Turn on thread page Beta
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by snowdoe)
    Warwick or Bristol?
    Everyone on here has got to stop answering these questions😂 As sad before by many others, chose the one that is best for you
    Offline

    7
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by snowdoe)
    Warwick or Bristol?
    Definitely Bristol for law. Excellent reputation with MC firms.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by snowdoe)
    Warwick or Bristol?
    (Original post by Cholesta)
    Definitely Bristol for law. Excellent reputation with MC firms.
    I chose Warwick. I needed a program that would allow me to refine other skill sets and interest. Because I'm more interested in policy, a contextual approach is superior to a black letter one. Some of the extracurricular opportunities seem incredible.

    My point being, know thyself . Know what you want, and what can offer it.
    Offline

    5
    ReputationRep:
    Warwick or SOAS - my work colleague is asking, is a 2006 grad but thinking of doing 2nd degree in law this year 2016 entry.
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    As above - make the decision yourself. There is no 'right' answer as everyone has different needs, interests etc. What one person thinks is amazing, another won't. And rankings are most definitely a totally mindless way to choose a Uni.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    Making it official tomorrow...

    Firming Warwick, insuring York.
    Rejecting Exeter and Birmingham
    Offline

    7
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by *Stefan*)
    It is neither more reputable nor has better networking connections with MC firms. If anything, Durham completely overcame UCL in terms of trainees in firms, despite UCL's almost double size.

    Internationally, perhaps yeah, nationally, not at all.

    Posted from TSR Mobile

    Hey - how do you find out the numbers of graduates from a particular uni are taken on as trainees by firms? I see a lot of people saying xyz firms take from more trainees from abc universities, but not sure how people are coming to such a conclusion.

    In case it's a daft question because it's from the chambers student link referenced - the link gives me an error message, so I can't see what that says!
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by stratagems)
    Hey - how do you find out the numbers of graduates from a particular uni are taken on as trainees by firms? I see a lot of people saying xyz firms take from more trainees from abc universities, but not sure how people are coming to such a conclusion.

    In case it's a daft question because it's from the chambers student link referenced - the link gives me an error message, so I can't see what that says!
    Here's the chamber student figures

    Universities themselves also list where their trainees go on their prospectuses (although rarely precise figures)

    LinkedIn is also great to see exactly what trainees have studied and where

    Offline

    7
    ReputationRep:
    Cheers!
    It's quite interesting that a) there's no information about the intake of law undergraduates at each university (to give a sense of proportionality) and b) it doesn't correlate with many of the rankings. So in essence, guessing it's not that helpful just like the rankings!

    Have checked LinkedIn - I end up spending soooo much time just on one firm in order to get a large enough sample to see any kind of correlation!
    Offline

    7
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by JNDSAN)
    I dont think anyone said that: i do law at UCL and there's networking events every week and from the people i've spoken to at Linklaters, A and A, S and May etc they've said they do prefer LSE, UCL and Kings to Durham.
    Yeah - the Law Soc does tend to emphasise the weekly Monday networking events A LOT. That said, a lot of the members who did the offer holders day presentations seem to have gained a traineeship at MC firms.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    I have just read your comments on this thread as i was replying to your comment and you are clearly pro durham so maybe instead of shouting propagandaesc **** say the truth.

    Durham law school takes in 200 undergraduates a year and 120 postgraduates where as UCL take in 175 undergraduates a year and around 150 postgraduates....
    Offline

    7
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by UKStudent2016)
    Got rejection from all 5 choices re M100 LLB Law. A bit perplexed and baffled as my tutor and others were predicting I would have got an offer based on what I have. I think it's possibly down to LNAT due to my low score of 13, which was due to my misunderstanding of the computerised system and I missed a complete section out. Never sat in a computerised test. It's a pity that as a mature student in early 40s with wealth of experience in fields of both practical and academic areas (e.g. work demanded to comply professional research reports for corporations and gov etc), I couldn't make it through. Certainly my employer wouldn't be impressed, given they would have sponsored for the entire programme, as the degree is closely connected to my area of profession. Sadly my sponsor would only pay to study law at selected unis.

    For us older people it takes time to get used to knowing the computerised testing system that seems more like a computer game that comes with time pressure which is probably more suited to 17-18 yrs old teenagers than us mature students who likes to take step back and look at the bigger picture. (I can't compete to play time testing new games apps with my child (which I found LNAT computerised system to be like) but can prepare deadline complex driven reports and presentations for large government depts and corporations. Sad that such skills is less relevant than being coached into jailbreaking the technical software driven LNAT tests.

    I acknowledge I could be alone in such views /and or could be wrong but thought there's no harm in expressing it.

    Have to resort to Open Uni or ULaw as other unis would prove to be too expensive since their programmes won't be sponsored and I don't see its worth taking a career break from work and pay the fees which would prove too costly.
    (Despite being a UK citizen I wouldn't qualify for student finance due to personal circumstances).

    :-(

    Hi - I'm a mature student nearing my 30s, so I'd say I'm aged around the mid-point between you and 18 year old college/sixth formers. I understand that you're frustrated, but there's no point for two reasons. One - it's just how it is and the LNAT isn't going away any time soon. Two - I'm in a similar position and I don't consider myself an exception, so there's no reason why you can't do it too! FWIW, I got 27 on my LNAT and ran out of time so I missed the last topic the last set of questions were focused on (I think there were around 5).

    The computerised test does *not* require knowledge of using computers beyond basic knowledge! It's literally ticking a box and clicking 'next' for the most part - if you've done any kind of survey online, you'll be familiar with the format.

    In terms of the content, it tests your application of logic via your ability to make dedications and inferences. It's almost a 'common sense' / 'what makes the most sense' scenario. The second part is the essay and this doesn't require any particular IT skills either beyond what you're already probably familiar with!

    Consequently, it doesn't really require practise to get used to the format or to check your understanding/use of logic. I bought three LNAT test books, but they were so big & overwhelming that I didn't end up opening them. TO ANYONE WORRIED ABOUT THE LNAT: YOU DO NOT NEED TO PRACTISE FOR IT. That doesn't mean you shouldn't practise and/or that practising doesn't help!

    I did, however, check out the LNAT practise test on the website the morning of my LNAT exam (on the last day it was possible to sit it) and possibly the night before. I winged it basically!

    I was working full time OR working part time (evenings & weekends) AND studying 3 A Levels during the day and into the other evenings when I wasn't working. I say this to give you perspective. I didn't make time for it, but it is possible to set aside an hour even if it's a single weekend in the entire year. I know I could have, but ultimately chose not to.

    I'm adept at giving presentations and preparing complex reports having worked for many years, but that doesn't necessarily require the use of logic. Work vs LNAT utilise different skills and abilities and there is a place for you to convey other skills to admissions team - via your personal statement. As a mature student, you need to be able to explain why you've returned to studying AND why you've chosen that subject, unlike sixth formers. I used my PS to illustrate how the skills I've gained in my employment are transferable to studying and also to law. The LNAT doesn't replace that or counteract your existing skill set - it's just one of many means of discriminating between candidates with similar profiles.

    I don't think you should be dejected - it gives you an idea of where there's room for improvement. If you've hit rock bottom, the only place you can go is up! So, take the time to go through a LNAT practise book for 10 minutes each day and/or practise the mock LNAT that's online and/or the LSAT (US equivalent, which is also online) to familiarise yourself under timed conditions, especially as missing an entire section will impact your score a fair bit. Then, try again for 2017 entry.

    Also, if you have a degree already, check with your employers if they'd consider funding a GDL - it's cheaper and less of a time commitment so that's beneficial to them twice over.
    Online

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by stratagems)
    Yeah - the Law Soc does tend to emphasise the weekly Monday networking events A LOT. That said, a lot of the members who did the offer holders day presentations seem to have gained a traineeship at MC firms.
    He's speaking a load of crap. Firms would never say which universities they prefer to an applicant at a uni fair. Let's be serious here.
    Online

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by stratagems)
    Cheers!
    It's quite interesting that a) there's no information about the intake of law undergraduates at each university (to give a sense of proportionality) and b) it doesn't correlate with many of the rankings. So in essence, guessing it's not that helpful just like the rankings!

    Have checked LinkedIn - I end up spending soooo much time just on one firm in order to get a large enough sample to see any kind of correlation!
    You can check the 'proportionality' on your own, of course. Remember that it's not only law students getting into - all subjects are equally acceptable, and about 40-50% of London firms recruit non-law students.

    But indeed, it should be a general guide, not taken as if it's 100% elucidating.
    Offline

    7
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by *Stefan*)
    You can check the 'proportionality' on your own, of course. Remember that it's not only law students getting into - all subjects are equally acceptable, and about 40-50% of London firms recruit non-law students.

    But indeed, it should be a general guide, not taken as if it's 100% elucidating.
    Agree with both posts - an additional factor is the number of law undergrads going for the BPTC. All of these rankings provide a good overall picture, but they're not reliable.
    Offline

    5
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by JNDSAN)
    I dont think anyone said that: i do law at UCL and there's networking events every week and from the people i've spoken to at Linklaters, A and A, S and May etc they've said they do prefer LSE, UCL and Kings to Durham.
    It's fine for law grads to aim for a career in law but to base the reason for law degree and unis solely for the sake of MC firms/in the city, as it seems to be the case, does look a bit strange when there are many other areas of law. City/MC law firms operate in just one niche area, mainly in the corporate and financial areas of law. If it's just because of the pay, then it seems the law degree is driven by pecuniary reasons.....unless I'm outdated and too slow in catching up with current the trend.
    Offline

    5
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by stratagems)
    Yeah - the Law Soc does tend to emphasise the weekly Monday networking events A LOT. That said, a lot of the members who did the offer holders day presentations seem to have gained a traineeship at MC firms.
    It's fine for law grads to aim for a career in law but to base the reason for law degree and unis solely for the sake of MC firms/in the city, as it seems to be the case, does look a bit strange when there are many other areas of law. City/MC law firms operate in just one niche area, mainly in the corporate and financial areas of law. If it's just because of the pay, then it seems the law degree is driven by pecuniary reasons.....unless I'm outdated and too slow in catching up with current the trend.
    Offline

    7
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by UKStudent2016)
    It's fine for law grads to aim for a career in law but to base the reasons for law degree and unis solely for the sake of MC firms/in the city, as it seems to be the case, does look a bit strange when there are many other areas of law. City/MC law firms operate in just one niche area, mainly in the corporate and financial areas of law. It if its just because of the pay, then it seems the law degree is driven by pecuniary reasons.....unless I'm outdated and too slow in catching up with current the trend.
    I was replying specifically about UCL, not any other law course! UCL emphasises it's networking and links with MC and US firms, plus members of the judiciary and bar sets, hence why I referred to MC destinations. It doesn't mean anything to anyone bar those considering UCL as a uni and even then isn't that significant.
    Offline

    5
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by stratagems)
    Hi - I'm a mature student nearing my 30s, so I'd say I'm aged around the mid-point between you and 18 year old college/sixth formers. I understand that you're frustrated, but there's no point for two reasons. One - it's just how it is and the LNAT isn't going away any time soon. Two - I'm in a similar position and I don't consider myself an exception, so there's no reason why you can't do it too! FWIW, I got 27 on my LNAT and ran out of time so I missed the last set of questions (I think there were around 5-10).

    The computerised test does *not* require knowledge of using computers beyond basic knowledge! It's literally ticking a box and clicking 'next' for the most part - if you've done any kind of survey online, you'll be familiar with the format.

    In terms of the content, it tests your application of logic via your ability to make dedications and inferences. This doesn't require any particular practise - it's almost a 'common sense' / 'what makes the most sense' scenario. The second part is the essay and this doesn't require any particular IT skills either beyond what you're already probably familiar with!

    Consequently, it doesn't really require practise to get used to the format or to check your understanding/use of logic. I bought three LNAT test books, but they were so big & overwhelming that I didn't end up opening them. TO ANYONE WORRIED ABOUT THE LNAT: YOU DO NOT NEED TO PRACTISE FOR IT. That doesn't mean you shouldn't or that it doesn't help!

    I did, however, check out the LNAT practise test on the website the morning of my LNAT exam (on the last day it was possible to sit it) and possibly the night before. I winged it basically!

    I was working full time AND studying 3 A Levels AND have additional caring responsibilities at home. My day started at 6am and 3x week, I got home at 10pm from evening classes. I then started daytime classes + 1 evening class and got a part-time evening & weekend job. I say this to give you perspective. I didn't make time for it, but it is possible to set aside an hour even if it's a single weekend in the entire year. I know I could have, but ultimately chose not to.

    I'm adept at giving presentations and preparing complex reports having worked for many years, but that doesn't necessarily require the use of logic. Work vs LNAT utilise different skills and abilities and there is a place for you to convey other skills to admissions team - via your personal statement. As a mature student, you need to be able to explain why you've returned to studying AND why you've chosen that subject, unlike sixth formers. I used my PS to illustrate how the skills I've gained in my employment are transferable to studying and also to law. The LNAT doesn't replace that or counteract your existing skill set - it's just one of many means of discriminating between candidates with similar profiles.

    I don't think you should be dejected - it gives you an idea of where there's room for improvement. If you've hit rock bottom, the only place you can go is up! So, take the time to go through a LNAT practise book for 10 minutes each day and/or practise the mock LNAT that's online and/or the LSAT (US equivalent, which is also online) to familiarise yourself under timed conditions, especially as missing an entire section will impact your score a fair bit. Then, try again for 2017 entry.

    Also, if you have a degree already, check with your employers if they'd consider funding a GDL - it's cheaper and less of a time commitment so that's beneficial to them twice over.
    Many thanks for your kind inspiration. You truly should be a motivational speaker and reallty admire your adeptation through challenging circumstances. I agree with the points mentioned. And its most likely got to do with me not being fast paced enough with the demands of modern testing systems such as LNAT. I guess in my case, practice should have been more of a priority if my common sense isn't upto scratch.

    I plan to do a self-funded law degree through Open Uni or Uni of Law from this Sept. Birkbeck is an option but haven't decided yet as it would be expensive/not funded by employer.
    I did thought about GDL but A, wouldn't suit the American employer's niche profession (also at some point may need to be a qualified or specialise in US/New York laws of securities and sanctions hence GDL wouldn't suite or meet the needs).

    The other spanner of confusion has been thrown in by the fact that UCL, though rejecting me for Law, but may consider me for History/Anthropology and LSE may consider me for social policy & government through UCAS extra so it seems those rejected for law may be offered other degrees with the hope of doing GDL later, in which case I'm not in favour/doesn't apply to me.

    In all case, I hope I would enjoy wherever I start, be it with Open Uni or Uni of Law or Birkbeck, though the latter seems unlikely due to evening timing.
    Offline

    5
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by stratagems)
    I was replying specifically about UCL, not any other law course! UCL emphasises it's networking and links with MC and US firms, plus members of the judiciary and bar sets, hence why I referred to MC destinations. It doesn't mean anything to anyone bar those considering UCL as a uni and even then isn't that significant.
    Apologies for misunderstanding....shows I'm a bit too slow in catching up, Lol
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
Turn on thread page Beta
Updated: November 12, 2016

University open days

  1. University of Edinburgh
    All Departments Undergraduate
    Sat, 22 Sep '18
  2. University of Exeter
    Undergraduate Open Days - Penryn Campus Undergraduate
    Sat, 22 Sep '18
  3. Loughborough University
    General Open Day Undergraduate
    Sat, 22 Sep '18
Poll
Which accompaniment is best?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.