. It's not the uneducated that get extra time, and the people who are slower SHOULD be able to get extra time so they aren't at disadvantage. Everything could be outside themselves. They could have had a lousy home environment, a mother who smoked during pregnancy, lack of healthy meals provided at home (or lack of meals at all) that cause them to be slow, putting any disorders aside. That is already putting them at disadvantage.

    The people who you deem 'slow' could go on to do great things. A girl who gets extra time because she can't write fast may get the grades to go to university and because a doctor, and save many people's lives. A boy who gets extra time may go on to university and then invent something that we need in this world. The extra time doesn't give them an advantage over everyone else, it just gives them the chance to show their capability, which most people can do in less time.

    Also, with the test being in timed conditions, IT'S STILL TIMED. It's not like they have all day to complete a test. They still have to complete it in timed conditions. A friend of mine is dyslexic and suffers with anxiety and she sometimes can't even finish her work in extra time, if she doesn't understand the question or can't remember the key scholars.

    Everyone seems so bitter about it. Worry about yourself.
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    (Original post by Gaya Ramanathan)
    I don't think you got what I was saying. You implied that autism alone shouldn't warrant extra time, right? So I am saying that there are some people with autism that do need extra time (as it is a spectrum) due to it affecting their performance. Not all but some.
    I completely agree that some people with Autism deserve extra time but not all. I am sorry if I misunderstood your statement but you were not very clear with what you were saying. You said "It's a perfectly valid reason actually" and I thought you were referring to the spectrum as a whole of being a valid reason and implying that all people on the spectrum deserve extra time, rather than only some.
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    (Original post by Tinka99)
    I completely agree that some people with Autism deserve extra time but not all. I am sorry if I misunderstood your statement but you were not very clear with what you were saying. You said "It's a perfectly valid reason actually" and I thought you were referring to the spectrum as a whole of being a valid reason and implying that all people on the spectrum deserve extra time, rather than only some.
    Ah no worries then, just a miscommunication.
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    (Original post by RaptorStar)
    I am in year 10 and I have never heard of this thing, how do you qualify for this? lolz seems like a bait way to make GCSE's easier
    You can't just get extra time you need to have a psychological disorder or some sort of disability. You also have to undergo tests for extra time and those test results should prove you actually need it. I get 25% extra time for all my exams I am in year 11.
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    I think the majority of the time it is fair, however in a few of my exams I've witnessed people with extra time write as much as me before the extended time which suggests maybe they never really needed it in the first place.
 
 
 
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