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Which graduates are most likely to make 50k+ in their careers? watch

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    Architect.
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    (Original post by trustmeimlying1)
    not a bad way to live..I just hope yeh get a job...
    Thanks, same out to you.

    For now, I'm pretty sure I don't want a family for at least 15 years so it's not as if I'll have children to support. If I was planning on having a proper family early on then I would be a bit worried.
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    (Original post by Key123)
    Not many lawyers earn that kind of money within 6 years of starting their degree though.


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    Which is why I said the Big time lawyers, aka big london firms
    Dentistry isn't comparable to any other profession in the way we're paid and we practice. After our training year we have to pay for our surgery's expenses, pay the salary of our nurses etc.
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    (Original post by Temporality)
    Thanks, same out to you.

    For now, I'm pretty sure I don't want a family for at least 15 years so it's not as if I'll have children to support. If I was planning on having a proper family early on then I would be a bit worried.
    hmm families dont work like that
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    (Original post by MichelBraga)
    Law, Economics, IR, Maths
    IR stands for...?:confused:
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    (Original post by Wisefire)
    Wow. That's actually pretty damn good (those particular prospects).

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    I know, my aim is to land myself a job in one of this places, its possible if you're on track for 2.1 and you have 340 + ucas points with relevant work experience and passion for your job

    Posted from TSR Mobile
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    (Original post by anthemofjo)
    IR stands for...?:confused:
    International Relations
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    (Original post by MichelBraga)
    International Relations
    I assumed so.
    Care to elaborate?
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    (Original post by anthemofjo)
    I assumed so.
    Care to elaborate?
    With the globalization and the growth of multinational companies, IR graduates became important in major business strategies, so, nowadays they are one of highest payrolls in companies. After graduation, the average winning for an IR graduate is about 27k for initial salary. IR graduates easily reach 50k before their 40s.
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    (Original post by MichelBraga)
    With the globalization and the growth of multinational companies, IR graduates became important in major business strategies, so, nowadays they are one of highest payrolls in companies. After graduation, the average winning for an IR graduate is about 27k for initial salary. IR graduates easily reach 50k before their 40s.
    Ah-huh.
    I suppose you are by chance IR graduate and speaking from your personal experience?
    Because it is certainly not what I have heard.
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    (Original post by anthemofjo)
    Ah-huh.
    I suppose you are by chance IR graduate and speaking from your personal experience?
    Because it is certainly not what I have heard.
    Haha, yeah very good chance that poster studied/studies IR, because the kind of jobs they get will never specify we want someone who studied "international relations", they will take from a range of degrees, possibly even any degree.
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    (Original post by ElChapo)
    Haha, yeah very good chance that poster studied/studies IR, because the kind of jobs they get will never specify we want someone who studied "international relations", they will take from a range of degrees, possibly even any degree.

    I disagree with him but I disagree with you as well.
    For the specific jobs he mentioned, it is quite clear that someone who studied IR would have good advantage over someone who studied, for instance, English, or any other arts degree.
    However, my point would be that number of these jobs are very, very limited and the number of IR graduates is constantly rising.
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    (Original post by anthemofjo)
    I disagree with him but I disagree with you as well.
    For the specific jobs he mentioned, it is quite clear that someone who studied IR would have good advantage over someone who studied, for instance, English, or any other arts degree.
    However, my point would be that number of these jobs are very, very limited and the number of IR graduates is constantly rising.
    Well we will have to agree to disagree, because although studying international relations does show a degree of interest towards those roles, the job can be done just as well by someone with another degree, all the company will want is you to show you are actually interested. Note I'm talking in terms of landing a graduate role, and once you have the experience from your first job, moving into your second job your degree subject won't be so relevant. That's the point I am trying to make.
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    (Original post by ElChapo)
    Well we will have to agree to disagree, because although studying international relations does show a degree of interest towards those roles, the job can be done just as well by someone with another degree, all the company will want is you to show you are actually interested. Note I'm talking in terms of landing a graduate role, and once you have the experience from your first job, moving into your second job your degree subject won't be so relevant. That's the point I am trying to make.
    So, in the specific case we are talking about, IR graduate a part from the obvious interest in the subject, has no knowledge whatsoever which this multinational company could use?
    I am still very interested to hear which arguments would MichelBraga use to support his opinion.
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    (Original post by anthemofjo)
    So, in the specific case we are talking about, IR graduate a part from the obvious interest in the subject, has no knowledge whatsoever which this multinational company could use?
    I am still very interested to hear which arguments would MichelBraga use to support his opinion.
    The IR grad might have some useful knowledge, but the company will be training the grads to know what they need to know for the job regardless. Most jobs don't use a lot of what you're taught in the degree, the skills are more important
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    (Original post by ElChapo)
    Well we will have to agree to disagree, because although studying international relations does show a degree of interest towards those roles, the job can be done just as well by someone with another degree, all the company will want is you to show you are actually interested. Note I'm talking in terms of landing a graduate role, and once you have the experience from your first job, moving into your second job your degree subject won't be so relevant. That's the point I am trying to make.
    Well, I am an IR graduate, but I'm not from the UK. At least in my country, IR is a valuable degree (just as much as law), because IR offers a large skillset that no other social sciences degree can provide.

    For example, my fellow classmates are now working in HR, corporate diplomacy, security companies, UN, tech companies, etc etc. I have at least 3 classmates (two are 25 and one, 26), all of them are making over 35k, and they were no more than good students. Of course, we were all from a great uni, but that's always important to get an advantage, in any area.

    "the job can be done just as well by someone with another degree". That's a common view, but couldn't be more wrong. Like I said, IR gathers all other social sciences/humanities subjects (international law, foreign trade, media and communications, history, politics, even economics) in one degree, so tecnically, we are more complete than most students. So no, an engineer or an accountant don't have the skills required to do what we do.

    It's funny that natural/hard sciences students always tend to undervalue social sciences degrees for their "subjectivity". I know Med students from Imperial and UCL that can't even write a simple essay. Maybe in the UK it is a poor choice of career (I've heard otherwise), but I can guarantee that it is quite different abroad. There are specific jobs in my government for IR graduates beyond diplomacy, in the state and federal sphere (I'm currently employed by my government).
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    (Original post by MichelBraga)
    Well, I am an IR graduate, but I'm not from the UK. At least in my country, IR is a valuable degree (just as much as law), because IR offers a large skillset that no other social sciences degree can provide.

    For example, my fellow classmates are now working in HR, corporate diplomacy, security companies, UN, tech companies, etc etc. I have at least 3 classmates (two are 25 and one, 26), all of them are making over 35k, and they were no more than good students. Of course, we were all from a great uni, but that's always important to get an advantage, in any area.

    "the job can be done just as well by someone with another degree". That's a common view, but couldn't be more wrong. Like I said, IR gathers all other social sciences/humanities subjects (international law, foreign trade, media and communications, history, politics, even economics) in one degree, so tecnically, we are more complete than most students. So no, an engineer or an accountant don't have the skills required to do what we do.

    It's funny that natural/hard sciences students always tend to undervalue social sciences degrees for their "subjectivity". I know Med students from Imperial and UCL that can't even write a simple essay. Maybe in the UK it is a poor choice of career (I've heard otherwise), but I can guarantee that it is quite different abroad. There are specific jobs in my government for IR graduates beyond diplomacy, in the state and federal sphere (I'm currently employed by my government).
    Despite being biased about your degree, your answer is satisfactory, because its not pure guessing of a current/future student that is the most common to be seen here.
    I do think IR offers wide range of skills and applicable knowledge, and I have not heard anyone speaking of it as useless (a part from typical TSR creatures who will label any arts degree as useless) nor in the UK, nor anywhere else.
    I am interested, since you were not specific on that, where did you and your friends study for your undergraduate degree?
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    (Original post by Wisefire)
    Wait, what? As in the only ones that are happy are the ones that know they'll get 50+ cos of their degree, university, contacts or social and economic capital/you're only gonna be happy (as a graduate) if you become moderately well-off (50k isn't 'rich', at all)? Or as in if you're happy in what you do, you'll get over 50 anyhow?

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    I would say happiness plays a role in a bit of everything, including all the factors associated with income...However that statement is completely subjective.
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    (Original post by MichelBraga)
    With the globalization and the growth of multinational companies, IR graduates became important in major business strategies, so, nowadays they are one of highest payrolls in companies. After graduation, the average winning for an IR graduate is about 27k for initial salary. IR graduates easily reach 50k before their 40s.
    But that doesn't mean that a given IR grad is likely to make that amount because of the degree they did.
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    (Original post by anthemofjo)
    Despite being biased about your degree, your answer is satisfactory, because its not pure guessing of a current/future student that is the most common to be seen here.
    I do think IR offers wide range of skills and applicable knowledge, and I have not heard anyone speaking of it as useless (a part from typical TSR creatures who will label any arts degree as useless) nor in the UK, nor anywhere else.
    I am interested, since you were not specific on that, where did you and your friends study for your undergraduate degree?
    I'm half Italian half Brazilian, I studied at USP (Brazil) and I have friends from the other two major universities for IR studies in the country, UNB and PUC-Rio. I also did an exchange program at Sciences Po Paris for a year. Besides the employed ones, I have friends doing their masters at LSE, a bunch of them at the IHEID and about 3 at Cambridge, but for different subjects, so, all of them are doing fine as well.

    I'm biased, yes, but I speak from my own experience. I work for a security company linked to my government that provides market research and international representation, and currently I'm at the Public Affairs department, and our floor has around 40-50 people. I don't have the exact number, but at least 15 of them are IR grads.
 
 
 
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