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    right thanks a lot! I also don't understand this: こんいちは and こんばんは I've read the pronounciation are "konnichi wa" and "konban wa" even though the last character is now "wa" but "ha"...why does it change sound, instead of using the actual わ?
    (I'm studying from Japanese in Mangaland, any chance the spelling of the words is wrong?)
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    (Original post by Leonardo85)
    right thanks a lot! I also don't understand this: こんいちは and こんばんは I've read the pronounciation are "konnichi wa" and "konban wa" even though the last character is now "wa" but "ha"...why does it change sound, instead of using the actual わ?
    (I'm studying from Japanese in Mangaland, any chance the spelling of the words is wrong?)
    Because は is a particle.  When its used as a particle you pronounce it wa.

    The other one to watch out for is へ and is pronounced 'e' when you use it as a particle.

    Its also こんにちは
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    (Original post by gaijin)
    Because は is a particle.  When its used as a particle you pronounce it wa.

    The other one to watch out for is へ and is pronounced 'e' when you use it as a particle.

    Its also こんにちは
    uff, complicated...how long did it take you to being able to read both hiragana and katakana, with the pure, impure and diphthongs, without having to stop every second and think of the pronounciation of each character?
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    (Original post by Leonardo85)
    uff, complicated...how long did it take you to being able to read both hiragana and katakana, with the pure, impure and diphthongs, without having to stop every second and think of the pronounciation of each character?
    Difficult to say because when I started learning it, I was doing only a few hours a week. Now I'm doing a few hours a day. Even now I have the slight hiccup by misreading ン and ソ . You need to just keep looking at it and it'll stick. Obviously certain things are grouped together and when you tackle kanji you are looking at kana less and less.

    Katakana can be a *****, because in class people read it, read it again and then have a 5 second delay before finally realising what the word is. A good practice might be to trawl some websites and start reading the katakana. Obviously you are more than likely to get the meaning (not always) but it will help your reading.
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    hello.. anyone got any advice on Japanese dictionaries? If you're studying at uni, did you really use a dictionary? Or did you just go to online sites; when I studied Spanish I could easily have managed without a dictionary.
    Also, I was doing some research and it seems like a Jap<->Eng one as well as a kanji dictionary are recommended? The preferred one seems to be the Kodansha one.. opinions? thanks
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    How do you know when one word starts and finishes in japanese hiragana writing? It's normally all one long line.
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    Un. Kondasha Kanji Learner's Dictionary is good. I use that in the library and at home.

    I have a small Oxford one that I bring into class occasionally but that is only, English to Japanese - and its a bit rubbish in places. Outside of class I have a Kondasha waei and eiwa jisho and an electronic version I use on the laptop (Wakan.) If I'm trying to read kanji, I will use my Nintendo DS which I use to write out the kanji. That also has a Japanese to Japanese dictionary which is good.

    Could do with a more decent English to Japanese dictionary though.
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    (Original post by ShaolinTemple)
    How do you know when one word starts and finishes in japanese hiragana writing? It's normally all one long line.
    That's why God invented kanji and saved kana for the use of declination and grammar.
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    I would rather just work out where one hiragana word ends and finishes :cry:
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    ^^ Umm... Hi?

    Hajimimashiite.. watashi no namae wa IcedGreenTea desu. Dozo yoroshiku.

    :P I've always been interested in the Japanese language and culture. At Lancaster University last year, I had the opportunity to learn Japanese from a native. However, having transferred to Glasgow University this year... I don't know whether I'll be able to continue learning it from lessons!

    I've purchased quite a good book - the one I was taught from last year - Berlitz Essential Japanese, but I seem to be more interested in reading Sherlock Holmes novels than a book of study :P

    Hopefully, this thread will inspire me again and re-ignite my desire to be fluent in Japanese!!

    In addition to that :P I think it would be a good idea for those who are already fluent in Japanese to post small sentences, etc. ask non-fluent people to translate it and then correct the responses. I think that only practise and frequent usage can keep things in the memory - and that reading only from textbooks is not sufficient. Besides, there are slangs and phrases that are taught with too much formality in textbooks and which would be silly to use in common day to day conversations.
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    今年の夏二ヶ月間に日本にいた。まず、色々な旅行した(長崎、福岡、 広島、岡山,神戸、大阪、京都、飛騨高山、金沢 >_> ちょう忙し かった)その後 一ヶ月間に東京に住んだ。

    It's fun learning Japanese coloqualisms, and hearing how little regard people have for the grammar >_> like, in school you're taught things like:
    駅はどこですか?
    whereas you'd be far more likely to hear/say:
    駅は?
    And among friends you'd never say:
    これはなんですか?
    but:
    なに?これ?

    and then the fun ways people shorten words so:
    何かをしている or indeed anything with 〜ている
    becomes:
    何かしてる

    気持ち悪い becomes きもい
    恥ずかしい becomes はずい
    分からない becomes わかっない or わかっねえ
    good stuff~
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    (Original post by dominiclmorris)
    今年の夏二ヶ月間に日本にいた。まず、色々な旅行した(長崎、福岡、 広島、岡山,神戸、大阪、京都、飛騨高 山、金沢 >_> ちょう忙しかった)その後 一ヶ月間に東京に住んだ。

    It's fun learning Japanese coloqualisms, and hearing how little regard people have for the grammar >_> like, in school you're taught things like:
    駅はどこですか?
    whereas you'd be far more likely to hear/say:
    駅は?
    And among friends you'd never say:
    これはなんですか?
    but:
    なに?これ?

    and then the fun ways people shorten words so:
    何かをしている or indeed anything with 〜ている
    becomes:
    何かしてる

    気持ち悪い becomes きもい
    恥ずかしい becomes はずい
    分からない becomes わかっない or わかっねえ
    good stuff~
    Haha, the Japanese love abbreviations (often to four letters):

    デジタルカメラ = デジカメ
    copy & paste = コピペ
    family restuarants = ファミレス
    アニメーション = アニメ
    convenience store = コンビニ

    気色悪い = きしょい
    きもい = キモッ
    すごい = すげー
    めんどくさい = めんどい

    etc etc. No wonder people say that Japanese is deteriorating :o:

    Anyway, looks like you had a great time in Japan. If I may ask, how did you arrange the trip? Was it through some kind of organisation? Where did you live? Your Japanese must have improved a lot though if you lived there fore 2 months!
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    ahaha, I love how kimoi has an abreviation >_>
    It was really amazing, probably the best two months of my life. I've been before, but this is the first time I really made lots of Japanese friends, which makes such a difference. Nah, I just organised it myself, staying in hostels and the like. I stayed in Tomogaya, an area backing on to the opposite side of Yoyogi Koen to Harajuku, a really nice part of Tokyo and great connection to everywhere interesting. I booked it through Sakura House, a company specialising in short term rentals to foreigners.

    I'm not really sure, I get by fine most of the time, in mixing Japanese and English >_> My grammar still has a long way to go, and I've forgotten loads of basic vocab I learned ages ago. But then, I know some stuff which most other A level students prolly don't and am somewhat more fluent in getting my thoughts across with natural expression that might be the norm for how long I've studied. So yeah, I'm mega uneven, in someways making way more mistakes than people learning for only a year, but in otherways more natual than a lot of foreign students I think.

    where in japan is your family from?
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    (Original post by dominiclmorris)
    ahaha, I love how kimoi has an abreviation >_>
    It was really amazing, probably the best two months of my life. I've been before, but this is the first time I really made lots of Japanese friends, which makes such a difference. Nah, I just organised it myself, staying in hostels and the like. I stayed in Tomogaya, an area backing on to the opposite side of Yoyogi Koen to Harajuku, a really nice part of Tokyo and great connection to everywhere interesting. I booked it through Sakura House, a company specialising in short term rentals to foreigners.

    I'm not really sure, I get by fine most of the time, in mixing Japanese and English >_> My grammar still has a long way to go, and I've forgotten loads of basic vocab I learned ages ago. But then, I know some stuff which most other A level students prolly don't and am somewhat more fluent in getting my thoughts across with natural expression that might be the norm for how long I've studied. So yeah, I'm mega uneven, in someways making way more mistakes than people learning for only a year, but in otherways more natual than a lot of foreign students I think.

    where in japan is your family from?
    My family's based mainly in Kanagawa/Hiroshima/Niigata, but I grew up (if 5 years count) in Tokyo and that's where I'd call my home. You lived in a really nice area! So what were you doing during the day? Did you work, or go to a language school? Were there lots of foreigners around? Sorry for being rather nosy :p: I don't actually know what Japan's like these days, considering I've only been back twice in the last 12 years.

    Are you thinking of joining the Japanese soc at Cam?
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    Oh right, the typical inaka ancestors and tokai youth divide~
    Yeah, it was lovely, lots of nice bars and resturants, and it was nice getting to know the workers at my nearby 7/11 >_> Well, while I Was in Tokyo, my family came to visit for a couple of weeks which overlapped with a while at language school, but mostly hanging around, meeting people, shopping, eating well etc
    Hmm, I might, as long as it's not mostly anime otaku...
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    (Original post by Excalibur)
    Haha, the Japanese love abbreviations (often to four letters):

    デジタルカメラ = デジカメ
    copy & paste = コピペ
    family restuarants = ファミレス
    アニメーション = アニメ
    convenience store = コンビニ

    気色悪い = きしょい
    きもい = キモッ
    すごい = すげー
    めんどくさい = めんどい

    etc etc. No wonder people say that Japanese is deteriorating :o:
    I often say めんどうく。。。

    You missed off パソコン - this took me ages to figure out.

    外来語 is kinda weird, because some governmental organisations are now increasing their lexicon to anything katakana. The best I ever saw, was a news programme in Osaka about them fixing a front sign of an old building that had been there for about 80 years. They used the rather unimaginative;

    フロントリペア - to describe what was happening.

    Its like they want Japanese people to fail. If a Japanese person saw that in a newspaper, they would have no idea as the etymology of the word. Funny things. Amusingly the Japanese also use a lot of french words to describe things surrounding sex and love.
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    (Original post by IcedGreenTea)
    In addition to that :P I think it would be a good idea for those who are already fluent in Japanese to post small sentences, etc. ask non-fluent people to translate it and then correct the responses. I think that only practise and frequent usage can keep things in the memory - and that reading only from textbooks is not sufficient. Besides, there are slangs and phrases that are taught with too much formality in textbooks and which would be silly to use in common day to day conversations.
    I think only Excalibur could be considered fluent in any sense (aka the Nihonjinron sense) although she would probably argue not. :p:

    じゃぁ、外国人は日本語がぺらぺらでも。。。日本人じゃ ないね。:shifty:

    まあ、日本人の友達がいるの?

    Of course I can teach you some slang, but it may be redundant if you don't have a penis. Also don't discount textbook Japanese in some sense. Formality is essential in Japan.
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    おはようございます people!
    little by little I'm improving my Japanese! ;D
    however, I've come across a "problem" with Japanese numbers. which ones are the most used between れい ぜろ 、し よん 、 しち なな 、 く きゅ う 、 じゅうし じゅうよん 、じゅうしち じゅうなな 、 じゅく じゅ うきゅう ?
    also, when talking about dates, can I say the day (Monday, Tuesday, ect..) by only saying or writing 月 火 ect, or do I need to use the complete form 月曜日、火曜日、ect..?
    finally, when talking or writing ordinal numbers, which of the 2 forms of pronounciation for numbers 4, 7 and 9 do I need to use to make it ordinal? (第し or 第よん。。。?)
    thanks again to all of you for the help you are giving me!
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    (Original post by Leonardo85)
    おはようございます people!
    little by little I'm improving my Japanese! ;D
    however, I've come across a "problem" with Japanese numbers. which ones are the most used between れい ぜろ 、し よん 、 しち なな 、 く きゅ う 、 じゅうし じゅうよん 、じゅうしち じゅうなな 、 じゅく じゅ うきゅう ?
    also, when talking about dates, can I say the day (Monday, Tuesday, ect..) by only saying or writing 月 火 ect, or do I need to use the complete form 月曜日、火曜日、ect..?
    finally, when talking or writing ordinal numbers, which of the 2 forms of pronounciation for numbers 4, 7 and 9 do I need to use to make it ordinal? (第し or 第よん。。。?)
    thanks again to all of you for the help you are giving me!
    Hmm, for the majority of the time, the two variations are interchangeable; under some circumstances it may sound more natural to use one form.

    ゼロ is probably more popular, and れい is usually only really used when combined with another word, e.g. れい度 (0ºC). For 9 (and 19), きゅう is more often used than く. For 4 and 7... they're both used, and I don't know if there are any grammatical rules for which to use when. I'd usually go for よん and なな though, particularly when combined (e.g. なな回、よん階、なな番 etc).

    As for dates, it's very common to abbreviate it to 月曜 火曜 etc. Abbreviating further to 月 火 is less so; I'd usually only use it if I'm listing multiple days, e.g. 「数学の授業は月・水・金です。」or 「土日は友達の家に泊まります」etc.

    第よん for 4. For 7 it's interchangeable. For 9 it sounds better to say 第きゅう but 第く wouldn't be wrong.

    This is all just coming from a nuance and what-sounds-right point of view so I'm not sure if there are meant to be any particular rules! Hope that helps anyway.
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    Just in advance: I know how terrible my Japanese is! I'm really sorry if there are any horrible mistakes in the following paragraph! But I always appreciate corrections, it all helps towards improving!!!

    私は一年から日本語を勉強していましたが、日本語の先生が有りません でした。日本語が苦手です。 しかし、上達したいから日本人で話したい。 自分を翻弄されります!(私の大学に留学生がたくさん有 ります!)
 
 
 
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