D&D Religion's "Ask About Sikhism" Thread Watch

USingh
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#401
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Suave, there are some things wiki pages cannot tell you. I don't know if your here to learn or just prove yourself right over everyone else.
Regardless, I'm afraid I won't be replying to any more of your 'questions', sorry.
I can see RSS HSS has already done its damage.

(Original post by tazarooni89)
Ok, so here's my question, correct me if I have any misconceptions...

Guru Nanak is raised in an area with lots of Hindus and Muslims who don't get on so well. When he's a bit older, he disappeared for a while, and people think he drowned. And when he returns, whenever anyone tries to ask him where he's been all this time, he just replies "There is no Hindu, there is no Muslim," and since that day, he starts preaching Sikhism.

So what I want to ask is, what happened to him during the time he went missing? And where did his ideas of Sikhism actually come from?

(This is the part of Sikhism that Wikipedia has no info on :P)
Hi, yeah the wikipedia sikhism section isn't that great, I'd suggest www.sikhism101.com is alot better, just go to the FAQ bit.

To answer your question, basically Guru Nanak Dev Ji went to the eternal court of God, and there God gave gifts to Guru Nanak Dev Ji to give to humanity. These gifts were firstly the true name of God for us to meditate on, and secondly humility. Guru Nanak Dev Ji was given the mission by God to give these to the world to save it. It was during the time Guru Nanak Dev Ji was there that God basically placed everything into Guru Nanak's hands and he was given the highest position. There became no difference between him and God.
About where the ideas of Sikhism come from, in Guru Granth Sahib Ji (our scriptures), the Guru's write quite a few times that it isn't them who are the ones coming up with it, but are writing what God is telling them to. We beleive that the bani (writings) in Guru Granth Sahib Ji are actually eternal truth that has been since the beginning of time, but it just was revealed to the world slowly through the ten Guru's.

Hope that helps let me know if you want to know anything else.
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Suave
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(Original post by USingh)
Suave, there are some things wiki pages cannot tell you. I don't know if your here to learn or just prove yourself right over everyone else.
Regardless, I'm afraid I won't be replying to any more of your 'questions', sorry.
I can see RSS HSS has already done its damage.
As you wish.
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CHAMON
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#403
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(Original post by Suave)
Really? Why does Guru Govind Singh praise Durga Ma (at least allegedly) in in the Chand Di Var?
It's Guru Gobind Singh Ji, not Govind.
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Suave
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#404
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That's what I thought you know.
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milio
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#405
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Why does the Gurudwara, on a purely superficial level look similar to a mosque?
What is the view of alcohol in sikhism?
What language is the Guru Granth Sahib written in. Sanskrit or Punjabi?
What is the structure of the book? Is separated out into chapters?
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USingh
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(Original post by milio)
Why does the Gurudwara, on a purely superficial level look similar to a mosque?
Lol, not sure what you mean by that. Well we think of the Gurus as our Kings, the Gurdwara is meant to be like the Guru's court, so they've been shaped in a way similar to king's courts from the time sikhism started. Though the style of the domes is slightly different between sikh and muslim architecture.

What is the view of alcohol in sikhism?
One of the four worst 'sins' is consumption of any intoxicant, so its a big no no.

What language is the Guru Granth Sahib written in. Sanskrit or Punjabi?
The script in which the bani (hymns) of Guru Granth Sahib Ji is written in is called Gurmukhi, while the language it self is primarily (mostly simple)Panjabi, there are some hymns written in a variety of languages, including sanskrit and also persian, hindi, and more.

What is the structure of the book? Is separated out into chapters?
First, just let you know we don't consider Guru Granth Sahib Ji a book.
Basically Guru Granth Sahib Ji is ALL poetry, and it is poetry written to be sung and to be played alongside instruments. The Guru's were masters of raag (indian musical modes) and its by raags in which Guru Granth Sahib Ji is 'ordered'.

Hope that helps, let me know if you want to know anything else.
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milio
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Thanks for the answers.
So whats the poetry about, are they dialogues between people, parables...
What are the 4 worst sins?
Why is it that many sikhs and hindus drink, particularly in the youth (UK). Do you blame the university culture or are there other reasons.
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USingh
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(Original post by milio)
Thanks for the answers.
So whats the poetry about, are they dialogues between people, parables...
Basically we believe its the eternal word of God and although we do say it was written by the Gurus and some saints, in reality its not written by any of them, just revealed through them. It wouldn't be possible to pin down what Guru Granth Sahib Ji is about, the most important thing is that it is praise of Vaheguru (God), teaches you the way to God and inspires you to actually do that, makes you realise what bad state you are in and makes you realise the seperation between you and God, tells you what God is like and why you need him, etc. its hard to just summarise Gurbani, for me its the answer to everything! lol.
What are the 4 worst sins?
Like you already know theres taking intoxicants,
cutting any hair,
eating meat,
relationships with anyone other than one's spouse (this includes pre-marital relationships).

Why is it that many sikhs and hindus drink, particularly in the youth (UK). Do you blame the university culture or are there other reasons.
Well personally from what I have seen it seems a big part of Panjabi culture to drink (whiskey seems to be a fav!), its quite ridiculous the extent to which some take it. Just have a look at all the bhangra songs obsessed with alcohol, so thats one reason. And like you said, yeah there really is alot more drinking culture in the UK, no doubt about it, thats not just asians but everyone really. My opinion anyway.
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milio
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The last point is quite interesting. I dont like judging, but is seems very odd that there is meat and alcohol served at punjabi weddings, given its such a sacred occasion
Do you think that its possible to reinstate traditional sikh values into todays youth, or does sikhism teach that only God can judge every individual. I know that we have all done wrong in the eyes of god, but is it not better to try and lead others into a better way of living. Are there any youth schools or clubs for sick children in the UK?
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USingh
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You see, like I said the whole problem arises from the large number of panjabis who regard themselves as part of the Sikh faith. Meat and alcohol are pretty big parts of panjabi culture, while on the other hand they are completely forbidden in sikhism. This is where it seems alot of panjabis choose panjabi culture over religion. However, those that are truly religious abstain from all such things at all times. There are some VERY religious sikhs here and the number of them is growing by the day. I know plenty of sikhs who are not even holding parties after the religious ceremony, but actually going for an all night prayer at the Gurdwara instead!
There are indeed many great events held for youths, two fantastic summer camps (Sikhi camp and Khalsa Camp/ are held yearly for over 16s, there are also plenty of younger kids camps and workships held throughout the year, not to mention the huge sikh primary school recently built in slough (something like £7 million to build!).

You have to remember that the Sikh community in britian is still relatively young, its taking its time to develop. When most of the first generation immigrants came they had to put religion far behind them (removing their turbans and beards to get jobs, for example), though now as the community is more established, the younger generation now has better oppurtunities, etc. there is now more of a chance to actually spend time on projects such as the above and think about the true message.
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Charzhino
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#411
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Im pretty sure meat is allowed to be eaten by Sikhs at their own choosing. I am a Sikh and eat meat and there isn't any direct verse that condems people from eating it.

Just got this from SikhiWiki:

When a Sikh gets baptised, he or she is strictly required to refrain from the following actions:

1. Cutting or trimming of any hair,
2. Fornication or adultery,
3. Eating of meat or flesh of an animal slaughtered in a slow and painful manner; kutta or halal meat of the Muslim tradition or kosher meat of the Jewish tradition. Both methods require a slow and seemingly cruel death as the throat of an animal is slit while the two religions' prayers are said over the frightened animal by the Muslim or Jewish butcher, as its life giving blood (considered ritualy unclean) is drained away.
4. Any use of any tobacco product.


Any Halal or Kosher meat is forbidden, not meat in general, am I right?
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_H_
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(Original post by Charzhino)
Im pretty sure meat is allowed to be eaten by Sikhs at their own choosing. I am a Sikh and eat meat and there isn't any direct verse that condems people from eating it.

Just got this from SikhiWiki:

When a Sikh gets baptised, he or she is strictly required to refrain from the following actions:

1. Cutting or trimming of any hair,
2. Fornication or adultery,
3. Eating of meat or flesh of an animal slaughtered in a slow and painful manner; kutta or halal meat of the Muslim tradition or kosher meat of the Jewish tradition. Both methods require a slow and seemingly cruel death as the throat of an animal is slit while the two religions' prayers are said over the frightened animal by the Muslim or Jewish butcher, as its life giving blood (considered ritualy unclean) is drained away.
4. Any use of any tobacco product.


Any Halal or Kosher meat is forbidden, not meat in general, am I right?
those are the 4 cardinal sins.
it isnt just tobacco, this includes any kind of intoxicant (alcohol, drugs etc)
the meat issue has been discussed a few pages back, have a look and if you still don't agree then thats fine-agree to disagree

(Original post by milio)
Thanks for the answers.
So whats the poetry about, are they dialogues between people, parables...
just another random thought that may be of interest..
when reciting Gurbani, we often notice that the verses address God (Waheguru) directly, so we're basically having a direct conversation with our Creator.
an example:
raakh pithaa prabh maerae ||
Save me, O My Father God.

mohi niragun sabh gun thaerae ||1|| rehaao ||
I am worthless and without virtue; all virtues are Yours. ||1||Pause||
http://www.sikhitothemax.com/page.asp?ShabadID=645
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USingh
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(Original post by Charzhino)
Im pretty sure meat is allowed to be eaten by Sikhs at their own choosing. I am a Sikh and eat meat and there isn't any direct verse that condems people from eating it.
Kabeer, the dinner of beans and rice is excellent, if it is flavored with salt.
Who would cut his throat, to have meat with his bread? ||188||
-1374

have a read of this: http://www.sikhism101.com/node/77

Just got this from SikhiWiki:

When a Sikh gets baptised, he or she is strictly required to refrain from the following actions:

1. Cutting or trimming of any hair,
2. Fornication or adultery,
3. Eating of meat or flesh of an animal slaughtered in a slow and painful manner; kutta or halal meat of the Muslim tradition or kosher meat of the Jewish tradition. Both methods require a slow and seemingly cruel death as the throat of an animal is slit while the two religions' prayers are said over the frightened animal by the Muslim or Jewish butcher, as its life giving blood (considered ritualy unclean) is drained away.
4. Any use of any tobacco product.


Any Halal or Kosher meat is forbidden, not meat in general, am I right?
When you go to take amrit, 99.99% of Panj Pyare say you can't eat ANY meat, its a teeny minority who say Guru Ji said its ok. Basically they say that when Guru Gobind Singh Ji not to eat 'Kuta', it only meant Halal/ritually slaughtered meat. However its been proved linguistically that kuta simply means something that has been slaughtered.

edith _H_ beat me too it lol
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CHAMON
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BTW Kuta word does not exist in the SGGS, it's been introduced later into Sikhism for some bizzare reason.
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med_lion
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#415
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sup people didnt know they had this thread here

anyway would just like to clarify a few things i have seen in the previous 20 pages lol ^^

The true Sikh greeting is "Waheguru Ji Ka Khalsa, Waheguru Ji Ki Fateh"

Someone had asked whether Sikhs are buried or cremated...well Sri Guru Nanak Dev Ji said that when a person dies who cares about the body. It is the inner immortal soul that leaves the body and takes form in another. So it doesnt really matter if the bpdy is cremated or buired. You could say its more of a cultural thing.

I must stress that Sikhism is more of a way of life than a religion.
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USingh
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VJKK VJKF Singh :gthumb:

Yeah maryada (Guru's code of conduct) states that there is no set requirement on how to dispose of the body, but cremation is encouraged as with burying there is the temptation to set up a monument and keep visiting it which is not good, that also means no keeping of ashes. But yeah, burying or any other way is fine as well.
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med_lion
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VJKK VJKF paaji

I have seen many people here say "why Sikhs keep long hair"...i must say it is scientifically proven that it is beneficial for the body. We as Sikhs believe in One Supreme God and me, being someone who reads Sri Guru Granth Sahib, has read that Guru Nanak briefly states what God looks like from Guru Nanak's description and long hair is mentioned. However, we strongly believe that God is formless `but can` take form of anything he wishes.

Bhul Chuk Maaf
Waheguroo Jee Ka Khalsa!
Waheguroo Jee Kee Fateh!!
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USingh
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#418
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Happy Gurpurb to all sikhs on here, first parkash of Aad Granth Sahib Ji at Darbar Sahib Amritsar
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med_lion
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#419
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#419
To you too, my friend :P
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_H_
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#420
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#420
ill third that- Happy Gurpurab!
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