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2016 AQA Chemistry C2 - Unofficial Mark Scheme 2016 Watch

  • View Poll Results: How many marks do you think you got out of 60?
    0 - 10 marks
    1.86%
    11 - 20 marks
    2.26%
    21 - 30 marks
    10.23%
    31 - 40 marks
    19.52%
    41 - 50 marks
    36.25%
    51 - 60 marks
    29.88%

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    (Original post by MrAviator)
    I'm pretty sure the question said how nanoparticles compare to regular particles so they would be much smaller right?
    No, it asked how nanoparticles compare to the size of atoms.
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    (Original post by Benb2000)
    Oh well, you won't lose many marks, if you did well in the rest of the paper you could still easily be in the A* boundary
    Yes, hopefully. Good Luck with your remaining exams.
    Thank you
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    (Original post by Benb2000)
    No, it asked how nanoparticles compare to the size of atoms.
    Didn't the next question say how they are better than regular ones though. I put they have a larger surface area, a nano particle having a larger surface area to volume ratio than an atom doesn't make sense.
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    (Original post by Dr Carlsberg)
    Afraid not, nanoparticles are larger than atoms, because they are made up of them. But your thermometer answer should be fine because the resolution would make a difference.
    Was the nanoparticle question only one mark? And the one after about it being a better catalyst?

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    (Original post by Benb2000)
    No, it asked how nanoparticles compare to the size of atoms.
    Wasn't it how it compares to a powder?
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    For the percentage by mass question, I wrote 82.35% since they weren't asking about rounding etc, and the answer had many digits, so would I still get the mark for 82.35%??
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    (Original post by Yasminxb)
    For the percentage by mass question, I wrote 82.35% since they weren't asking about rounding etc, and the answer had many digits, so would I still get the mark for 82.35%??
    thats what I wrote should be fine there will probs be a range
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    (Original post by Naco88)
    Wasn't it how it compares to a powder?
    There were two questions I believe, one for asking how the size of a nanoparticle compares with that of an atom and then another one asking how 1g of something is more effective using either nanoparticles or atoms as the catalyst. Something like that.
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    (Original post by dee08)
    Was the nanoparticle question only one mark? And the one after about it being a better catalyst?

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    Yeah, I think they were both individual one markers
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    (Original post by Benb2000)
    No, that's wrong, it asked how it compared to the size of an atom, in which case the nanoparticles are much bigger
    Damn, that is so sneaky. I basically skimmed the question thinking it was like the one i had seen so many times before in past papers.

    Lost a mark because of it
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    (Original post by Naco88)
    Wasn't it how it compares to a powder?
    There was two.

    First one was:
    How does the size of a nanoparticle compare in relation to the size of an atom?

    Second:
    Give a reason why 1g of Cobalt oxide nanoparticles would make a better catalyst than 1g of powder cobalt oxide.
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    (Original post by MrAviator)
    Didn't the next question say how they are better than regular ones though. I put they have a larger surface area, a nano particle having a larger surface area to volume ratio than an atom doesn't make sense.
    Properties of nanoparticles summed up from bitesize:

    "Nanoparticles of a material show different properties compared to larger particles of the same material. Forces of attraction between surfaces can appear to be weak on a larger scale, but on a nanoscale they are strong.One reason for this is the surface area to volume ratio. In nanoparticles this is very large. Atoms on the surface of a material are often more reactive than those in the centre, so a larger surface area means the material is more reactive."
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    (Original post by Anygy)
    Damn, that is so sneaky. I basically skimmed the question thinking it was like the one i had seen so many times before in past papers.

    Lost a mark because of it
    Hehe, AQA love doing this to people
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    What about the one where it asked "How can the student change the method to investigate the rate of reaction at 5°C?
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    (Original post by Moustafa123r)
    I think u need to put because sulphur is produced as a solid and this block the view or makes it turn to cloudy
    I made the stupid mistake of saying Sodium Chloride is insoluble. Although I didn't mention sulfur do you think I can get one mark for saying "insoluble precipitate which cannot dissolve"
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    (Original post by mmgnaahk123)
    What about the one where it asked "How can the student change the method to investigate the rate of reaction at 5°C?
    I said put it in a water bath to cool it down to 5 degrees
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    (Original post by arj2104)
    I said put it in a water bath to cool it down to 5 degrees
    Could you say change the initial temperature to which wverything is heated ? Like in the experiment it said everything was heated to a readying temp. Surely, this temperature needs to be less than 5 degreees?
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    (Original post by 1jonam16)
    Could you say change the initial temperature to which wverything is heated ? Like in the experiment it said everything was heated to a readying temp. Surely, this temperature needs to be less than 5 degreees?
    I thought it was a poorly worded question. Hopefully, if you gave an attempt to show that you would cool it to 5 degrees or reduce the overall temperature in some way, I think you can get the marks. It was a one marker so I doubt they were looking for a lot.
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    I wrote about insulating the beaker so that no heat is lost to the surroundings will that get a mark!
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    (Original post by mmgnaahk123)
    Nanoparticles are much smaller than normal atoms!
    I'm afraid you're wrong they actually , on average, consist of a few hundred atoms! Check the specification or look it up


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