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    (Original post by Ratchit99)
    So today is the first day when ive actively wonderwd whether im able to do this.
    My dreaded y7s were a total screw up again this week. I got pulled up on differentiation, progression and how i explained the subject to the group. This in turn meant my mentor said there could be questions over my subject knowledge. I dont know, its just made me doubt myself and whether im capable of doing this or whether i should just go back to my office job
    Please don't think that you shouldn't be doing this job. Like someone else said, you are only 2 months into training. Believe me, you will have moments where you think you can't do it - I'm an NQT and even now I doubt myself and think I'm doing a rubbish job. You will learn so much on your first placement and you will come on in leaps and bounds in your second placement. That's what happened with me! First placement is for making these mistakes so you don't make them again. Don't lose faith! x

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    Thanks guys,, i know its just about making the mistakes and learning as you said, i just feel so rubbish when i screw up a lesson and then feel like the class is super behind! My mentor has offered to go through my lesson plans for my two classes that ive taken over from her on so that we can talk stuff through and get it clear in my head, but everytime this lesson goes wrong (as it seems to every other week for some reason or other) i lose a little more confidence in myself!
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    I've been teaching for three decades. I still have lessons which don't go right. Sometimes it's just one of those things. Even a windy day can change the mood of the kids. However, what experience will give you is the knowledge to turn it round, to know what is a non-starter from the outset, and not to mind all that much if you have one bad lesson because the majority of the time it's all fine. Don't expect to have all this from the word go. If you look back on your first attempts at tying your shoelaces, you probably didn't get it right and now you don't even think about it. Be a bit kind to yourself.
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    I agree with everyone. Don't let it stop you. It's really hard though because I feel the same. I get zero positive feedback, and I find it hard to be optimistic when it's like that. I just wish I'd have a shred of praise to keep me going.

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    (Original post by Airfairy)
    I just wish I'd have a shred of praise to keep me going.
    My secret informant told me you are fab.

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    That was supposed to make you smile but actually sounds creepy.
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    (Original post by Airfairy)
    I agree with everyone. Don't let it stop you. It's really hard though because I feel the same. I get zero positive feedback, and I find it hard to be optimistic when it's like that. I just wish I'd have a shred of praise to keep me going.

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    Fairy i know exactly what you mean, i know we need to learn from our mistakes but most of my feedback is my mistakes not the stuff i do good so im having to think about that myself.
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    (Original post by Airfairy)
    I agree with everyone. Don't let it stop you. It's really hard though because I feel the same. I get zero positive feedback, and I find it hard to be optimistic when it's like that. I just wish I'd have a shred of praise to keep me going.

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    (Original post by Ratchit99)
    Fairy i know exactly what you mean, i know we need to learn from our mistakes but most of my feedback is my mistakes not the stuff i do good so im having to think about that myself.
    It's crazy that as teachers or ex teachers these people presumably know that to only give negative feedback to a pupil would be very unproductive. Yes help them find ways to improve but also praise their efforts and point out their successes. Yet it comes to student teachers and they forget that the same still applies!

    I had a different experience and I wonder if it was because my teachers and mentors worked with very young children so were even more focused on the positive, and that came across? Don't get me wrong I had bad feedback and lessons which they said just were bad all over but it was always in a supportive way and always working from what I knew anyway, plus they almost always picked out positives too.

    Xxx

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    Today my mentor said she'd told one of the classes I teach I was a trainee teacher, she said "they've caught on.." implying how rubbish I was and I was thinking in my head, you could have covered it up or made excuses, now I'm gonna be their new target "how far can I push her, she's not even a real teacher". Then went onto say how boring my lessons were and how I must cater for the highest and lowest ability, make sure they absorb what they're supposed to, learn their names, cater to their personalities, and all the while this must be fun too - I feel like I could jump though fire and it wouldn't be enough.

    So downtrodden tbh, feel like im at the lowest of low, i spent my free period crying in the toilets - it's not so much what she said, it's the not caring part "here's your problem, go fix it, don't ask me, i'm too busy but it better be fixed by next time".
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    (Original post by Sam89)
    Today my mentor said she'd told one of the classes I teach I was a trainee teacher, she said "they've caught on.." implying how rubbish I was and I was thinking in my head, you could have covered it up or made excuses, now I'm gonna be their new target "how far can I push her, she's not even a real teacher". Then went onto say how boring my lessons were and how I must cater for the highest and lowest ability, make sure they absorb what they're supposed to, learn their names, cater to their personalities, and all the while this must be fun too - I feel like I could jump though fire and it wouldn't be enough.

    So downtrodden tbh, feel like im at the lowest of low, i spent my free period crying in the toilets - it's not so much what she said, it's the not caring part "here's your problem, go fix it, don't ask me, i'm too busy but it better be fixed by next time".
    Talk to someone, there is a difference between constructive criticism and cruel to be kind etc- and undermining your confidence without providing any real support or advice. I started a Degree with QTS when i was 18, and my mentor was exactly like this. I can take criticism and welcome advice for change and honesty; but she was horrible all the time without offering any support. I dropped out instead of talking to someone and i still regret it years on. Are you going a pgce? Talk to someone at uni to see what you can do, i appreciate it is an awkward and horrible situation, but you are still training and deserve better.
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    (Original post by Ratchit99)
    Thanks guys,, i know its just about making the mistakes and learning as you said, i just feel so rubbish when i screw up a lesson and then feel like the class is super behind! My mentor has offered to go through my lesson plans for my two classes that ive taken over from her on so that we can talk stuff through and get it clear in my head, but everytime this lesson goes wrong (as it seems to every other week for some reason or other) i lose a little more confidence in myself!

    I had a really bad start to the day. My USB which contained my lesson plan was corrupted, the school experienced an Internet breakdown and I had a double year 8 on the first two periods. It can't get that bad. Guess what? I actually did much better than I thought. Of course I have things I need to improve on. But, it's my first placement and I'm here to learn my craft.
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    Started placement yesterday in a year 2 class, going pretty well so far though I can't help thinking 'I wouldn't do this if this were my class'. Everyone's pedagogy is different and I think that is half the battle of getting through placement. You have to juggle what you want to do/implement and what is already in place/what the kids get from their 'normal' teacher.

    Best of luck everyone! We wouldn't be on the course if they didn't think we could do it, that tends to get me through the week!
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    Sorry to gatecrash the thread guys but wondered if you might be able to help with my question below...... Thanks


    I had an informal interview today with one of the school direct schools I applied to.....

    The deputy head that I met informed me that the employment contract runs from September - June (which I was aware of) so that you can start at a new school (if necessary) before the summer). That made sense but since I've come home, I've been having a look on the net and it seems the norm is to give only a 0.7/0.8 fte contract meaning you don't actually get paid the salary that the DofE promote as they don't pay you for your study days?

    Can anyone confirm or clarify this? If that's the case then it's about £5k less than what's advertised
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    (Original post by Mr M)
    My secret informant told me you are fab.

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    That was supposed to make you smile but actually sounds creepy.
    Haha, this did make me laugh. Thank you. :lol:

    (Original post by Ratchit99)
    Fairy i know exactly what you mean, i know we need to learn from our mistakes but most of my feedback is my mistakes not the stuff i do good so im having to think about that myself.
    Yeah, it is difficult. Do you have any feedback sheets you can give to your mentor? I gave mine to my mentor for the first time today, and they have boxes on where they list advantages. This means they sort of have to think of something, even if they are grasping.
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    (Original post by Airfairy)
    Haha, this did make me laugh. Thank you. :lol:



    Yeah, it is difficult. Do you have any feedback sheets you can give to your mentor? I gave mine to my mentor for the first time today, and they have boxes on where they list advantages. This means they sort of have to think of something, even if they are grasping.
    Ah, no we dont have anything like that, just our official observation forms for when theyre doing a formal observation. I usually sit down with the teacher afterwards and have a quick discussion ( or if its my mentor generally a more in depth discussion) about how the lesson went, what i need to work on, how to deal with specific issues, what they need to progress to next lesson etc
    I like your idea though!
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    Someone remind me why I am putting myself through this again. I feel like dropping out and being a Cover Supervisor. Arrrrgh!
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    I think the way the observation forms were done on my PGCE was really helpful for making sure you got positive feedback.

    The main part of the form was just space for the observer to make notes and say how they related to the teaching standards (by putting T + number in the right-hand column). The idea was that then you had lots of evidence towards the standards. At the bottom they had to do 3 targets so the rest of the form was all positive, even if it meant them listing the basics.

    eg:
    -Objectives and starter on board at start - T4 (plan and teach well-structured lessons).
    -Pupils picked with random name generator to answer questions - T6 (AfL).
    -Clear 5-minute time-limit given - T4.
    -Extension task provided for more able pupils - T5 (differentiation)
    -Teacher uses behaviour system (verbal warning) for a disruptive pupil - T7 (behaviour management).


    It could be worth asking your tutor outright if they think you're awful and are going to fail. Obviously if the answer is yes that would be rubbish, but you're better off knowing. And most of the time the answer will be no, they probably just haven't realised how negative they're making you feel. I had this problem on my 2nd placement and they said they were generally very happy with me (ie: I was pretty good for a student teacher, in their opinion) but had just been focusing on what I needed to improve.

    Then you could ask them to bullet point examples towards the teacher standards (as above) so that you can use them as evidence for the university. They will be useful when doing your evidence record forms and also get you some more positive feedback.
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    (Original post by camcam88)
    Someone remind me why I am putting myself through this again. I feel like dropping out and being a Cover Supervisor. Arrrrgh!
    What is a cover supervisor and why does everyone always refer to that as their back up plan? We have a woman who deals with cover in our school but she's a teacher too so a PGCE is still needed.

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    (Original post by Airfairy)
    What is a cover supervisor and why does everyone always refer to that as their back up plan? We have a woman who deals with cover in our school but she's a teacher too so a PGCE is still needed.

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    No, cover supervisors do not have to be qualified teachers (as they are paid much less, more like a TA). In fact, there are no real qualification requirements all though many CSs are graduates gaining experience before applying for a PGCE.

    In my school none of the CSs are qualified teachers, they have mostly worked as TAs in the school or supported with behaviour for a while and have then moved on to covering lessons.

    The difference is that you are not expected to plan lessons or have the subject knowledge to deliver them, you just supervise pupils to complete work set by the absent teacher and help as best you can.

    I was a cover supervisor (day-to-day agency work) before my PGCE and it's a tough job although I imagine it gets easier if you manage to get a permanent job in a school as the pupils get to know you and not just see you as this random outsider who doesn't know how their school works.
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    (Original post by RachelFiveee)
    Talk to someone, there is a difference between constructive criticism and cruel to be kind etc- and undermining your confidence without providing any real support or advice. I started a Degree with QTS when i was 18, and my mentor was exactly like this. I can take criticism and welcome advice for change and honesty; but she was horrible all the time without offering any support. I dropped out instead of talking to someone and i still regret it years on. Are you going a pgce? Talk to someone at uni to see what you can do, i appreciate it is an awkward and horrible situation, but you are still training and deserve better.
    I think I will speak to my tutor at uni, I can't carry on crying through the days, getting virtually no sleep through the night and waking up in panic attacks. But then I'm also thinking will it cause more harm than good? Should I suck it up for the next 8 or so weeks...? Hmm

    I keep thinking to myself, if I ever ever have the opportunity to mentor a trainee teacher - I wouldn't make them feel so low and like a third wheel, I wouldn't ignore their existence and I wouldn't undermine their authority in front of the students - isn't that all common courtesy and common sense though?

    I see my mentor being ever so nice to those who can do 'stuff' for her and are in higher positions - but if you can't offer her anything, you don't exist in her world.
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    (Original post by Sam89)
    I think I will speak to my tutor at uni, I can't carry on crying through the days, getting virtually no sleep through the night and waking up in panic attacks. But then I'm also thinking will it cause more harm than good? Should I suck it up for the next 8 or so weeks...? Hmm

    I keep thinking to myself, if I ever ever have the opportunity to mentor a trainee teacher - I wouldn't make them feel so low and like a third wheel, I wouldn't ignore their existence and I wouldn't undermine their authority in front of the students - isn't that all common courtesy and common sense though?

    I see my mentor being ever so nice to those who can do 'stuff' for her and are in higher positions - but if you can't offer her anything, you don't exist in her world.
    Talk to the person at UNI. They want you to pass, it looks really **** on them if they have failing teachers. They should and will do everything they can to help you in the situation you're in.
 
 
 
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